1

I want to output an error if the field in json contains a value of null. How can I do it? I have tried "encoding/json". Maybe I need another library.

Code example:

package main

import (
    "encoding/json"
    "fmt"
    "strings"
)

type Item struct {
    Value  *int
}


func main() {
    var jsonBlob = `[
        {},
        {"Value": null},
        {"Value": 0},
        {"Value": 1}
    ]`
    var items []Item

    err := json.NewDecoder(strings.NewReader(jsonBlob)).Decode(&items)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println("error:", err)
    }
    for _, a := range items {
        if a.Value != nil {
            fmt.Println(*a.Value)
        } else {
            fmt.Println(a.Value)
        }
    }
}

I got:

<nil>
<nil>
0
1

I want:

<nil>
<error>
0
1

Please help. Many thanks!

  • Why would "Value": null result in an error? null is a perfectly valid value for a pointer field, and correctly deserializes to nil, which is Go's null. – Adrian Aug 16 '17 at 19:28
  • I am writing rest-api. This is one of the requirements. – Ilya Aug 16 '17 at 19:41
  • @Ilya: this seems like an odd requirement for an API, null and unset are often the same thing. – JimB Aug 16 '17 at 19:49
  • @JimB: This is the API for the competition. I can not do anything about it. As I understand, such a request ( curl -i localhost:80/items/1 -d '{ "value": null}' ) says that you need to reset the value, which means that the request is not correct and the service should return an error. – Ilya Aug 16 '17 at 19:57
4

If you want to control how a type is unmarshaled, you can implement json.Unmarshaler

Since a map allows you to tell the difference between an unset value, and a null value, unmarshaling first into a generic map[string]interface{} will allow you to inspect the values without tokenizing the JSON.

type Item struct {
    Value *int
}


func (i *Item) UnmarshalJSON(b []byte) error {
    tmp := make(map[string]interface{})

    err := json.Unmarshal(b, &tmp)
    if err != nil {
        return err
    }

    val, ok := tmp["Value"]
    if ok && val == nil {
        return errors.New("Value cannot be nil")

    }
    if !ok {
        return nil
    }

    f, ok := val.(float64)
    if !ok {
        return fmt.Errorf("unexpected type %T for Value", val)
    }

    n := int(f)
    i.Value = &n
    return nil
}

https://play.golang.org/p/MNDsQpfEJA

  • I don't think this works, per the question, they want the zero value to be nil but null value to result in an error, per the "I want" section in the question. – Adrian Aug 16 '17 at 19:31
  • @Ilya: I've updated with a map example, which shows how to differentiate "unset" vs "null" – JimB Aug 16 '17 at 20:06
  • @JimB: Thank you very much! But it seems this will seriously slow down the processing of the request. – Ilya Aug 16 '17 at 20:14
  • @Ilya: have you tested how much it will slow it down? It will add some allocations, but encoding/json isn't particularly fast. If you want performance, you will need a different package, or write one to handle this specific case. – JimB Aug 16 '17 at 20:16
  • 1
    @Ilya: 2.5 times what? If it's still running in microseconds, that's not much compared to an actual http request. As I mentioned, if you need more performance, feel free to write your own decoder to handle this specific case. It seems this may be the purpose of this example in the game, and I don't have time right now to write your competition entry for you. – JimB Aug 16 '17 at 20:55

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