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I am doing a project in Qt and there is an object QPainter which is declared as :

 QPainter painter(this);

Where this points to the present class. My problem is that I need to declare this object such that it is accessible to the entire class functions.

If I declare it inside the constructor then its scope is not valid for other functions, and I cannot declare outside all function in my .cpp file as this variable doesn't make any sense.

So how can I declare my object such that it is accessible to all the functions?

Edit : Painter Code :

void MainWindow :: paintEvent(QPaintEvent * e)
{
    QMainWindow::paintEvent(e);
        if(1)
        {
           QPainter painter(this);
           QPen paintpen(Qt::red);
           paintpen.setWidth(5);
           QPoint p1;
           p1.setX(mFirstX);
           p1.setY(mFirstY);
           painter.setPen(paintpen);
           painter.drawPoint(p1);
         }

}

Mouse Event Code :

void MainWindow :: mousePressEvent(QMouseEvent *e)
{
    mFirstX=0;
    mFirstY=0;
    mFirstClick=true;
    mpaintflag=false;

    if(e->button() == Qt::LeftButton)
            {
                //store 1st point
                if(1)
                {
                    mFirstX = e->x();
                    mFirstY = e->y();
                    mFirstClick = false;
                    mpaintflag = true;
                    qDebug() << "First image's coordinates" << mFirstX << "," << mFirstY ;
                    update();

                }

            }
}

PROBLEM : I want to create the point but I don't want it to disappear from the widget(mainWindow). Here since the object is created during the paintEvent method each time the point that I am drawing is disappearing when the next point is drawn.

And if I declare it outside the paintEvent then I get the following error:

 QWidget::paintEngine: Should no longer be called  
 QPainter::begin: Paint device returned engine == 0, type: 1  
 QPainter::setPen: Painter not active
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  • 1
    Pass it (by reference) to the functions that need it.
    – Mat
    Aug 17 '17 at 7:55
  • 1
    @arqam Using initializers in the constructor? Check the answer from Xatyrian Aug 17 '17 at 7:59
  • 1
    Then declaring QPainter globally won't be the proper solution (if at all) to your problem. The point disappears because the widget is redrawn, not because the QPainter is destroyed. Tell me more what you would like to achieve and probably I could find a way to help you.
    – scopchanov
    Aug 17 '17 at 9:36
  • 1
    I see. I would prepare and keep a buffer of points I would like to draw and make QPainter draw each one of them.
    – scopchanov
    Aug 17 '17 at 9:38
  • 1
    Done. Check out my answer.
    – scopchanov
    Aug 17 '17 at 10:09
1

In general, declaring the QPainter object globally is not a good idea. It is better to construct it in the QWidget::paintEvent (where it will be active) and, as @Mat said, pass it (by reference) to the functions that need it.

In your particular case the point disappears because the widget is redrawn, not because the QPainter is destroyed. So the strategy should be to create and manage a buffer of points. Add a point to the buffer in a mouse event, e.g. QWidget::mousePressEvent (there do some management too, e.g. limiting the number of points) and in the paint event - paint all the points from the buffer.

Here is an oversimplified example which could easily be adapted for your specific purpose:

MainWindow.h

#ifndef MAINWINDOW_H
#define MAINWINDOW_H

#include <QMainWindow>
#include <QMouseEvent>
#include <QPaintEvent>
#include <QPainter>

class MainWindow : public QMainWindow
{
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    explicit MainWindow(QWidget *parent = nullptr);

protected:
    void mousePressEvent(QMouseEvent *event);
    void paintEvent(QPaintEvent *event);

private:
    QList<QPoint> m_points;
};

#endif // MAINWINDOW_H

MainWindow.cpp

#include "MainWindow.h"

MainWindow::MainWindow(QWidget *parent) : QMainWindow(parent)
{
    QPalette p = QPalette();

    p.setColor(QPalette::Window, Qt::white);

    setPalette(p);
    setAutoFillBackground(true);
    resize(400, 400);
}

void MainWindow::mousePressEvent(QMouseEvent *event)
{
    m_points.append(event->pos());

    update();
}

void MainWindow::paintEvent(QPaintEvent *event)
{
    QPainter painter(this);

    painter.setClipping(true);
    painter.setClipRect(event->rect());

    painter.setPen(QPen(Qt::red, 5));

    foreach (QPoint point, m_points) { painter.drawPoint(point); }
}
5
  • 1
    @arqam Well, the people are advising you how to declare a data member of a class, which in the general case is true, but not with QPainter and your particular case. Anyway, I am glad you have your problem solved.
    – scopchanov
    Aug 17 '17 at 10:23
  • 1
    It is always a good idea to read the documentation, which is quite clear on the subject: doc.qt.io/qt-4.8/qpainter.html#details - Warning: When the paintdevice is a widget, QPainter can only be used inside a paintEvent() function or in a function called by paintEvent(); that is unless the Qt::WA_PaintOutsidePaintEvent widget attribute is set. On Mac OS X and Windows, you can only paint in a paintEvent() function regardless of this attribute's setting.
    – dtech
    Aug 17 '17 at 10:56
  • Yeah, the first paragraph of the documentation for QPainter doesn't look like a probable place to find it ;)
    – dtech
    Aug 17 '17 at 10:59
  • That's true and fine, however I cannot shake the feeling people become too dependent on SO and as such neglect their critical thinking abilities :)
    – dtech
    Aug 17 '17 at 11:05
  • Let us continue this discussion in chat.
    – scopchanov
    Aug 17 '17 at 11:06
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That's what class attributes are for :

class MyObject : public QObject {
    Q_OBJECT

public:
    MyObject(QObject *parent = 0) : QObject(parent), painter_(this) {
        // Other things if you need them
    }

    void aFunction() {
        // You can use painter_  here !!
    }
private :
    QPainter painter_;
}
5
  • I declared the painter object in the constructor MainWindow::MainWindow(QWidget *parent) : QMainWindow(parent), ui(new Ui::MainWindow),painter(this) { but it gives me this error message : QPainter::setPen: Painter not active I have updated the question with the painter code also.
    – arqam
    Aug 17 '17 at 8:03
  • @dtech Can you please have a look at the edited question?
    – arqam
    Aug 17 '17 at 9:44
  • A QPainter object is only active in a paint event handler and the functions called by it. So although in the general case your answer is correct, in this particular case "// You can use painter_ here !!" is wrong.
    – scopchanov
    Aug 17 '17 at 10:49
  • @scopchanov this is only true if you paint on a widget. If the paint device is an image or a pixmap you can paint on it from wherever you want.
    – dtech
    Aug 17 '17 at 10:54
  • @dtech I agree. That is why I've said "in this particular case", as here goes about painting on QWidget.
    – scopchanov
    Aug 17 '17 at 10:55
0

In the private access specifier of your main window class in mainWindow.h, you could write this line

QPainter *painterPointer

creating a pointer accessible in all MainWindow slots. You could use that painterPointer as though it were any painter pointer initialised in any slot. However if you wanted to use this pointer in a developer defined function or method outside of the MainWindow class, you would have to pass the pointer as a reference (or pointer to the pointer).

might have to include a line similar to this in the MainWindow Constructor

painterPointer = new QPainter(this);
5
  • If you wanted to use the painter on a pixmap for example, you could write QPixmap *pixmap; in the private access specifier and then painterPointer = new QPainter(pixmap); in the mainWindow constructor Aug 17 '17 at 15:31
  • When should new QPainter(this); be destroyed?
    – scopchanov
    Aug 17 '17 at 20:34
  • it will be destroyed when the window is closed Aug 17 '17 at 22:04
  • Most certainly this is not the way it is intendet to be. The documentation is pretty clear about it - create a painter, paint and destroy it.
    – scopchanov
    Aug 17 '17 at 22:06
  • It may not be the intended way, but it is a valid way. There is a reason for begin() and end(), so it may actually be one of the intended ways. End() is usually called by the destructor, but this implies that there is the possibility to free up memory used by the painter, while also allowing you to use the same painter in different member functions of the MainWindow class. Aug 17 '17 at 22:32

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