44

I'm doing some real quick and dirty benchmarking on a single line of C# code using DateTime:

long lStart = DateTime.Now.Ticks;
// do something
long lFinish = DateTime.Now.Ticks;

The problem is in the results:

Start Time [633679466564559902]
Finish Time [633679466564559902]

Start Time [633679466564569917]
Finish Time [633679466564569917]

Start Time [633679466564579932]
Finish Time [633679466564579932]

...and so on.

Given that the start and finish times are identical, Ticks is obviously not granular enough.

So, how can I better measure performance?

19 Answers 19

62

The Stopwatch class, available since .NET 2.0, is the best way to go for this. It is a very high performance counter accurate to fractions of a millisecond. Take a look at the MSDN documentation, which is pretty clear.

EDIT: As previously suggested, it is also advisable to run your code a number of times in order to get a reasonable average time.

11

Execute your code repeatedly. The problem seems to be that your code executes a lot faster than the granularity of your measuring instrument. The simplest solution to this is to execute your code many, many times (thousands, maybe millions) and then calculate the average execution time.

Edit: Also, due to the nature of current optimizing compilers (and Virtual Machines such as the CLR and the JVM) it can be very misleading to measure the execution speed of single lines of code, since the measurement can influence the speed quite a lot. A much better approach would be to profile the entire system (or at least larger blocks) and check where the bottlenecks are.

9

I find these useful

http://accelero.codeplex.com/SourceControl/changeset/view/22633#290971 http://accelero.codeplex.com/SourceControl/changeset/view/22633#290973 http://accelero.codeplex.com/SourceControl/changeset/view/22633#290972

TickTimer is a cut down copy of Stopwatch that starts when constructed and does not support restarting. It will also notify you if the current hardware does not support high resolution timing (Stopwatch swallows this problem)

So this

var tickTimer = new TickTimer();
//call a method that takes some time
DoStuff();
tickTimer.Stop();
Debug.WriteLine("Elapsed HighResElapsedTicks " + tickTimer.HighResElapsedTicks);
Debug.WriteLine("Elapsed DateTimeElapsedTicks " + tickTimer.DateTimeElapsedTicks);
Debug.WriteLine("Elapsed ElapsedMilliseconds " + tickTimer.ElapsedMilliseconds);
Debug.WriteLine("Start Time " + new DateTime(tickTimer.DateTimeUtcStartTicks).ToLocalTime().ToLongTimeString());

will output this

Elapsed HighResElapsedTicks 10022886
Elapsed DateTimeElapsedTicks 41896
Elapsed ElapsedMilliseconds 4.18966178849554
Start Time 11:44:58

DebugTimer is a wrapper for TickTimer that will write the result to Debug. (note: it supports the Disposable pattern)

So this

using (new DebugTimer("DoStuff"))
{
    //call a method that takes some time
    DoStuff();
}

will output this to the debug window

DoStuff: Total 3.6299 ms

IterationDebugTimer is for timing how long it takes to run an operation multiple times and write the result to Debug. It will also perform an initial run that is not included so as to ignore startup time. (note: it supports the Disposable pattern)

So this

int x;
using (var iterationDebugTimer = new IterationDebugTimer("Add", 100000))
{
    iterationDebugTimer.Run(() =>
    {
        x = 1+4;
    });
}

Will output this

Add: Iterations 100000 
Total 1.198540 ms 
Single 0.000012 ms
8

Just to add to what others have already said about using Stopwatch and measuring averages.

Make sure you call your method before measuring. Otherwise you will measure the time needed to JIT compile the code as well. That may skew your numbers significantly.

Also, make sure you measure release mode code as optimizations are turned off by default for debug builds. Tuning debug code is pointless imho.

And make sure you're measuring what you actually want to measure. When optimizations kick in, the compiler/JIT compiler may rearrange code or remove it entirely, so you may end up measuring something a little different than intended. At least take a look at the generated code to make sure code has not been stripped.

Depending on what you're trying to measure keep in mind, that a real system will stress the runtime differently than a typical test application. Some performance problems are related to e.g. how objects are garbage collected. These problems will typically not show up in a simple test application.

Actually, the best advise is to measure real systems with real data as sandbox tests may turn out to be highly inaccurate.

4

Use a real profiler such as dotTrace.

4

Sample for Stopwatch class

    using System.Diagnostics;
    ......
    ...
    ..
    Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
    sw.Start();
    //Your Code Here

    sw.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Elapsed={0}",sw.Elapsed);
4

You can use the Stopwatch, assuming you are using .NET 2.0 or newer.

System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.StartNew();

The Stopwatch class also has public read-only field IsHighResolution that will let you know if the stopwatch is based on a high-resolution performance counter. If its not, it is based on the system timer.

I'm not sure what it takes for stopwatch to be based on high-resolution performance counter. There are some API calls but I figure if the stopwatch doesn't use a high resolution, then the API is probably not there.

3

See the answer to Is DateTime.Now the best way to measure a function’s performance? for an explanation or read my blog post about high performance measurement

The problem is that DateTime has a resolution of about 15ms, it can't be more precise than that. Stopwatch, however, can.

3

Here's a nice write up at the MSDN on how to Implement a Continuously Updating, High-Resolution Time Provider for Windows

Here's the sample source code for the article (C++).

  • interesting read. thanks. – Scott Marlowe Jan 31 '09 at 15:30
  • That was a very useful link. – Kevin Gale Mar 26 '09 at 13:31
3

https://andreyakinshin.gitbooks.io/performancebookdotnet/content/science/microbenchmarking.html

https://github.com/PerfDotNet/BenchmarkDotNet

"Indeed, microbencmarking is very hard. If an operation takes 10–100ns, the operation measurement is a big challenge. I suggest you to use BenchmarkDotNet for your benchmarks. It’s a library that can help you to make an honest benchmark and get measurements with good precision. Of course, you can write own benchmark without any additional libraries. In this section, we talk about why it is probably a bad idea and what you should know before start."

1

This code project article shows how to use the high performance timer to measure execution speed of your code:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/highperformancetimercshar.aspx

Here you can find a number of open source C# profilers:

http://csharp-source.net/open-source/profilers

1

Another option is to have the timer-code inserted automatically with Fody. This makes your code far more easy to read as it seperates your cross-cutting concerns. I think this is close to what is called Aspect Oriented Programming, but done at post-compile time.

See https://github.com/Fody/MethodTimer for the fody addon that does method timing.

Quoting from the Readme:

With an interceptor, somewhere in your assembly:

public static class MethodTimeLogger {
  public static void Log(MethodBase methodBase, long milliseconds)
  {
    //Do some logging here
  } 
}

Your code,

public class MyClass
{
    [Time]
    public void MyMethod()
    {
        //Some code u are curious how long it takes
        Console.WriteLine("Hello");
    }
}

Is compiled to this:

public class MyClass
{
    public void MyMethod()
    {
        var stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        try
        {
            //Some code u are curious how long it takes
            Console.WriteLine("Hello");
        }
        finally
        {
            stopwatch.Stop();
            MethodTimeLogger.Log(methodof(MyClass.MyMethod), stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        }
    }
}
1

Disposable style Stopwatch works best to me.

class VWatch : IDisposable {
    Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
    public VWatch() {
        this.watch.Start();
    }
    public void Dispose() {
        this.watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Finished. Elapsed={0}", this.watch.Elapsed);
    }
}

And then:

using (new VWatch()) {
    /// do something for time measurement
}
1

My preferences go for BenchmarkDotNet mentioned by @Evgeniy. Probably his reply is bypassed because there is no code snippet, but as this is a complex item it worth at least taking a look into the library before to go head first into something bespoke.

And because some code always catches eyes, here is the example from the quoted site:

using System;
using System.Security.Cryptography;
using BenchmarkDotNet.Attributes;
using BenchmarkDotNet.Running;

namespace MyBenchmarks
{
    [ClrJob(baseline: true), CoreJob, MonoJob, CoreRtJob]
    [RPlotExporter, RankColumn]
    public class Md5VsSha256
    {
        private SHA256 sha256 = SHA256.Create();
        private MD5 md5 = MD5.Create();
        private byte[] data;

        [Params(1000, 10000)]
        public int N;

        [GlobalSetup]
        public void Setup()
        {
            data = new byte[N];
            new Random(42).NextBytes(data);
        }

        [Benchmark]
        public byte[] Sha256() => sha256.ComputeHash(data);

        [Benchmark]
        public byte[] Md5() => md5.ComputeHash(data);
    }

    public class Program
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var summary = BenchmarkRunner.Run<Md5VsSha256>();
        }
    }
}
0

Sometimes it may be best to look at why you need to time the operation? Is it running slow? Or are you just curious? First rule of optimization is "Don't do it". So, depending on what you're actually measuring, could change the opinion on what tool is best suited for the task.

  • This is not something that will go into production code, of course. Just something I need to benchmark before implementing the "real" code in production. – Scott Marlowe Jan 31 '09 at 15:30
0

Easiest to use a profiler like ANTS Performance Profiler, or one of the others which are available.

  • Disclaimer: I work for Red Gate – Ben Emmett Jul 27 '12 at 14:13
  • and small update: ANTS is not free, prices starts at $400. Stopwatch is free:P but I admit, ANTS is a great tool – quetzalcoatl Nov 24 '12 at 17:22
0

I made an extension that returns milliseconds from ticks.

public static int GetTotalRunningTimeInMilliseconds(this DateTime start)
{
    var endTicks = DateTime.Now.Ticks - start.Ticks;
    return TimeSpan.FromTicks(endTicks).Milliseconds;
}

Usage:

 var start = DateTime.Now;

 //...your long running code here

 var endTime = start.GetTotalRunningTimeInMilliseconds();
0

I've done a very simple method that measures the execution speed of an Action, which has for me the benefit that I can reuse it whenever I need it, and whichever code I have to measure.

For me a DateTime was enough, but it's easily adaptable from DateTime to Stopwatch.

public static TimeSpan MeasureTime(Action action)
{
    DateTime start = DateTime.Now;

    if (action == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("action");
    }

    try
    {
        action();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Debugger.Log(1, "Measuring",ex.ToString());
    }

    return DateTime.Now - start;
}

How to use it?:

private static void StressTest()
{
    List<TimeSpan> tss = new List<TimeSpan>();

    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        // here is the measuring:
        var ts = MeasureTime(() => instance.Method("param1"));

        tss.Add(ts);
    }

    Console.WriteLine("Max: {0}", tss.Max());
    Console.WriteLine("Min: {0}", tss.Min());
    Console.WriteLine("Avg: {0}", TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(tss.Average(i => i.TotalMilliseconds)));
}

or:

var ts = MeasureTime(() =>
                        {
                            // Some intensive stuff here
                            int a = 1;

                            // more here
                            int b = 2;

                            // and so on
                        });
-1

To measure performance with difference between measurements I use this class. The StopWatch class doesn't have the Split method.

/// <summary>
/// Stopwatch like class that keeps track of timelapses.
/// Probably low-res because of the usage of DateTime.
/// </summary>
public class ChronoMeter
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The name given when the Chronometer was constructed.
    /// </summary>
    public string Name { get; private set; }
    /// <summary>
    /// The moment in time Start was called.
    /// </summary>
    public DateTime Started { get; private set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// All time recordings are added to this list by calling Split and Stop.
    /// </summary>
    public List<ChronoRecord> Records { get; private set; }

    private readonly Stopwatch _stopWatch = new Stopwatch();

    private bool _hasBeenStopped = false;

    /// <summary>
    /// Constrcutor
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="pName">The name is used in logging</param>
    /// <param name="pLoggingType">The type of logging appriate for the information yielded by this time recording.</param>
    public ChronoMeter(string pName)
    {
        Name = pName;
        Records = new List<ChronoRecord>();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Not calling Stop is bad practise. Therefore a little safety net zo the end is still recorderd.
    /// Keep in mind that the garbase collector invokes the destructor, so the moment of time probably doesn't make much sense.
    /// It is more to notify that you should have used Stop for the latest split.
    /// </summary>
    ~ChronoMeter()
    {
        if (!_hasBeenStopped)
        {
            Stop("Destructor safety net");
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// TimeElapsedSinceStart of a ChronoRecord is relative to the moment ChronoMeter was started by calling this function.
    /// </summary>
    public void Start()
    {
        _stopWatch.Start();
        Started = DateTime.Now;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Splits the timerecording and add a record of this moment to the list of split records.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="pSplitName"></param>
    public void Split(string pSplitName)
    {
        _stopWatch.Stop();
        var created = Started + _stopWatch.Elapsed;
        var previousRecord = Records.LastOrDefault();
        Records.Add(new ChronoRecord(pSplitName, Started, created, previousRecord));
        _stopWatch.Start();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Indicates you are done and the records will be written to the log.
    /// </summary>
    public void Stop(string pSplitName)
    {
        Split(pSplitName);
        _stopWatch.Stop();
        _hasBeenStopped = true;
    }

    public class ChronoRecord
    {
        public string Name { get; private set; }
        public TimeSpan TimeElapsedSinceStart { get; private set; }
        public TimeSpan TimeElapsedSincePrevious { get; private set; }
        public DateTime Start { get; private set; }
        public DateTime Created { get; private set; }

        public ChronoRecord(string pName, DateTime pStartDateTime, DateTime pCreated, ChronoRecord pPreviousRecord=null)
        {
            if (pCreated == default(DateTime)) //Ignore DefaultDateTimeComparison
            {
                pCreated = DateTime.Now;
            }
            Created = pCreated;
            Name = pName;
            Start = pStartDateTime;

            TimeElapsedSinceStart = Created - Start;
            if (pPreviousRecord != null)
            {
                TimeElapsedSincePrevious = Created - pPreviousRecord.Created;
            }
            else
            {
                TimeElapsedSincePrevious = TimeElapsedSinceStart;
            }
        }
    }
}
  • 2
    Usage examples would have made assessing the utility of this class better. – nawfal Jun 29 '16 at 18:45

protected by Yuval Itzchakov Dec 7 '15 at 18:18

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.