1

To define a custom web component, we can extend an ES6 class to get access to the element's lifecycle reactions.

class HelloElement extends HTMLElement {
  // Monitor the 'name' attribute for changes.
  static get observedAttributes() {return ['name']; }

  // Respond to attribute changes.
  attributeChangedCallback(attr, oldValue, newValue) {
    if (attr == 'name') {
      this.textContent = `Hello, ${newValue}`;
    }
  }
}

// Define the new element
customElements.define('hello-element', HelloElement);

What is the ES5 way of doing the equivalent?

10
  • Consider using composition instead of inheritance. Even with the new capabilities in ES6, sometimes composition is still a better solution.
    – spanky
    Aug 18, 2017 at 2:49
  • 1
    Your title doesn't match your question body. Do you want to know how to extend classes (defined with ES6 syntax) with ES5 syntax, or do you want to know how the prototype inheritance was done with ES5?
    – Bergi
    Aug 18, 2017 at 2:51
  • 1
    @spanky, Agreed. The reason for the questions is because I'm intending to use a functional compile-to-JS language for a project and am considering using web components. I don't yet know how if the language (ReasonML) can compile to ES6 classes, and was wondering if there was an ES5 way to do the equivalent. I am under the impression that ES6 classes are not a new feature, but rather a syntactical sugar over ES5 prototypical inheritance. Aug 18, 2017 at 2:53
  • 2
    I could probably use Babel - this Aug 18, 2017 at 3:02
  • 1
    @guest271314 Not yet. According to the Bucklescript manual, the output is ES5 so it seems that it can't currently compile to ES6 classes. bucklescript.github.io/bucklescript/Manual.html Aug 18, 2017 at 3:03

4 Answers 4

12

Based on your comments I assume you mean ES6 syntax, and are allowing ES6-defined functions that Custom Elements-supporting browsers also support.

To simulate the default ES6 constructor that calls super(), we can use Reflect.construct to invoke the HTMLElement constructor but using the prototype from our HelloElement consutrctor.

For inheritance, you need to set the .prototype of the HelloElement constructor to an instance of HTMLElement and define methods and properties on that. It's conventional to use use Object.create() to create a non-functional dummy instance without invoking the constructor here.

You can use Object.defineProperty to define your static getter for observedAttributes, but it will usually just be a static list and you can simply set HelloElement.observedAttributes to an array of attribute names instead.

function HelloElement() {
   return Reflect.construct(HTMLElement, [], HelloElement);
}
HelloElement.prototype = Object.create(HTMLElement.prototype);

// Monitor the 'name' attribute for changes.
Object.defineProperty(HelloElement, 'observedAttributes', {
  get: function() { return ['name']; }
});
// or just use HelloElement.observedAttributes = ['name']
// if it doesn't need to be dynamic

// Respond to attribute changes.
HelloElement.prototype.attributeChangedCallback = function(attr, oldValue, newValue) {
  if (attr == 'name') {
    this.textContent = `Hello, ${newValue}`;
  }
}

customElements.define('hello-element', HelloElement);

setTimeout(function() {
  document.getElementById('example').setAttribute('name', "World");
}, 1000);
<hello-element id="example"></hello-element>

2
  • This is a great solution. While I would love to use it, I can't in an older browser since Reflect.construct is an ES6 operation and does not work in older browsers. But I still like it!!
    – Intervalia
    Sep 7, 2017 at 21:01
  • 1
    I was looking for this! :D I'll give it a try later and see if it works for my use case. I want to define a custom element from rust without going to JS land, I can't create a class from rust but I can use the usual web APIs :)
    – olanod
    Jun 14, 2019 at 7:31
2

There is no ES5 way of writing web component classes. Web components require ES6 features, there is no way around that. If you cannot use ES6 class syntax because your transpiler doesn't emit, you need to at least use ES6 Reflect.construct for creating custom elements with your own prototypes.

Alternatively, the custom elements polyfill appears to work with ES5 classes, at least in most browsers.

1
  • I wish this wasn't the case!
    – trusktr
    Mar 22, 2018 at 2:43
0

It just doesn't really work very effectively for ECMAScript 5 and lower with DOM nodes. You can add to the host prototypes if you wish, but you're not going to get an actual, clean subclass.

This is why object wrappers were sometimes used for DOM elements.

0

You can use Reflect method to do this, but this is an ES6 feature.

function CustomElement() {
    return Reflect.construct(HTMLElement, [], CustomElement);
}
Object.setPrototypeOf(CustomElement.prototype, HTMLElement.prototype);
Object.setPrototypeOf(CustomElement, HTMLElement);

customElements.define('custom-element', CustomElement);
var elem = document.createElement('custom-element');
document.body.appendChild(elem);

This will append <custom-element></custom-element> to the body.

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