8

I have divs that i want to wrap to the next line when the browser window gets smaller. I also want margin to be put in between the divs so that there's a gap between them. The problem I'm having is that the margin on the centre divs causes the divs to wrap incorrectly if the browser is set to a specific size. At a certain size you have 2 divs underneath one div. See my screenshot below as an example and this fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/uhh2jwe2/ (change the width of the window)

This really needs to be dynamic as it will be a framework solution for laying out differently sized divs. The parent div will be fluid similar to the example. Any help would be great

enter image description here

#outer {
  width: 90%;
  height: 90%;
  margin: 5%;
  overflow: auto;
  background-color: red;
}

.inner1 {
  float: left;
  width: 150px;
  height: 150px;
  margin-right: 20px;
  background-color: blue;
}

.inner2 {
  float: left;
  width: 150px;
  height: 150px;
  margin-right: 20px;
  background-color: blue;
}

.inner3 {
  float: left;
  width: 150px;
  height: 150px;
  background-color: blue;
}
<div id="outer">
  <div class="inner1">1</div>
  <div class="inner2">2</div>
  <div class="inner3">3</div>
</div>

3
  • "I have inline-block divs" I can't see any in provided code. Commented Aug 16, 2017 at 11:28
  • I took out the inline-block part as i also took it out of the example. it's irrelevant. you should be able to see the code and div examples though
    – kev670
    Commented Aug 16, 2017 at 11:30
  • It is obvious really... when the outer width is less than 340px it cannot fit two 170px divs horizontally (150px width + 20px margin). If you add right margin to the third div as well you will get predictable result. What is yur expected output anyway?
    – Salman A
    Commented Aug 16, 2017 at 11:35

6 Answers 6

2

You can use media queries to alter the css on smaller screen.

#outer {
  width: 90%;
  height: 90%;
  margin: 5%;
  overflow: auto;
  background-color: red;
}

.inner1 {
  float: left;
  width: 150px;
  height: 150px;
  margin-right: 20px;
  background-color: blue;
}

.inner2 {
  float: left;
  width: 150px;
  height: 150px;
  margin-right: 20px;
  background-color: blue;
}

.inner3 {
  float: left;
  width: 150px;
  height: 150px;
  background-color: blue;
}

@media (max-width: 435px) {
  #outer > div {
      margin-right:auto;
      margin-left:auto;
      margin-bottom:15px;
      float:none;
  }
}
<div id="outer">
  <div class="inner1">1</div>
  <div class="inner2">2</div>
  <div class="inner3">3</div>
</div>

2

Use Media query like this:

#outer div:last-child {
    margin-bottom: 0;
}

@media screen and (max-width:570px) {
    .inner1, .inner2, .inner3 {
        margin-bottom: 5px;
    }
}

@media screen and (max-width:411px) {
    .inner1, .inner2, .inner3 {
        float: none;
        margin: auto;
        margin-bottom: 5px;
    }
}

#outer {
    width: 90%;
    height: 90%;
    margin: 5%;
    overflow: auto;
    background-color: red;
}

.inner1 {
    float: left;
    width: 150px;
    height: 150px;
    margin-right: 20px;
    background-color: blue;
}
.inner2 {
    float: left;
    width: 150px;
    height: 150px;
    margin-right: 20px;
    background-color: blue;
}
.inner3 {
    float: left;
    width: 150px;
    height: 150px;
    background-color: blue;
}

#outer div:last-child {
    margin-bottom: 0;
}

@media screen and (max-width:570px) {
    .inner1, .inner2, .inner3 {
        margin-bottom: 5px;
    }
}

@media screen and (max-width:411px) {
    .inner1, .inner2, .inner3 {
        float: none;
        margin: auto;
        margin-bottom: 5px;
    }
}
<div id="outer">
    <div class="inner1">1</div>
    <div class="inner2">2</div>
    <div class="inner3">3</div>
</div>

1

I would recommend a solution that extracts the grid-elements from the content-elements. Therefore you have a lot more control about your layout and you can be more flexible with content you want to place into it.

  • Use your .inner elements as grid-elements and wrap content inside them into .inner-content
  • Wrap all inners into a row to get rid of the outer-gutter
  • Give the .inner elements a percentage-width and a px-max-width. So the elments can take alwyay 33.33% of the avaiable width but never more then 150px.
  • I added some adjustments for small screens, so the .inner elements wrap below each other and take more then 33.33% of the .outer container width.
  • Inspect the code: http://jsfiddle.net/uhh2jwe2/5/

* {
  box-sizing: border-box;
}

/* flexible outer container */
.outer {
  width: 90%;
  height: 90%;
  margin: 5%;
  overflow: hidden;
  background-color: red;
}

/* remove outer gutter */
.row {
  margin: 0 -10px;
}

/* .inner will take care of the width */
.inner {
  width: 33.33%;
  max-width: 150px;
  float: left;
  padding: 0 10px;
}

/* .inner-content take care of the height */
.inner-content {
  height: 150px;
  color: #fff;
  background: blue;
}

@media (max-width: 435px) {
  /* this wraps .inner elements below each other and extends width */
  .outer .inner {
      padding: 10px 0;
      width: 100%;
      max-width: 100%;
      float:none;
  }  
}
<div class="outer">
  <div class="row">
    <div class="inner">
      <div class="inner-content">1</div>
    </div>
    <div class="inner">
      <div class="inner-content">2</div>
    </div>
    <div class="inner">
      <div class="inner-content">3</div>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

0
1

I would suggest to use bootstrap's technique for that. Have padding on both sides of your inner elements, and negate it with negative margin on the container.

This will require more markup tough. While .row and .container could be merge on the same element, the background-color would overflow to the left because of the negative margin.

.container {
  background-color: green;
  width: 510px;
}

.row {
  font-size: 0;
  margin: 0 -15px;
}

.block {
  font-size: 12px;
  padding: 0 15px;
  display: inline-block;
}

.content {
  width: 150px;
  height: 150px;
  background-color: red;
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="row">
    <div class="block">
      <div class="content">

      </div>
    </div>
    <div class="block">
      <div class="content">

      </div>
    </div>
    <div class="block">
      <div class="content">

      </div>
    </div>
    <div class="block">
      <div class="content">

      </div>
    </div>
    <div class="block">
      <div class="content">

      </div>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

0

in your example, the first two divs are 170px wide (150+20), and the third is 150px wide because it doesn't have a margin, thats the problem.

avoid @media if you mant it to be fully responsive and not jumping from 4 items a line to 1 item a linefor example.

you can solve your issue by simply adding a margin-right:20 to your last element, but it is better to to like so :

.inner1, .inner2, .inner3{
    float: left;
    width: 150px;
    height: 150px;
    margin: 2px 10px; //left & right sides to half of 20px
    background-color: blue;
}

because it will split the margin to the two sides, making it more symetrical.


For laying out differently sized divs.

if all your divs can change size but stay equal, it will work, but if the first div is 70 and the 2nd and 3rd are 50, there will always be two divs on the bottom line at some point.

0

I think I've found the simplest solution to what I'm trying to do without having to use media queries. I simply added the right margin to all fields including the last field rather than adding it to every field except the final field.

I then wrap all the fields in another div and add a minus margin (the same size as the gaps) so that the fields will wrap when they hit the side of the container. Here's a fiddle with the solution: http://jsfiddle.net/rahg1ky3/

#outer {
    width: 90%;
    height: 90%;
    margin: 5%;
    overflow: auto;
    background-color: red;
}
#inner {
    margin-right: -20px;
} 
.cont {
    float: left;
    width: 150px;
    height: 150px;
    margin-right: 20px;
    background-color: blue;
}

<div id="outer">
  <div id = "inner">
    <div class="cont">1</div>
    <div class="cont">2</div>
    <div class="cont">3</div>
  </div>
</div>

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