0

There are a lot of questions regarding Java methods returning generic types, but none of them helped me out so far.

So here's my code:

interface DAO<K, T> {
   void    insert(T t);
   void    update(K k, T t);
   void    delete(K k);
   void    delete();
   T       select(K k);
   List<T> select();
}

public class CourseDAO implements DAO<String, Course> {
   public void         insert(Course t) {}
   public void         update(String k, Course t) {}
   public void         delete(String k) {}
   public void         delete() {}
   public Course       select(String k) {}
   public List<Course> select() {}
}

public class StudentDAO implements DAO<Long, Student> {
   public void          insert(Student t) {}
   public void          update(Long k, Student t) {}
   public void          delete(Long k) {}
   public void          delete() {}
   public Student       select(Long k) {}
   public List<Student> select() {}
}

public enum EntityType { COURSE, STUDENT }

Now I want a factory method which accepts an EntityType parameter and return an instance of CourseDAO or StudentDAO depending on the parameter value.

I tried the code below without success:

public <K,T> DAO<K,T> createDAOFactory(EntityType type) {
   switch (type) {
      case COURSE  : return (K,T) new CourseDAO();  break;
      case STUDENT : return (K,T) new StudentDAO(); break;
   }
   return null;
}

Could anyone help me in writing and invoking this method???

Cheers,
Romualdo.

6
  • 2
    What problem are you trying to solve with this factory method? As far as I can tell, there can be no sensible way to use such a method (assuming it could compile to begin with). – Steven Aug 15 '17 at 1:08
  • If I remove <K,T> from the method signature keeping DAO as a return type and (K,T) from return's it compiles but Eclipse shows the warning: "DAO is a raw type. References to generic type DAO<K,T> should be parameterized". – Romualdo Rubens de Freitas Aug 15 '17 at 1:14
  • Yes, that's one way to make it compile. But how you intend to call this method and use the DAO it returns? – Steven Aug 15 '17 at 1:18
  • Btw, the break; statements are unreachable and wouldn't compile. – shmosel Aug 15 '17 at 1:33
  • Instead of creating specific instances of entities DAO in the code I just call the factory method passing what "entity" I want. This way I have a more object oriented code creating an interface (software contract) and having all DAO classes implementing this software contract. – Romualdo Rubens de Freitas Aug 15 '17 at 1:37
1

The cast you're looking for is (DAO<K,T>). But you'll get a warning because generic type erasure makes it unsafe. Another inherent risk in the switch factory is that you might forget to create a corresponding case when you add a new EntityType. A safer alternative would be to redefine EntityType with generic types, and let it be the factory. Unfortunately, this isn't possible with proper enums, but you can simulate it like this:

abstract class EntityType<K, T> {
    public abstract DAO<K, T> createDAO();

    public static final EntityType<String, Course> COURSE = new EntityType<String, Course>() {
        @Override
        public DAO<String, Course> createDAO() {
            return new CourseDAO();
        }
    };
    public static final EntityType<Long, Student> STUDENT = new EntityType<Long, Student>() {
        @Override
        public DAO<Long, Student> createDAO() {
            return new StudentDAO();
        }
    };
}

Or you can use lambdas to reduce the boilerplate:

class EntityType<K, T> {
    private final Supplier<DAO<K, T>> constructor;

    private EntityType(Supplier<DAO<K, T>> constructor) {
        this.constructor = constructor;
    }

    public DAO<K, T> createDAO() {
        return constructor.get();
    }

    public static final EntityType<String, Course> COURSE = new EntityType<>(CourseDAO::new);
    public static final EntityType<Long, Student> STUDENT = new EntityType<>(StudentDAO::new);
}

Now, instead of calling createDAOFactory(EntityType.COURSE), you would just call EntityType.COURSE.createDAO().

4
  • Hi Shmosel, in your first example, can you please show how the factory would use this abstract class – Scary Wombat Aug 15 '17 at 1:20
  • @ScaryWombat It is the factory. Edited to clarify. – shmosel Aug 15 '17 at 1:20
  • you would just call EntityType.COURSE.createDAO() OK that makes sense – Scary Wombat Aug 15 '17 at 1:24
  • Now my code runs like this: DAO<String, Course> obj = EntityType.COURSE.createDAO();. Thanks, shmosel. – Romualdo Rubens de Freitas Aug 15 '17 at 1:41
0

maybe you can do like this?

public class StudentDAO<Long,Student> implements DAO<Long, Student> {
    public void          insert(Student t) {}
    public void          update(Long k, Student t) {}
    public void          delete(Long k) {}
    public void          delete() {}
    public Student       select(Long k) {return null;}
    public List<Student> select() {return null;}
}

public <K,T> DAO<K,T>createDAOFactory(EntityType type) {
    switch (type) {
        case COURSE  : return new CourseDAO();
        case STUDENT : return new StudentDAO();
    }
    return null;
}

first answer

you do not need use generics,because Implementation class has specified the type.

public DAO createDAOFactory(EntityType type) {
    switch (type) {
        case COURSE  : return new CourseDAO();
        case STUDENT : return new StudentDAO();
    }
    return null;
}
1
  • Thanks flytosea, I'm doing this way. Plz read my coment on Steven's comment (above). – Romualdo Rubens de Freitas Aug 15 '17 at 1:17

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