6

Consider the following code:

function f {
    param (
        [AllowNull()]
        [string]
        $x
    )
    return $x
}

$r = f -x $null

$null is converted to [string]::Empty by the time return is reached. $null is different from [string]::Empty and I'd like to preserve this distinction. I'd also prefer to keep $x as type [string] because $x only has meaning as a string and the interface is used elsewhere.

  1. How can I make $x come out as $null when it is passed $null?
  2. Is there some other way I can tell that $x was passed $null not [string]::Empty from inside f?

Update 1

What I am trying to do works for other types. Here is the same concept for [int]:

function f { 
    param( 
        [System.Nullable[int]]$x 
    )
    return $x 
}

$r = f -x $null

In that case $r is indeed $null. $x can be either $null or [int] but nothing else. It seems strange to me to have to allow any object just so I can pass a $null or [int].

[System.Nullable[string]] produces an error that boils down to [System.Nullable[T]] requires that [T] is a value type. [string] is a reference type, so that doesn't work.


Update 2

It seems to be possible to pass $null without causing conversion to a parameter of any type except [string]. I've tested the following:

function f { param([System.Nullable[int]]$x) $x }
function f { param([System.Nullable[System.DayOfWeek]]$x) $x }
function f { param([hashtable]$x) $x }
function f { param([array]$x) $x }
function f { param([System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary[string,int]]$x) $x }
function f { param([System.Collections.ArrayList]$x) $x }
function f { param([System.Collections.BitArray]$x) $x }
function f { param([System.Collections.SortedList]$x) $x }
function f { param([System.Collections.Queue]$x) $x }
function f { param([System.Collections.Stack]$x) $x }

Passing $null to any of these functions outputs $null. The only parameter type I haven't found a way to which to pass $null without conversion is [string].


Update 3

PowerShell's behavior in this regard is also inconsistent with C#. The corresponding function in C# is as follows:

public string f(string x)
{
    return x;
}

Calling f(null) returns null.


Update 4

Apparently [NullString]::Value was intended to address this problem. I seems to work to pass null to string parameters in C# APIs. However, [NullString]::Value gets converted to [string]::empty in PowerShell the same as $null. Consider the following code:

function f {
    param (
        [AllowNull()]
        [string]
        $x
    )
    return $x
}

$r = f -x ([NullString]::Value)
$r.GetType().Name

Executing that code outputs String. $r is [string]::Empty despite that [NullString]::Value was passed to $x.


Update 5

The PowerShell team has indicated that this was by design:

This is by design and ... changing the behavior would be a massive breaking change.

That thread involved an interesting discussion about the reasoning behind it. I suspect that some of ramifications of this behavior were not understood when the decision was made as the behavior directly contravenes PowerShell cmdlet "Strongly Encouraged Design Guideline" SD03 which reads in part as follows:

If your parameter needs to differentiate between 3 values: $true, $false and “unspecified”, then define a parameter of type Nullable. The need for a 3rd, "unspecified" value typically occurs when the cmdlet can modify a Boolean property of an object. In this case "unspecified" means to not change the current value of the property.

  • 2
    You're casting the parameter into a string with [string] before $x – Jason Snell Aug 16 '17 at 18:05
  • Exactly. If you don't want something cast to a string: don't cast it to a string. – Ansgar Wiechers Aug 16 '17 at 21:12
  • 1
    Nullable<T> doesn't work for strings, because the type itself is already nullable (in principle). The problem you're facing is that PowerShell casts a $null value to a string when passing it to the parameter, which auto-converts the value to an empty string. – Ansgar Wiechers Aug 16 '17 at 22:52
  • @AnsgarWiechers I agree. The conversion to [string]::empty seems like strange behavior when both [AllowNull()] and [string] are present. – alx9r Aug 16 '17 at 23:29
  • 1
    @JasonSnell "A string cannot be null, it can only be empty." I don't think that's an accurate generalization. It's not true for class members, for example. If you instantiate class c { [string]$x }, x is $null not [string]::Empty. – alx9r Aug 17 '17 at 15:47
3

To summarize and complement the information from the question, answers, and comments:

  • PowerShell converts $null to '' (the empty string) when it is assigned to [string]-typed [parameter] variables, and parameter variables also default to ''.

    • The only exception is the use of uninitialized [string] properties in PSv5+ custom classes, as alxr9 (the OP) points out: class c { [string] $x }; $null -eq ([c]::new()).x indeed yields $True implying that property .x contains $null. However, this exception is likely accidental and probably a bug, given that when you initialize the property with $null or assign $null to it later, the conversion to '' again kicks in; similarly, using return $null from a [string]-typed method outputs ''.

    • The exception aside, PowerShell's behavior differs from C# string variables / parameter, to which you can assign / pass null directly, and which default to null in certain contexts. string is a .NET reference type, and this behavior applies to all reference types.
      (Since reference type instances can inherently contain null, there is no need for a separate nullable wrapper via System.Nullable`1, which is indeed not supported (it works for value types only).)

    • As noted in the question, PowerShell's departure from C#'s behavior is by (historical) design, and it's too late to change it.

  • [NullString]::Value was introduced in v3 specifically to allow passing null to string parameters of .NET methods - and while use in pure PowerShell code wasn't explicitly discouraged or prevented, the unexpected behavior in update 4 and the comments by a core PowerShell team member (see below) suggest that such uses weren't anticipated.

However, thanks to sleuthing by PetSerAl, there is a workaround to make the code from update 4 work:

function f {
    param (
        [string] $x
    )
    if ($False) { Remove-Variable } # Workaround
    return $x
}

$r = f -x ([NullString]::Value)
$r.GetType().Name  # now fails, because $r is $null

It is most likely this optimization bug that necessitates this - obscure - workaround.

Note that when assigning / passing [NullString]::Value to a [string]-typed [parameter] variable, it is instantly converted to $null (in the case of a parameter variable, only if the bug gets fixed or with the workaround in place). However, once $null has been successfully stored in the variable this way, it can apparently be passed around as such (again, only if the bug gets fixed or with the workaround in place).

Caveat: Fixing the above-mentioned optimization bug would help in the update 4 scenario, but there may be other pitfalls, given that use of [NullString]::Value was never intended outside the context of calling .NET methods; to quote a core member of the PowerShell team from https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/issues/4616#issuecomment-323597003:

Parameters to C# methods was the target scenario for [NullString]::Value, and I will say that might be the only reasonable scenario.


If you don't want to rely on the workaround / wait for the fix and/or don't want to burden the caller with having to pass [NullString]::Value instead of $null, you can build on the answers by Curios and Jason Schnell, which rely on using an untyped (implicitly [object]-typed) or explicitly [object]-typed parameter, which can accept $null as-is:

function f {
    param (
        [AllowNull()] # Explicitly allow passing $null.
                      # Note: Strictly speaking only necessary with [Parameter(Mandatory=$True)]
        $x # Leave the parameter untyped (or use [object]) so as to retain $null as-is
    )

    # Convert $x to a type-constrained [string] variable *now*:
    if ($null -eq $x) {
        # Make $x contain $null, despite being [string]-typed
        [string] $x = [NullString]::Value
    } else {
        # Simply convert any other type to a string.
        [string] $x = $x
    }

    # $x is now a bona fide [string] variable that can be used
    # as such even in .NET method calls.

    return $x
}

It's somewhat cumbersome, but enables the caller to pass $null directly (or any string, or a type of any other instance that will be converted to a string).

A slight down-side is that this approach doesn't allow you to define positional parameters in the same position via different parameter sets that are selected by the parameters' specific types.


Finally, it's worth mentioning that if it's sufficient to detect when a (non-mandatory) parameter was omitted, you can check $PSBoundParameters:

function f {
    param (
        [string] $x
    )

    if ($PSBoundParameters.ContainsKey('x')) { # Was a value passed to parameter -x?
        "-x argument was passed: $x"
    } else {
        "no -x argument passed."
    }
}

As stated, this only works for the omission case (and therefore doesn't work for mandatory parameters at all). If you pass $null, the usual conversion to '' kicks in, and you won't be able to distinguish between passing $null and ''.
(Though if you added the above workaround / waited for the bug fix, you could again pass [NullString]::Value to effectively pass $null, or even use [NullString]::Value as the parameter default value.)

  • 1
    [NullString]::Value did the trick! I had to pass a true NULL to an external function that differentiated between NULL and an empty string. Never realized Powershell botched strings like this. – Brain2000 Jan 9 at 19:20
2
function f {
    param (
        [AllowNull()]$x
    )
    return $x
}

$r = f -x $null

By removing the [string] and using [AllowNull()] the above function will now allow you to pass in a null object or an empty string. You can check for the type using $x.GetType with an if statement and determining if $x is null or an empty string.

  • 1
    If you want to ensure that the parameter is either $null or a string you could validate the parameter: [ValidateScript($_ -eq $null -or $_ -is [string])]. You could also cast non-null parameter values to string in the body, but that might yield undesired results (e.g. when the string representation of an object is its type rather than its value). – Ansgar Wiechers Aug 16 '17 at 21:11
  • @AnsgarWiechers You should make that comment an answer. It's far and away the most helpful suggestion yet. – alx9r Aug 16 '17 at 21:48
  • Nah. This answer already resolves the root problem. I merely suggested some fine-tuning. – Ansgar Wiechers Aug 16 '17 at 22:17
  • 2
    FWIW PowerShell throws an exception when you pass $null to a parameter with the [ValidateScript()] attribute. It looks parameter validation would have to take place in the body. – alx9r Aug 16 '17 at 23:24
2

By default, [string] assigns default value as [string]::Empty, so the parameter definition will convert it whenever enters function f.
a. You can change the parameter as [object]$x

[object]$newparamnull -eq $null
[string]$newparamstring -eq [string]::Empty    

b. The previous change will do the job:

function f {
    param (
        [AllowNull()]
        [object]
        $x)
   if($x -eq $null) {
      write-output "null" 
   }
   elseif($x -eq [string]::empty){
      write-output "empty"
   } 
   else {"other"}
}

Test:

f -x $null
f -x [string]::empty
f -x "aaa"
  • "By default, [string] assigns default value as [string]::Empty" I don't think that's an accurate generalization. It's not true for classes, for example. If you instantiate class c { [string]$x }, x is $null not [string]::Empty. – alx9r Aug 16 '17 at 21:29

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