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Is the use of templates better than basic data types in terms of memory allocation and management?

closed as unclear what you're asking by eerorika, Bo Persson, Caleth, Rabbid76, Valentin Aug 17 '17 at 22:07

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    Is this a C++ question? – doctorlove Aug 17 '17 at 11:16
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    templates dont allocate memory, only if you instantiate it, but then it is not clear how this is different from "basic types" – formerlyknownas_463035818 Aug 17 '17 at 11:27
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    C++ templates and Swift generics are completely different beasts. – molbdnilo Aug 17 '17 at 11:33
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    Which are better: bricks or blueprints? – Caleth Aug 17 '17 at 11:38
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    At least share one situation where you feel that you can replace one with the other. – molbdnilo Aug 17 '17 at 11:45
2

Just in short:

templates - a way to write code once in a generic way, and in compilation time the compiler will generate code according to the template, if you used the templatic code.

example:

  #include <iostream>


template<typename T>
T MultiplyByFive(T _val)
{
    return _val * 5;
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << MultiplyByFive(5) << " " << MultiplyByFive(5.5) << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

In this example, the compiler will generate two MultiplyByFive functions. One for integer and one for double. The output will therefore be:

25 27.5

That's because these functions have been called. Now we have two function in the code (generated by the compiler)

int MultiplyByFive(int _val)
{
    return _val * 5;
}


double MultiplyByFive(double _val)
{
    return _val * 5;
}

We didn't code them directly, but the compiler did according to our template.

Memory allocation has little to do with template. Dynamic memory allocation is determined in run time (in c++ by the new operator). Static and local variable are determined in compile time, but it has nothing to do with generating code.

If I didn't understand the question, you're more then welcome to clarify.

  • Wow! I was curious, That if we apply templates/generics to our functions rather than any specific data type. Which one is recommended in terms of memory allocation and management. – Ashish Kapoor Aug 17 '17 at 12:02
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    I'm not sure I understand. Allocation is about DATA. Templates are about CODE, functions etc. You can use templates to do manipulation on data but it's usually just to show that you can. What are you thinking about? give an example – Noam Ohana Aug 17 '17 at 12:05
  • you actually cleared my doubt. :D Thanks buddy. I wish I could have given an up vote to your reply. – Ashish Kapoor Aug 17 '17 at 12:33
  • If you like the answer, you can choose "accept the answer" by checking the gray check mark near my answer and making it green. – Noam Ohana Aug 17 '17 at 12:47
  • Done! Once again thanks for your efforts. ☺️ Much appreciated. – Ashish Kapoor Aug 17 '17 at 12:49

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