256

I have two expressions of type Expression<Func<T, bool>> and I want to take to OR, AND or NOT of these and get a new expression of the same type

Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr1;
Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr2;

...

//how to do this (the code below will obviously not work)
Expression<Func<T, bool>> andExpression = expr AND expr2
350

Well, you can use Expression.AndAlso / OrElse etc to combine logical expressions, but the problem is the parameters; are you working with the same ParameterExpression in expr1 and expr2? If so, it is easier:

var body = Expression.AndAlso(expr1.Body, expr2.Body);
var lambda = Expression.Lambda<Func<T,bool>>(body, expr1.Parameters[0]);

This also works well to negate a single operation:

static Expression<Func<T, bool>> Not<T>(
    this Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr)
{
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(
        Expression.Not(expr.Body), expr.Parameters[0]);
}

Otherwise, depending on the LINQ provider, you might be able to combine them with Invoke:

// OrElse is very similar...
static Expression<Func<T, bool>> AndAlso<T>(
    this Expression<Func<T, bool>> left,
    Expression<Func<T, bool>> right)
{
    var param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "x");
    var body = Expression.AndAlso(
            Expression.Invoke(left, param),
            Expression.Invoke(right, param)
        );
    var lambda = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(body, param);
    return lambda;
}

Somewhere, I have got some code that re-writes an expression-tree replacing nodes to remove the need for Invoke, but it is quite lengthy (and I can't remember where I left it...)


Generalized version that picks the simplest route:

static Expression<Func<T, bool>> AndAlso<T>(
    this Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr1,
    Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr2)
{
    // need to detect whether they use the same
    // parameter instance; if not, they need fixing
    ParameterExpression param = expr1.Parameters[0];
    if (ReferenceEquals(param, expr2.Parameters[0]))
    {
        // simple version
        return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(
            Expression.AndAlso(expr1.Body, expr2.Body), param);
    }
    // otherwise, keep expr1 "as is" and invoke expr2
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(
        Expression.AndAlso(
            expr1.Body,
            Expression.Invoke(expr2, param)), param);
}

Starting from .NET 4.0, there is the ExpressionVisitor class which allows you to build expressions that are EF safe.

    public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> AndAlso<T>(
        this Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr1,
        Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr2)
    {
        var parameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof (T));

        var leftVisitor = new ReplaceExpressionVisitor(expr1.Parameters[0], parameter);
        var left = leftVisitor.Visit(expr1.Body);

        var rightVisitor = new ReplaceExpressionVisitor(expr2.Parameters[0], parameter);
        var right = rightVisitor.Visit(expr2.Body);

        return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(
            Expression.AndAlso(left, right), parameter);
    }



    private class ReplaceExpressionVisitor
        : ExpressionVisitor
    {
        private readonly Expression _oldValue;
        private readonly Expression _newValue;

        public ReplaceExpressionVisitor(Expression oldValue, Expression newValue)
        {
            _oldValue = oldValue;
            _newValue = newValue;
        }

        public override Expression Visit(Expression node)
        {
            if (node == _oldValue)
                return _newValue;
            return base.Visit(node);
        }
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    +1 the generalized version works like a charm, I used And instead of andalso, I thought linq to sql doesn't support andalso? – Maslow Sep 4 '09 at 13:57
  • 2
    @Maslow - here's a rewriter that can inline the trees to save Invoke: stackoverflow.com/questions/1717444/… – Marc Gravell Mar 19 '11 at 21:12
  • 1
    @Aron now look at the date: the .NET framework visitor (ExpressionVisitor) did not exist back then; I have a related example on stackoverflow from a similar date where it implements the visitor manually: it is a lot of code. – Marc Gravell Aug 13 '14 at 7:09
  • 1
    @MarkGravell, I'm using your first solution to combine my expressions, and everything is working fine even in entityframework, So what would the benefits of using the last solution be? – johnny 5 Aug 3 '17 at 0:08
  • 1
    @user3071284 because parsing expression trees is hard, so sometimes we need to help them out; try the expression-visitor version at the bottom – Marc Gravell Jul 7 at 17:56
64

You can use Expression.AndAlso / OrElse to combine logical expressions, but you have to make sure the ParameterExpressions are the same.

I was having trouble with EF and the PredicateBuilder so I made my own without resorting to Invoke, that I could use like this:

var filterC = filterA.And(filterb);

Source code for my PredicateBuilder:

public static class PredicateBuilder {

    public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> And<T>(this Expression<Func<T, bool>> a, Expression<Func<T, bool>> b) {    

        ParameterExpression p = a.Parameters[0];

        SubstExpressionVisitor visitor = new SubstExpressionVisitor();
        visitor.subst[b.Parameters[0]] = p;

        Expression body = Expression.AndAlso(a.Body, visitor.Visit(b.Body));
        return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(body, p);
    }

    public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> Or<T>(this Expression<Func<T, bool>> a, Expression<Func<T, bool>> b) {    

        ParameterExpression p = a.Parameters[0];

        SubstExpressionVisitor visitor = new SubstExpressionVisitor();
        visitor.subst[b.Parameters[0]] = p;

        Expression body = Expression.OrElse(a.Body, visitor.Visit(b.Body));
        return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(body, p);
    }   
}

And the utility class to substitute the parameters in a lambda:

internal class SubstExpressionVisitor : System.Linq.Expressions.ExpressionVisitor {
        public Dictionary<Expression, Expression> subst = new Dictionary<Expression, Expression>();

        protected override Expression VisitParameter(ParameterExpression node) {
            Expression newValue;
            if (subst.TryGetValue(node, out newValue)) {
                return newValue;
            }
            return node;
        }
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • This solution was the only one that allowed me to have x => x.Property == Value combined with arg => arg.Property2 == Value. Major props, a little terse and confusing but it works so I'm not going to complain. Kudos Adam :-) – VulgarBinary Dec 12 '12 at 20:38
  • This is a great solution. – Aaron Stainback May 13 '14 at 23:26
  • Adam, this solved a very annoying problem I was having using the SharePoint Client Object model's Linq provider - thanks for posting it. – Christopher McAtackney Jul 9 '14 at 14:30
  • This worked for me! I had searched for a variety of solutions as well as predicate builder and nothing worked until this. Thank you! – tokyo0709 Aug 1 '16 at 20:10
  • This is a wonderful piece of code. I couldn't find a place to adjust the code, copy-paste and that's it :) – Tolga Evcimen Feb 16 '17 at 13:04
20

If you provider does not support Invoke and you need to combine two expression, you can use an ExpressionVisitor to replace the parameter in the second expression by the parameter in the first expression.

class ParameterUpdateVisitor : ExpressionVisitor
{
    private ParameterExpression _oldParameter;
    private ParameterExpression _newParameter;

    public ParameterUpdateVisitor(ParameterExpression oldParameter, ParameterExpression newParameter)
    {
        _oldParameter = oldParameter;
        _newParameter = newParameter;
    }

    protected override Expression VisitParameter(ParameterExpression node)
    {
        if (object.ReferenceEquals(node, _oldParameter))
            return _newParameter;

        return base.VisitParameter(node);
    }
}

static Expression<Func<T, bool>> UpdateParameter<T>(
    Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr,
    ParameterExpression newParameter)
{
    var visitor = new ParameterUpdateVisitor(expr.Parameters[0], newParameter);
    var body = visitor.Visit(expr.Body);

    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(body, newParameter);
}

[TestMethod]
public void ExpressionText()
{
    string text = "test";

    Expression<Func<Coco, bool>> expr1 = p => p.Item1.Contains(text);
    Expression<Func<Coco, bool>> expr2 = q => q.Item2.Contains(text);
    Expression<Func<Coco, bool>> expr3 = UpdateParameter(expr2, expr1.Parameters[0]);

    var expr4 = Expression.Lambda<Func<Recording, bool>>(
        Expression.OrElse(expr1.Body, expr3.Body), expr1.Parameters[0]);

    var func = expr4.Compile();

    Assert.IsTrue(func(new Coco { Item1 = "caca", Item2 = "test pipi" }));
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This solved my particular problem where the other solution resulted in the same exception. Thanks. – Shaun Wilson Mar 7 '13 at 23:49
  • 1
    This is a great solution. – Aaron Stainback May 13 '14 at 23:25
7

Nothing new here but married this answer with this answer and slightly refactored it so that even I understand what's going on:

public static class ExpressionExtensions
{
    public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> AndAlso<T>(this Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr1, Expression<Func<T, bool>> expr2)
    {
        ParameterExpression parameter1 = expr1.Parameters[0];
        var visitor = new ReplaceParameterVisitor(expr2.Parameters[0], parameter1);
        var body2WithParam1 = visitor.Visit(expr2.Body);
        return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(Expression.AndAlso(expr1.Body, body2WithParam1), parameter1);
    }

    private class ReplaceParameterVisitor : ExpressionVisitor
    {
        private ParameterExpression _oldParameter;
        private ParameterExpression _newParameter;

        public ReplaceParameterVisitor(ParameterExpression oldParameter, ParameterExpression newParameter)
        {
            _oldParameter = oldParameter;
            _newParameter = newParameter;
        }

        protected override Expression VisitParameter(ParameterExpression node)
        {
            if (ReferenceEquals(node, _oldParameter))
                return _newParameter;

            return base.VisitParameter(node);
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • I was having difficulty grasping the concept, and your melding of a couple other answers helped it click for me. Thanks! – Kevin M. Lapio Apr 17 at 2:03
2

I needed to achieve the same results, but using something more generic (as the type was not known). Thanks to marc's answer I finally figured out what I was trying to achieve:

    public static LambdaExpression CombineOr(Type sourceType, LambdaExpression exp, LambdaExpression newExp) 
    {
        var parameter = Expression.Parameter(sourceType);

        var leftVisitor = new ReplaceExpressionVisitor(exp.Parameters[0], parameter);
        var left = leftVisitor.Visit(exp.Body);

        var rightVisitor = new ReplaceExpressionVisitor(newExp.Parameters[0], parameter);
        var right = rightVisitor.Visit(newExp.Body);

        var delegateType = typeof(Func<,>).MakeGenericType(sourceType, typeof(bool));
        return Expression.Lambda(delegateType, Expression.Or(left, right), parameter);
    }
| improve this answer | |
1

I suggest one more improvement to PredicateBuilder and ExpressionVisitor solutions. I called it UnifyParametersByName and you can find it in MIT library of mine: LinqExprHelper. It allows for combining arbitary lambda expressions. Usually the questions are asked about predicate expression, but this idea extends to projection expressions as well.

The following code employs a method ExprAdres which creates a complicated parametrized expression, using inline lambda. This complicated expression is coded only once, and then reused, thanks to the LinqExprHelper mini-library.

public IQueryable<UbezpExt> UbezpFull
{
    get
    {
        System.Linq.Expressions.Expression<
            Func<UBEZPIECZONY, UBEZP_ADRES, UBEZP_ADRES, UbezpExt>> expr =
            (u, parAdrM, parAdrZ) => new UbezpExt
            {
                Ub = u,
                AdrM = parAdrM,
                AdrZ = parAdrZ,
            };

        // From here an expression builder ExprAdres is called.
        var expr2 = expr
            .ReplacePar("parAdrM", ExprAdres("M").Body)
            .ReplacePar("parAdrZ", ExprAdres("Z").Body);
        return UBEZPIECZONY.Select((Expression<Func<UBEZPIECZONY, UbezpExt>>)expr2);
    }
}

And this is the subexpression building code:

public static Expression<Func<UBEZPIECZONY, UBEZP_ADRES>> ExprAdres(string sTyp)
{
    return u => u.UBEZP_ADRES.Where(a => a.TYP_ADRESU == sTyp)
        .OrderByDescending(a => a.DATAOD).FirstOrDefault();
}

What I tried to achieve was to perform parametrized queries without need to copy-paste and with ability to use inline lambdas, which are so pretty. Without all these helper-expression stuff, I would be forced to create whole query in one go.

| improve this answer | |
-8

I think this works fine, isn't it ?

Func<T, bool> expr1 = (x => x.Att1 == "a");
Func<T, bool> expr2 = (x => x.Att2 == "b");
Func<T, bool> expr1ANDexpr2 = (x => expr1(x) && expr2(x));
Func<T, bool> expr1ORexpr2 = (x => expr1(x) || expr2(x));
Func<T, bool> NOTexpr1 = (x => !expr1(x));
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    this cannot be used in Linq to SQL for instance – Romain Vergnory May 12 '16 at 9:47

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