4

I've tried pretty much every possible bucket policy. Also tried adding a policy to the user, but I get Access Denied every time I try to download an object from s3 bucket using the AWS Console.

Bucket Policy:

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Id": "MyPolicy",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Principal": {
                "AWS": "arn:aws:iam::12345678901011:user/my-username"
            },
            "Action": "s3:*",
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:s3:::my-bucket",
                "arn:aws:s3:::my-bucket/*"
            ]
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Principal": "*",
            "Action": "s3:PutObject",
            "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::my-bucket/*",
            "Condition": {
                "IpAddress": {
                    "aws:SourceIp": [
                        "XX.XXX.XXX.XXX/24",
                        "XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX/24"
                    ]
                }
            }
        }
    ]
}

That doesn't work so I tried adding a policy to my-username:

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Sid": "StmtXXXXXXXXXX",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "s3:GetObject",
                "s3:PutObject"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:s3:::my-bucket",
                "arn:aws:s3:::my-bucket/*"
            ]
        }
    ]
}
  • 1
    Can you list the objects via the console, but just not download them? How were the objects originally loaded into the bucket? Were they copied there via the CLI? – John Rotenstein Aug 16 '17 at 4:56
  • @JohnRotenstein process: application PUTs an object in the bucket. I refresh the console and I see it appear. I select it and click "Download". I get put on an ugly page that says Access Denied. If I upload an object manually thru the console, I can then immediately download it. – scottndecker Aug 16 '17 at 5:43
14

As strange as it sounds, it is possible to upload an object to Amazon S3 that the account owning the bucket cannot access.

When an object is uploaded to Amazon S3 (PutObject), it is possible to specify an Access Control List (ACL). Possible values are:

  • private
  • public-read
  • public-read-write
  • authenticated-read
  • aws-exec-read
  • bucket-owner-read
  • bucket-owner-full-control

You should normally upload objects with the bucket-owner-full-control ACL. This allows the owner of the bucket access to the object and permission to control the object (eg delete it).

If this permission is not supplied, then they cannot access nor modify the object.

I know that it contradicts the way you'd think buckets should work, but it's true!

How to fix it:

  • Re-upload the objects with bucket-owner-full-control ACL, or
  • The original uploader can loop through the objects and do an in-place CopyObject with a new ACL. This changes the permissions without having to re-upload.
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1

You can solve it by using : http://docs.aws.amazon.com/cli/latest/reference/s3api/put-object-acl.html

put-object-acl : This has to be done by original uploader.

But is definitely faster than copying data again.

I had TB's of data to deal with.

aws s3api put-bucket-acl --bucket $foldername --key $i --grant-full-control uri=http://acs.amazonaws.com/groups/global/AllUsers
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