12

This question already has an answer here:

public class WrapperTest {
    static {
        print(10);
    }

    static void print(int x) {
        System.out.println(x);
        System.exit(0);
    }
}

In the above code System.exit(0) is used to stop the program. What argument does that method take? Why do we gave it as 0. Can anyone explain the concept?

marked as duplicate by Mark Rotteveel java Jul 15 '17 at 9:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

29

From the JAVA Documentation:

The argument serves as a status code; by convention, a nonzero status code indicates abnormal termination.

And Wikipedia adds additional information.

  • perfect answer... really helpfull. thanks alot – Saksham Goyal Dec 18 '16 at 11:51
7

It's the return value that the Java process will report to the calling process.

It hasn't really got a precise definition, but the usual convention is that 0 means success and any non-zero value represents a failure.

  • 2
    this answer is already given above... why did you post a duplicate? – Saksham Goyal Dec 18 '16 at 11:52
3

The argument is the return code which the java process will return (0 means "successful"). It can be used when a Java program is a part of a batch script, or by build tools such as Ant.

  • this answer is already given above... why did you post a duplicate? – Saksham Goyal Dec 18 '16 at 11:52
  • 2
    @SakshamGoyal If you look at the timestamp you will see that 1) that was almost 8 years ago and 2) my answer was submitted 2 and 3 minutes after the others. Most likely what happened was that I had opened the question page at a time when the other answers did not exist yet. – Michael Borgwardt Dec 18 '16 at 20:35
3

Have a look here

The argument serves as a status code; by convention, a nonzero status code indicates abnormal termination.

  • this answer is already given above... why did you post a duplicate? – Saksham Goyal Dec 18 '16 at 11:52

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