1

I wrote this little function in JavaScript:

var getChampionFile = function(callback){
    var championFile = JSON.parse(fs.readFileSync(
        'dragontail/championFull.json',
        'utf8'
    ));
    return callback(championFile);
};

I made a callback for obvious reasons. So when I use the getChampionFile function, I pass in an anonymous function as a callback that simply returns the championFile.

EDIT: as pointed out, the callback was not obvious. I used fs.readFile instead of fs.readFileSync when writing the callback, I didn't notice I had changed it somewhere along the way (maybe I took it over from the internet, maybe Atom suggested it and I accidentally used it) - sorry for any confusion.

var getAllChampions = function(){
    var championFile = getChampionFile(function (championFile){
        return championFile;
    });
    return championFile.data;
};

Now I want to write some more functions that use this getChampionFile function. I have the following options:

  • Write that anonymous function every time again
  • Turn the anonymous function into a separate re-usable function, eg. var returnData = function(data){return data;} and put that in a seperate module so I can use it everywhere in my project, but requiring a module for a function that's 1 line of code just seems silly.
  • Make a function that doesn't need a callback, invokes getChampionFile() and passes the anonymous function as a callback. (basically getAllChampions() with return championFile; instead of return championFile.data;)

What would be the recommended option / best practice?

  • 5
    "I made a callback for obvious reasons" It's not obvious at all. You've written a synchronous function, had it call a callback, and return that callback's value. There's not really any point to that, and it unnecessarily restricts your options; instead, just compose the two functions separately: theCallback(getChampionFile()). – T.J. Crowder Aug 16 '17 at 16:09
  • 1
    It's not clear what problem you're trying to solve with the callback in getChampionFile, or what the three options you're considering would look like. We can't really help you on the basis of the question as it is now. Could you please use the "edit" link to clarify what the point of the callback is, what your end goal is, and what the options you're considering actually look like? – T.J. Crowder Aug 16 '17 at 16:11
  • 1
    No. Simply return championFile from it: var getChampionFile = function() { return JSON.parse(fs.readFileSync( 'dragontail/championFull.json', 'utf8')); }; (Or better yet, make it async. Synchronous I/O is a major no-no in NodeJS.) – T.J. Crowder Aug 16 '17 at 16:16
  • 2
    And if you make it asynchronous, consider using Promise so it's readily composed, aggregated, consumable via the new await, ... – T.J. Crowder Aug 16 '17 at 16:17
  • 1
    To make sure the .json file is read before handling it, I thought it was necessary to implement a callback, hence why I think it is obvious. The .json file will always be read before proceeding to the next line if you are reading it synchronously. If that were not the case, you wouldn't be able to pass the result directly into JSON.parse() or do any of the other things you're doing in getChampionFile. – JLRishe Aug 16 '17 at 16:22
1

You have a misunderstanding in a comment here which has kind of taken you down the rabbit hole:

To make sure the .json file is read before handling it, I thought it was necessary to implement a callback.

It is, if you're reading it asynchronously. But you're not, you're using readFileSync.

Reading it asynchronously would be much better; synchronous I/O is a major no-no on NodeJS.

Instead, read the file asynchronously and either provide a Node-style callback parameter:

var getChampionFile = function(callback) {
    fs.readFile('dragontail/championFull.json', 'utf8', function(err, data) {
        if (err) {
            callback(err);
        } else {
            try {
                callback(null, JSON.parse(data));
            } catch (e) {
                callback(e);
            }
        }
    ));
};

...or create a Promise-enabled function instead:

var getChampionFile = function() {
    return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        fs.readFile('dragontail/championFull.json', 'utf8', function(err, data) {
            if (err) {
                reject(err);
            } else {
                try {
                    resolve(JSON.parse(data));
                } catch (e) {
                    reject(e);
                }
            }
        ));
    });
};

Then, compose the function just like you compose other Node-style callback functions, or other Promise-enabled functions, depending on which way you go.

  • I think I started off async (fs.readFile), implemented the callback and after some rewrites of the function accidentally changed it to fs.readFileSync. Sorry for any confusion and thanks for the awesome explanation. – Max Aug 16 '17 at 16:34
  • @Max: That sounds like exactly the kind of thing I'd do. :-) Glad that helped! – T.J. Crowder Aug 16 '17 at 16:35

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