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TL;DR I want to display a long-running strip chart with Plotly.js. I don't know how to discard old points.

Details

The following updater from my CodePen at https://codepen.io/Michael-F-Ellis/pen/QvXPQr does almost what I want. It shows a set of 20 samples in 2 traces that update continuously at 500 msec intervals. At the end of the demo, it plots all the points to show they still exist.

var cnt = 0;
var interval = setInterval(function() {
  // Add next point to each trace
  Plotly.extendTraces('graph', {
    y: [[rand()], [rand()]]
  }, [0, 1])
  // Display only 20 most recent points
  Plotly.relayout('graph', { 'xaxis.range': [cnt-20, cnt]})

  cnt = cnt+1;
  if(cnt === 100) {
    // Before ending the run, show all points
    // to demonstrate they still exist in Plotly.
    Plotly.relayout('graph', { 'xaxis.range': [0, cnt]});
    clearInterval(interval);
  }
}, 500);

The problem is that I do want to delete older points. The real application needs to run essentially forever on a system with limited memory. I'm looking for a Plotly call that will drop the oldest N trace points. It needs to be reasonably efficient as performance of the target system is also limited.

Thanks!

1 Answer 1

6

https://codepen.io/Michael-F-Ellis/pen/YxeEwm

The above seems workable from a behavioral standpoint. Here's the revised updating routine:

Plotly.plot('graph', data);
var cnt = 0;
var max = 20;
var interval = setInterval(function() {
  // Add next point to each trace
  Plotly.extendTraces('graph', {
    y: [[rand()], [rand()]]
  }, [0, 1])
  // Keep only 'max' most recent points
  if(cnt > max) {
    data[0].y.shift();
    data[1].y.shift();
  }
  cnt = cnt+1;
  if(cnt === 100) {
    // Before ending the run, show all points
    // to demonstrate that only 'max' points
    // still exist in Plotly.
    Plotly.relayout('graph', { 'xaxis.range': [0, cnt]});
    clearInterval(interval);
  }
}, 500);

The solution is to keep the data object in a var outside of Plotly and use shift() to drop old points from the beginning of the array as new points are added.

I'm open to another solution, especially if there are known memory or performance problems with this approach.

3
  • this is exactly what I'm looking for, thanks. Just wondering if you are still actively using it and if you've experienced any performance/memory issues? Mar 23, 2018 at 10:57
  • @JavierC.H. The code is stable when run under Chrome on a PC or OS X system. I'm still having problems with it on the the target system, chromium-browser on a Raspberry Pi 3 under Raspbian Jessie. After several hours, chromium ends up at 100% CPU.
    – Mike Ellis
    Mar 23, 2018 at 14:39
  • Great, hopefully that should be enough for my needs. Thank you! Mar 23, 2018 at 22:34

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