0

I have a function return list of list, I would like to find the standard deviation of the matrices of my output. The output of my function is a list of two list. I tried this code but it return me NAN. Since my function is complex, then I use this example from another question please see here since it is quite close to what I am trying to do.

> A <- matrix(c(1:9), 3, 3) 
> A
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    4    7
[2,]    2    5    8
[3,]    3    6    9
> B <- matrix(c(2:10), 3, 3) 
> B
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    2    5    8
[2,]    3    6    9
[3,]    4    7   10
> my.list1 <- list(A, B)

so the mean of the first list is:

  [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]  1.5  4.5  7.5
[2,]  2.5  5.5  8.5
[3,]  3.5  6.5  9.5

Then the standard deviation will be:

          [,1]      [,2]      [,3]
[1,] 0.7071068 0.7071068 0.7071068
[2,] 0.7071068 0.7071068 0.7071068
[3,] 0.7071068 0.7071068 0.7071068

> c <- matrix(c(1:9), 3, 3) 
    > c
         [,1] [,2] [,3]
    [1,]    1    4    7
    [2,]    2    5    8
    [3,]    3    6    9

> d <- matrix(c(2:10), 3, 3) 
> d
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    2    5    8
[2,]    3    6    9
[3,]    4    7   10

> my.list2 <- list(c, d)

my.list <-list(my.list1,my.list2)

How can I get the standard deviation of my matrices on an element by element for the list?

2

Try ?rapply

> rapply(my.list, sd)
[1] 2.738613 2.738613 2.738613 2.738613
7
  • Thank you so much for your help. I need the output to return as a matrix. Also, I need to access a specific element of my list. x[[1]][[1]]$par.
    – user8389133
    Aug 16 '17 at 17:09
  • we don't have 'par' anywhere in your example. also... what do you mean return in a matrix? are you looking for the standard deviations of each matrix, or deviation of one as compared to another? Aug 16 '17 at 17:11
  • "par" isn't defined anywhere in your list elements is what I'm getting at. Aug 16 '17 at 17:11
  • yes par is not in my example since my function is very, very long and complex. I need to have the standard deviation of all matrix and store them in a new matrix.
    – user8389133
    Aug 16 '17 at 17:14
  • I just add par and the last line of the code to show how I can access the element of the output of my function.
    – user8389133
    Aug 16 '17 at 17:15
0

You could bind your lists into an array, or perhaps make your function return an array(?), then you could use apply() to apply your chosen functions...

A <- matrix(1:9, 3, 3) 
B <- matrix(2:10, 3, 3) 
my.list1 <- list(A, B)

c <- matrix(1:9, 3, 3) 
d <- matrix(2:10, 3, 3) 
my.list2 <- list(c, d)

Create array from all 4 lists

my.array1 <- abind::abind(c(my.list1, my.list2), along = 3)

Find the mean() of the required dimension

apply(my.array1, c(1, 2), mean)
apply(my.array1, c(1,2), sd)

Output

     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]  1.5  4.5  7.5
[2,]  2.5  5.5  8.5
[3,]  3.5  6.5  9.5
4
  • Then I can do the same for the standard deviation. Many thanks.
    – user8389133
    Aug 16 '17 at 19:40
  • @Silver_80, Exactly, you could even do both at the same time if you wished: funs <- list(mean, sd), lapply(funs, function(f) apply(my.array1, c(1, 2), f))
    – user7396508
    Aug 16 '17 at 19:50
  • amazing, could you please explain what does f refer to?
    – user8389133
    Aug 16 '17 at 20:42
  • lapply() loops over the funs object. It passes each function in the list to the f argument in the anonymous function. The f in the apply() thus takes the value of each function (from funs) in turn. Hope that helps.
    – user7396508
    Aug 16 '17 at 20:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy