20

During development faced up with quite a strange SQL Server behavior. Here we have absolutely the same formula for absolutely the same number. The only difference is how we are getting this number (4.250). From table, temp table, variable table or hardcoded value. Rounding and casting is absolutely the same in all cases.

-- normal table
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[value]
(
[val] [decimal] (5, 3) NOT NULL
) 
INSERT INTO [value] VALUES (4.250 )
SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val FROM [value] AS pr

-- inline query from normal table
SELECT * FROM (SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val FROM [value] AS pr) a

-- record without table
SELECT ROUND(CAST(4.250 * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val

-- table variable
DECLARE @value AS TABLE (
val  [decimal] (5, 3)
);

INSERT INTO @value VALUES (4.250 )

SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val FROM @value

-- temp table
CREATE TABLE #value
(
    val  [decimal] (5, 3)
)
INSERT INTO #value VALUES (4.250 )
SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val FROM #value AS pr

-- all records together
SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val FROM [value] AS pr
UNION ALL
SELECT ROUND(CAST(4.250 * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val
UNION ALL
SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val FROM @value
UNION ALL
SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val FROM #value AS pr

DROP TABLE #value;
DROP TABLE [dbo].[value];

And the results are:

enter image description here

  • FYI - regarding the adding of the new tag, I'm seeing the same behaviour on all versions I have access to, 2008R2 - 2016 – Bridge Aug 17 '17 at 12:13
14

This appears to be because you haven't specified the data type of 4.250 everywhere you have hard coded that value, along with mixing datatypes decimal(5,3) and decimal(15,9) in your table declarations and cast statements.

Note that specifying the same precision everywhere:

-- normal table
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[value]
  (
     [val] DECIMAL(15, 9) NOT NULL
  )

INSERT INTO [value]
SELECT CAST(4.250 AS DECIMAL(15, 9))

SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val
FROM   [value] AS pr

-- inline query from normal table
SELECT *
FROM   (SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val
        FROM   [value] AS pr) a

-- record without table
SELECT ROUND(CAST(CAST(4.250 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)) * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val

-- table variable
DECLARE @value AS TABLE
  (
     val [DECIMAL] (15, 9)
  );

INSERT INTO @value
SELECT CAST(4.250 AS DECIMAL(15, 9))

SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val
FROM   @value

-- temp table
CREATE TABLE #value
  (
     val [DECIMAL] (15, 9)
  )

INSERT INTO #value
SELECT CAST(4.250 AS DECIMAL(15, 9))

SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val
FROM   #value AS pr

-- all records together
SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val
FROM   [value] AS pr
UNION ALL
SELECT ROUND(CAST(CAST(4.250 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)) * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val
UNION ALL
SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val
FROM   @value
UNION ALL
SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val
FROM   #value AS pr

DROP TABLE #value;

DROP TABLE [dbo].[value];

You get the same result for every row:

0.003541667

Further Note:

You can test to see what datatype your hardcoded numeric value is by stuffing it into a variant:

DECLARE @var SQL_VARIANT;

SELECT @var = 4.250

SELECT SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(@var, 'BaseType'),
       SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(@var, 'Precision'),
       SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(@var, 'Scale');

This returns numeric(4,3) on my local SQL Server box. (Numeric and Decimal are the same thing )

Edit #2: Further digging

Taking just the first example:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[value]
(
[val] [decimal] (5, 3) NOT NULL
) 
INSERT INTO [value] VALUES (4.250 )

SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val FROM [value] AS pr

-- inline query from normal table
SELECT * FROM (SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val FROM [value] AS pr) a

DROP TABLE VALUE

Having dug a little further, the execution plans are different - the first statement is being parameterised, whereas the subquery version is not:

execution plans

If you look at the properties window:

enter image description here

It doesn't list the datatypes of these parameters, but doing the same trick with stuffing the values 0.01 and 12 into a variant ends up with datatypes numeric(2,2) and int respectively.

If you cast the hardcoded values in the second statement to those datatypes:

SELECT * FROM (SELECT ROUND(CAST(val * CAST(0.01 AS NUMERIC(2,2)) / CAST(12 AS INT) AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 9) AS val FROM [value] AS pr) a

You get the same result for both statements. Why it has decided to parameterise the select but not the subquery, what the data types of the parameters actually are, and what datatypes the hardcoded values are treated as normally in the second statement...remain a mystery to me. We would probably need to ask someone with internal knowledge of the SQL Server engine.

  • I agree it has to do with datatypes. If you change 12 to 12.0 you also get the same results everywhere (0.003541666). I still don't really understand why an inline query would give a different result though. – HoneyBadger Aug 17 '17 at 8:12
  • I know how get the right results everywhere. You can also multiple val by 0.010000000000 instead of 0.01. However it does not answer why do I have different results when the table definitions are the same? – Dmitrij Kultasev Aug 17 '17 at 8:12
  • @DmitrijKultasev I see what you mean - why does selecting against the table return a different value than when you select from the same statement as a subquery... – Bridge Aug 17 '17 at 8:18
  • 1
    I think you are on the right track with the parameterization. If I set the database to PARAMETERIZATION FORCED, the subquery is still executed without parameters. If I force parameterization by explicitly using 0.01 and 12 as variables, the returned value is again the same. I think SQL Server defines the parameters in a different datatype than expected. I haven't been able to force the result to 0.003541660 though. See here – HoneyBadger Aug 17 '17 at 9:51
  • 1
    @Bridge - this should formalise your findings: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/t-sql/data-types/… . When you use the +, -, *, /, or % arithmetic operators to perform implicit or explicit conversion of int, smallint, tinyint, or bigint constant values to the float, real, decimal or numeric data types, the rules that SQL Server applies when it calculates the data type and precision of the expression results differ depending on whether the query is autoparameterized or not. – Alex Aug 23 '17 at 7:56
11

If I run:

SELECT  CAST(pr.val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)) AS val
,       SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(CAST(pr.val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)), 'BaseType')
FROM    [value] AS pr

Value 0.003541660 is returned.

If I run:

SELECT  CAST(pr.val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)) AS val
FROM    [value] AS pr

Value 0.003541667 is returned.

Smells very much like a bug to me...

edit

Based on the answer by Bridge, I too decided to have a look at the execution plans. Lo and Behold:

SELECT  CAST(pr.val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)) AS val
FROM    [value] AS pr
OPTION (RECOMPILE)


-- inline query from normal table
SELECT  a.val
FROM    (
            SELECT  CAST(pr.val * 0.01 / 12 AS DECIMAL(15, 9)) AS val
            FROM    [value] AS pr
        ) AS a
OPTION (RECOMPILE)

Both queries return 0.003541660. So it appears the reuse of the execution plan is where the 'error' originates. (Note: DBCC FREEPROCCACHE doesn't have the same result!)

Extra note: If I save the execution plans as xml, the files are identical both with and without OPTION (RECOMPILE).

edit:

If I set the database to PARAMETERIZATION FORCED, the subquery is still executed without parameters. If I force parameterization by explicitly using 0.01 and 12 as variables, the returned value is again the same. I think SQL Server defines the parameters in a different datatype than expected. I haven't been able to force the result to 0.003541660 though. This also explains why OPTION(RECOMPILE) results in identical values: If RECOMPILE is used, parameterization is turned off.

  • I agree there appears to be something funky going on - see my latest edit, anything jump out at you? – Bridge Aug 17 '17 at 8:47
  • @Bridge, please see my edit. I think we need someone with more in depth knowledge of the inner machinery of SQL Server – HoneyBadger Aug 17 '17 at 9:14
  • Good catch - too bad I can't upvote twice :) – Bridge Aug 17 '17 at 9:31
  • 4
    @HoneyBadger - see big red warning here: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/t-sql/data-types/… – Alex Aug 23 '17 at 7:57
10
+25

From SQL Server data types page

When you use the +, -, *, /, or % arithmetic operators to perform implicit or explicit conversion of int, smallint, tinyint, or bigint constant values to the float, real, decimal or numeric data types, the rules that SQL Server applies when it calculates the data type and precision of the expression results differ depending on whether the query is autoparameterized or not.

Therefore, similar expressions in queries can sometimes produce different results. When a query is not autoparameterized, the constant value is first converted to numeric, whose precision is just large enough to hold the value of the constant, before converting to the specified data type. For example, the constant value 1 is converted to numeric (1, 0), and the constant value 250 is converted to numeric (3, 0).

When a query is autoparameterized, the constant value is always converted to numeric (10, 0) before converting to the final data type. When the / operator is involved, not only can the result type's precision differ among similar queries, but the result value can differ also. For example, the result value of an autoparameterized query that includes the expression SELECT CAST (1.0 / 7 AS float) will differ from the result value of the same query that is not autoparameterized, because the results of the autoparameterized query will be truncated to fit into the numeric (10, 0) data type.

Note:

numeric (10, 0) is equivalent to INT.

In the example above when both dividend and divisor are whole numbers the type is treated as INT e.g. INT / INT = INT

If on the other hand one of the types is forced to be a "proper" NUMERIC type the expression is treated as NUMERIC( 10, 0 ) / NUMERIC( 10, 0 ) = NUMERIC( 21, 11 ). See: Precision, scale, and Length (Transact-SQL) for explanation of how result types are calculated.

Example:

EXEC sp_describe_first_result_set N'SELECT 1 as a, 7 as b, 1 / 7 AS Result'
EXEC sp_describe_first_result_set N'SELECT 1 as a, CONVERT( NUMERIC( 10, 0 ), 7 ) as b, CONVERT( INT, 1 ) / CONVERT( NUMERIC( 10, 0 ), 7 ) AS a'

Note: NUMERIC data type only has a fixed number of decimal places (scale) to store fractional numbers. This becomes important when the division produces the result with (infinitely) long decimal part e.g. 1 / 3 that has to be truncated to fit the type.

OPs case

The difference in results boils down to whether 12 is treated as INT/ NUMERIC( 10, 0 ) or NUMERIC( 2, 0 ) as this will directly affect the precision (number of decimal places) of the result: decimal(19,16) or decimal(11,8). I have removed CAST and ROUND functions to show actual types used in the calculation.

Input parameters:

-- Note: on my machine "parameterization" option does not have any effect on below example
SELECT CONVERT( decimal (5, 3), 4.250 ) AS a, -- the type is explicitly defined in the table
    0.01 AS b -- always becomes NUMERIC( 2, 2 )
    12 AS c -- will either become NUMERIC( 2, 0 ) or NUMERIC( 10, 0 ) / INT
EXEC sp_describe_first_result_set N'SELECT CONVERT( decimal (5, 3), 4.250 ) AS a, 0.01 AS b, 12 AS c'

In the above case it is treated as INT.

You can "force" it to be treated as NUMERIC( 2, 0 ):

-- Note: on my machine "parameterization" option does not have any effect on below example
SELECT 0.01 AS b, ( 12 * 0.01 ) AS c
EXEC sp_describe_first_result_set N'SELECT ( 12 * 0.01 ) AS c'
-- Result: 0.12 numeric(5,2)

Formula for calculating product data type: p1 + p2 + 1, s1 + s2.

To find out the starting type solve: 5 = x + 2 + 1, 2 = y + 2 to get 2, 0 i.e. NUMERIC( 2, 0 )

Output type of the result will be as follows:

-- 12 is NUMERIC( 10, 0 ) / INT
SELECT CONVERT( decimal (5, 3), 4.250 ) * CONVERT( decimal (2, 2), 0.01 ) / CONVERT( decimal(10, 0), 12 )
EXEC sp_describe_first_result_set N'SELECT CONVERT( decimal (5, 3), 4.250 ) * CONVERT( decimal (2, 2), 0.01 ) / CONVERT( decimal(10, 0), 12 )'
-- Result: 0.0035416666666666 decimal(19,16) -> rounding to 9 decimal places: 0.003541667

-- 12 is NUMERIC( 2, 0 )
SELECT CONVERT( decimal (5, 3), 4.250 ) * CONVERT( decimal (2, 2), 0.01 ) / CONVERT( decimal(2, 0), 12 )
EXEC sp_describe_first_result_set N'SELECT CONVERT( decimal (5, 3), 4.250 ) * CONVERT( decimal (2, 2), 0.01 ) / CONVERT( decimal(2, 0), 12 )'
-- Result: 0.00354166 decimal(11,8) -> rounding to 9 decimal places: 0.003541660

To see how the result types are calculated see Precision, scale, and Length (Transact-SQL).

Solution

Cast your literals and / or intermediate results to the desired type to avoid surprises e.g.

SELECT CONVERT( decimal( 12, 7 ), CONVERT( decimal (5, 3), 4.250 ) * CONVERT( decimal (2, 2), 0.01 )) / CONVERT( decimal(2, 0), 12 )
EXEC sp_describe_first_result_set N'SELECT CONVERT( decimal( 12, 7 ), CONVERT( decimal (5, 3), 4.250 ) * CONVERT( decimal (2, 2), 0.01 )) / CONVERT( decimal(2, 0), 12 )'
-- Result: 0.0035416666 decimal(15,10) -> rounding to 9 decimal places: 0.003541660

Summary:

This question is a complex case of: Division of 2 numbers using CAST function in SQL server 2008R2 . With the complexity stemming from the fact that SQL Server may use different data types in different scenarios.

A word on simple parameterization

I could find only one article (http://www.sqlteam.com) on simple parameterization that actualy mentions when/when not a query would be auto parameterized.

Note: The article is from 2007 so may not be current.

SQL Server places the following restrictions on what types of queries can be parameterized using Simple Parameterization:

  • Single Table – No JOINs
  • No IN clause
  • No UNION
  • No SELECT INTO
  • No Query Hints
  • No DISTINCT or TOP
  • No full-text, linked servers or table variables
  • No sub-queries
  • No GROUP BY
  • No <> in WHERE clause
  • No functions
  • No DELETE or UPDATE with FROM clause
  • Parameter values can’t affect plan

TechNet - Simple Parameterization article has no information.

TechNet - Forced Parameterization does have some information but it applies to Forced Parameterization

  • Very informative answer. However I tried to use sp_describe_first_result_set for the first 2 examples (select val from table and select * from (select val from table)) and I get identical outputs, but the result of the queries is different – Dmitrij Kultasev Aug 24 '17 at 7:33
  • @DmitrijKultasev - you need to remove CAST and ROUND from your example to see the actual type. Perhaps I did not make it explicit enough in my answer but the difference in result comes from the difference in scale of the result type before you apply the final cast. – Alex Aug 24 '17 at 22:13
  • @DmitrijKultasev - I have updated my answer hopefully it will clear up confusion. – Alex Aug 24 '17 at 23:15
  • I can understand why do I have this effect starting from the 3rd example in my question. However it does not explain to me why select * from tbl gives different result than select * from (select * from tbl). – Dmitrij Kultasev Aug 28 '17 at 8:15
  • 1
    @HoneyBadger - I checked the article and also checked OP's sample code: for the first two case both plans are "TRIVIAL". It looks like the article is incomplete/misleading. I have found a slightly better article: daleburnett.com/2011/08/… . Will need go over both articles in greater detail before I will update the answer again. – Alex Aug 28 '17 at 12:54

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