1

Please explain what is the logic behind this two types of behaviour to understand easily.

var a = 10;
function foo(){
    a = 20;
}
foo();
console.log(a);

Prints---> a = 20;

var a = 10;
function foo(a){
        a = 20;
}
foo();
console.log(a);

Prints---> a = 10;

1
  • Scopes. function foo first checks in its scope if 'a' is defined or not, if not checks in outer scope..and so on
    – Avinash
    Aug 17 '17 at 11:48
1

Because of the scope

In Javascript, when you assign a parameter in a function you define it in the scope of that function, regardless if a variable already exists with the name in the outer/global scope.

Update:

It is worth mentioning that with ES6's arrow functions you could still access the outer var if your function was defined in a parent class or function, using the this keyword.

Example

class Bar {

    this.a = 10;

    this.foo = function(a) {
        this.a = 20;    
    };

    this.foo2 = (a) => {
        this.a = 20;
    };

}

Not exactly the same but it is about scopes

1

Check the following code snippet

var a =10;
var b = a;
function foo(a){
        // a here woukd refer to the parameter a and not the global variable, since it got overridden 
        console.log(a, b);
        a= 20;
}
foo();
// prints the global variable a
console.log(a);

function bar(){
        console.log(a, b);
        // overrides the global variable a
        a = 20;
}

bar();
// prints the global variable a
console.log(a);

1

the first one is because of global scope

var a =10; function foo(){ a= 20; }

here varieble a is accesed globaly and updated from inside the function global varieble can access every place

in the 2nd example just passing a referece of varieble a as a parameter and inside the function the recived parameter value get changed

var a =10;
function foo(a){
 a= 20;
 console.log(a)
}
foo();
console.log(a);

please run the second example of code in console then you can understand the change.

1

In the first example a in the function is replacing the first declaration of a outside the function because you're not scoping it locally with var (or let or const).

In the second example the function accepts a as an argument so it becomes scoped locally to the function. Note that this occurs even if a isn't actually passed into the function (and is therefore undefined).

A good article on scope and context that might be of some use to you.

0

In javascript, function variables has its own scope, if you used var,let,const or using variable as provided in formal parameters in function. if you don't use any of above variable's scope will be global.

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