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Unlike a raster image (e.g. a PNG), a screen reader could in theory read and somewhat understand the content of an SVG file. What do screen readers typically do when they encounter an SVG image, and how does this behavior differ from when they encounter a raster image?

There are a few specific things I'm trying to figure out:

  1. Will a screen reader attempt to announce anything inside the SVG, such as content in <svg:text> tags (using the order content appears in the SVG as the reading order)?
  2. If screen readers do try to announce stuff in an SVG, are there techniques to help them (for example, a way to tell them "this path here shows a star")?
  3. Will a screen reader treat inline SVG content and a <img src="file.svg"/> differently?
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Accessibility support has been considered since the very first versions of SVG.

The latest (in development) version ov SVG (version 2) has an expanded section on accessibility.

However I don't know the details of exactly how well the popular screen readers support SVG files. You'll have to research that yourself.

Will a screen reader attempt to announce anything inside the SVG, such as content in tags (using the order content appears in the SVG as the reading order)?

Have you tried?

If screen readers do try to announce stuff in an SVG, are there techniques to help them (for example, a way to tell them "this path here shows a star")?

Yes. you would use ARIA tags. See the above links.

Will a screen reader treat inline SVG content and a differently?

Absolutely. SVGs loaded as <img> (that also includes background-image etc) are effectively bitmaps. There contents are not accessible to the page nor screen readers. If you want an SVG to be accessible, it needs to be inline. Although it is also possible SVGs loaded via <object> may be supported by the screen readers.

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You can insert a title inside svg root element to label that image, example:

<svg version="1.1" width="300" height="200">
<title>Green rectangle</title>
<rect width="75" height="50" rx="20" ry="20" fill="#90ee90" stroke="#228b22" stroke-fill="1" />
</svg>

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