1

I have the following kind of subroutine wrapper to pass a Fortran array to a ISO_C_BINDING-bound C function.

subroutine mysub( array )
  integer, dimension(:) :: array
  call f_mysub( size(array) , array(1) )
end subroutine

The problem is that if the array is of size 0 then array(1) is out-of-bounds. What's the right way to handle this situation?

In general I cannot avoid the call, i.e. with a if( size(array) > 0 ) because the call may be important to register, e.g. it is actually a class method, naturally with different signature than above, and could clear an existing array.

Example Files

The C routine is c_mysub.c.

#include <stdio.h>
void c_mysub( size_t* size, int* arr )
{
    printf("size=%d\n",*size);
    for(size_t i=0; i<*size; ++i)
    {
        printf("element %d=%d\n",i,arr[i]);
    }
}

The main Fortran file is mysub.f90

module mysub_I
interface
subroutine f_mysub( size, arr) BIND(C,name="c_mysub")
    use,intrinsic :: ISO_C_BINDING
    integer(C_SIZE_T) :: size
    integer(C_INT) :: arr
end subroutine
end interface
end module

module mysub_M
use mysub_I
contains

subroutine mysub( array )
  use ISO_C_BINDING
  integer, dimension(:) :: array
  call f_mysub( int(size(array),C_SIZE_T) , array(1) )
end subroutine

end module

program main
use mysub_M
integer, allocatable :: x(:)

allocate( x(7) )
x=1

call mysub( x )

deallocate( x )
allocate( x(0) )

call mysub( x )

end

Compile the C with gcc -c c_mysub.c and the Fortran with gfortran -fbounds-check c_mysub.o mysub.f90, which gives the following error when you run the code, balking at the second call with size=0.

size=7
0:1
1:1
2:1
3:1
4:1
5:1
6:1
At line 18 of file mysub.f90
Fortran runtime error: Index '1' of dimension 1 of array 'array' above upper bound of 0

Compiling with bounds check off behaves as expected.

size=7
0:1
1:1
2:1
3:1
4:1
5:1
6:1
size=0
  • You can temporarily dimension your array to 1 if it is empty. – Michaël Roy Aug 16 '17 at 12:36
  • ... Or have a dummy array ready for the occasion. – Michaël Roy Aug 16 '17 at 12:39
  • 3
    What is the interface for c_mysub? Why do you wish to pass a scalar array element to it, even when the array may have no elements? – francescalus Aug 16 '17 at 13:20
  • Just to back up francescalus why are you not just passing the array? – Ian Bush Aug 16 '17 at 14:14
  • 1
    Normally you should pass just array, not array(1). Hard to say more if you don't show the real code. There is some risk of array being non-contiguous and array(1) will avoid creating a temporary copy and that could actually be wrong. – Vladimir F Aug 16 '17 at 16:11
1

I do not see any reason to pass array(1) as actual argument. The whole array array should be passed.

  call f_mysub( size(array) , array )

and the interface must be changed to pass an array and not just a scalar

  integer(C_INT) :: arr(*)

Passing the first element (even to an array argument) could easily cause incorrect behaviour if array is not contiguous - which is theoretically possible given it is assumed shape dummy argument (with (:)).

If you pass the whole array and size 0 then just make sure no element is actually dereferenced from the pointer in the C procedure (which should already be the case if it is well-written).

  • What does the f_mysub look like in that case? The c_mysub will have int[] arr as argument, right? – redwizard792 Aug 16 '17 at 16:58
  • Now I only realized you have a wrong interface, you must indeed correct it. – Vladimir F Aug 16 '17 at 17:00
  • The C argument can be array or pointer, it does not matter. int *array is fine. – Vladimir F Aug 16 '17 at 17:02
  • Is it not the case that an array of zero size is not interoperable with any C array? – francescalus Aug 16 '17 at 17:05
  • I was just going to check that. It possibly is not. But in practice, whatever address is passed, it should not be dereferenced. Even a null pointer can be passed. One could add an if and pass a c_null_pointer instead, but I don't think it is worth it. I just have to check no bad stuff happens on the Fortran side. – Vladimir F Aug 16 '17 at 17:12

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