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I just played with overloading function in c++.

Firstly, I tried

#include <iostream>
void foo(int x) {std::cout << "foo(int)" << x << std::endl;}
void foo(double x) {std::cout << "foo(double)" << x << std::endl;}
void foo(int x,double y) {std::cout << "foo(int,double)" << x << y << std::endl;}
int main() {
    foo(1);
}

It worked.

If I added the default arguments.

void foo(int x=1,double y=1.1) {std::cout << "foo(int,double)" << x << y << std::endl;}

It gives the error: call to 'foo' is ambiguous. Well, I understand that the compiler doesn't know which to choose between foo(int) and foo(int,double). But if I change the main like this

int main()
{
     foo(1.2);
}

Well, it compiled and I get output foo(double) 1.2. I don't understand why it is different between two cases. I google the same question but there is only question int vs float.

  • 3
    Because 1.2 is double and there is an exact match... void foo(int x=1,double y=1.1) is not. – LogicStuff Aug 16 '17 at 7:00
  • 1
    Did you copy-paste the actual code for the question, or did you rewrite it into the question? Because the code you show will not build. Always copy-paste the Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable Example. Otherwise you might introduce unrelated problems that makes it hard for us to figure out what your actual problem might be. Sometimes you might even fix the problem without realizing it if you rewrite the code instead of copy-pasting it, making it impossible for us to replicate your problem. – Some programmer dude Aug 16 '17 at 7:03
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If you added the default arguments to the last method, you have not just 3 methods.

You have this:

#include <iostream>
void foo(int x) {std::cout << "foo(int)" << x << std::endl;}
void foo(double x) {std::cout << "foo(double)" << x << std::endl;}
void foo(int x,double y) {std::cout << "foo(int,double)" << x << y << std::endl;}
void foo() {std::cout << "foo(int,double)" << 1 << 1.1 << std::endl;}
void foo(int x) {std::cout << "foo(int,double)" << x << 1.1 << std::endl;}

So, when you call with a int like foo(1) the compiler don't know if is the foo with int, or the foo with int and double.

  • You missed void foo(double x) {std::cout << "foo(int,double)" << 1 << x << std::endl;}, Sir. – GAVD Aug 16 '17 at 7:19
  • 1
    No, you can't specify just the second argument. You must specify none, the first or both. – Check Aug 16 '17 at 7:21
  • To be pedantic, the extra methods are not generated/ doesn't exist, but the idea is here. – Jarod42 Aug 16 '17 at 7:25
  • Yeah, of course, it's just for the idea.^^ – Check Aug 16 '17 at 7:26
  • Done! I understood. Thanks you. – GAVD Aug 16 '17 at 8:01
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If you add

void foo(double x=1.1,int y=1) {std::cout << "foo(int,double)" << x << y << std::endl;}

Your example with foo(1.2) won't work again because now it matches foo(double) and foo(double, int) because you offered default arguments. These default arguments are still positional though.

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When you are providing the default values for the foo(int x, double y) function, and calling foo(1) from the main(), you're also providing the call as foo(1, 1.1) as you have the default values set.

This gives the compiler an ambiguous call between foo(1) and foo(1, 1.1).

But when you're calling as foo(1.2), it'd only call as foo(1, 1.2) So no ambiguity.

P.S. You have a typo in the output :p

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Look into [over.ics.scs]/3.

void foo(double x) is an exact match for 1.2 (double), with greater rank than
void foo(int x = 1, double y = 1.1), where floating-integral conversion is required.

Default arguments don't play role in overloading.

  • Well, I found this question but I don't understand why I changed void foo(double x=1.1, int y = 1) {}, it makes same error for foo(1.2). – GAVD Aug 16 '17 at 7:16
  • Because it's the same case as in "Well, I understand that the compiler doesn't know which to choose between foo(int) and foo(int,double)". – LogicStuff Aug 16 '17 at 7:17
  • So, what is different? If I changed like that, the calling foo(1) gives output foo(int)1 as expected. Why the position of default arguments make the difference here? – GAVD Aug 16 '17 at 7:21
  • You are reordering the types of the parameters. They are positional. 1.2 always goes to the first parameter, not the second in void foo(int x = 1, double y = 1.1). – LogicStuff Aug 16 '17 at 7:23
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You need to declare and define a variable with double type to call and override successfully the foo(int) with foo(double).

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void foo(int x) {std::cout << "foo(int)" << x << std::endl;}
void foo(double x) {std::cout << "foo(double)" << x << std::endl;}
void foo(int x,double y) {std::cout << "foo(int,double)" << x << y << std::endl;}

int main()
{
    double x = 5;
    foo(x);

    return 0;
}

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