2

I am currently working on making a responsive website accessible and I wonder whether a blind person who opens the page on a smartphone will be able to open the hidden menu somehow, or if he/she "sees" it anyway - read by the screen reader?

My "Hamburger menu" has a structure like this:

<div class="menu-icon">Click here to open or close the menu</div>
<nav id="navigation" role="navigation" tabindex="0" >
    <ul>
       <li><a href="...">...</a></li>
       <li><a href="...">...</a></li>
       <li><a href="...">...</a></li>
       <li><a href="...">...</a></li>
       <li><a href="...">...</a></li>
    </ul>
</nav>

The related CSS is as follows (first the general rules, then the media queries for mobile):

.menu-icon {
  display: none;
}
nav {
  display: block;
}
@media only screen and (max-width: 850px) {
  .menu-icon {
    display: block;
    position: absolute;
    right: 15px;
    top: 10px;
    z-index: 2;
    width: 32px;
    height: 32px;
    background-image: url(images/menu-icon.png);
    background-size: 100% auto;
    background-position: 0px 0px;
    text-indent: -5000px;
  }   
  nav {
    display: none;
  }
}

And here's the relevant jQuery:

jQuery('.menu-icon').on('click', function () {
  jQuery('nav').slideToggle(300);
});

All this works as expected, but I am wondering how a mobile device with activated screen reader will present this to the user and let him/her control it:

  • Will he/she be able to "click" the .menu-icon div somehow to ge access to the menu?

    If not, will the following CSS (which follows after the media queries for mobile) make the menu "visible" to the screenreader the same way as on a desktop screen?:

-

@media speech {
  .menu-icon {
    display: none;
  }
  nav {
    display: block !important;
  }
}

I know some will say "just try it", but it's really hard to test if you are not used to handle a screenreader on a regular basis, especially on mobile (plus every screenreader acts a bit different...). The mobile simulation mode in the browser tools (on desktop) doesn't help here...

0

A solution is to include a visually hidden text like 'open menu' in the element triggering the open (usually an a tag), and add the attribute role="button" to the trigger. Also the a tag href will be the anchor to the nav id.

<a href="#nav" role="button" class="js_open_trigger">open menu</a>
<nav id="nav">......</nav>

Then you would need media queries to show/hide the desktop or mobile parts.

  • I kind of had that already, but without the button role: My div .menu-icon apart from a background-image showing the icon also contains some text which is made invisible by text-indent: -5000px. But I now added role="button" and a tabindex to that DIV, and that way it's possible to focus it and "click" it using the according key combination (which wasn't before), which makes the menu visible. Thank you very much for your help! – Johannes Aug 18 '17 at 0:00
3

I would also add an aria-expanded label to your menu button. In traditional screen readers, this information is relayed to the user letting him / her know the current state of the menu: expanded or collapsed. Also, if you stick with using the <div>, make sure you set its role, type and tabindex.

<div class="menu-icon" role="button" type="button" tabindex="0" aria-expanded="false">Click here to open or close the menu</div>
<nav id="navigation" role="navigation" tabindex="0" >
    ...
</nav>

You can then change the value of aria-expanded by modifying your existing jQuery code slightly:

jQuery('.menu-icon').on('click', function () {
    jQuery('nav').slideToggle(300)
    jQuery(this).attr('aria-expanded', function(i, attr) {
        // Returning whether the attribute is equal to false is the same as inverting it
        return attr === 'false'
    })
})
  • Thank you for that suggestion! But something is wrong, probably at my side: The jQuery addition should change the "aria-expanded" value of .menu-icon, right? But it doesn't when I try it. Hmm... – Johannes Aug 18 '17 at 0:15
  • What is that i in the function parameters for? – Johannes Aug 18 '17 at 0:16
  • Okay, found it: Has to be jQuery(this).attr("aria-expanded", function(i, attr) { ... etc. in the third line. Now it works. – Johannes Aug 18 '17 at 0:22
  • You're right, sorry for the confusion! I'll correct it in my answer. But I'm glad you were able to figure it out! – heyitsjhu Aug 18 '17 at 16:00
  • Also, the i is the index position. You can read more about it here: api.jquery.com/attr/#attr-attributeName-function – heyitsjhu Aug 18 '17 at 16:01
1

You could add the button role on your div and a tabindex but the best thing is to use the <button> tag.

You also have to remove the tabindex from your nav and avoid giving the redundant role="navigation"

<button class="menu-icon">Click here to open or close the menu</button>
<nav id="navigation">
    <?php
        $arguments = array(
            'theme-location' => 'main menu',
            'container' => ''
        );
        wp_nav_menu($arguments);
    ?>
</nav>

The @media speech is useless. No actual screenreader use it.

Also, remember, that you should set the aria-hidden attribute on the nav depending if its visibility for assistive technologies which might access directly the dom.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.