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I am trying to write a program to solve a problem which states as follows "Print all possible distinct perfect squares whose sum is equal to the square of given number". For example -

Input

11

Output

1 4 16 36 64

1 4 16 100

4 36 81

I tried basic recursive approach and my code passed for small input. When I try for bigger number like 116 it runs forever. My JAVA code

public class SumOfPerfectSquare {
    public static void main(String args[]){
        generateSum(11);
    }

    private static void generateSum(int num) {
        int arr[] = new int[num];
        for(int i=1; i<num; i++){
            arr[i] = i*i;
        }
        findSum(arr, num*num, 1, 0, "");
    }

    private static void findSum(int arr[], int desiredSqr, int pointer, int currentSum, String sumStr) {
        if(pointer == arr.length || currentSum >= desiredSqr){
            if(currentSum == desiredSqr){
                System.out.println(sumStr);
            }
            return;
        }
        for(int i=pointer; i<arr.length; i++){
            findSum(arr, desiredSqr, i+1, currentSum+arr[i], sumStr+arr[i]+" ");
        }
    }
}

Please let me know if there is a better way to solve this (less time complexity)

  • 2
    What about 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1? – n.m. Aug 18 '17 at 20:04
  • Nopes need distinct perfect squares. I have edited the question to make it clear – Anakar Aug 18 '17 at 20:18
  • 1
    OK do you know how many solutions are there for 116? – n.m. Aug 18 '17 at 20:33
  • You need to make use of memoization. – Aadit M Shah Aug 18 '17 at 20:47
  • @AaditMShah How exactly does memoisation help here? Note all components of the sum must be distinct. – n.m. Aug 18 '17 at 20:56
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Memoization certainly helps reduce the time complexity of this problem:

const memoize = callback => {
    const memo = new Map;

    return function () {
        const length = arguments.length, last = length - 1;

        let map = memo;

        for (let i = 0; i < last; i++) {
            const argument = arguments[i];
            if (!map.has(argument)) map.set(argument, new Map);
            map = map.get(argument);
        }

        const argument = arguments[last];
        if (!map.has(argument)) map.set(argument, callback.apply(null, arguments));
        return map.get(argument);
    };
};

const generateSums = memoize((sum, xs, index) => {
    if (sum === 0) return [[]];

    const result = [], length = xs.length;

    for (let i = index; i < length; i++) {
        const x = xs[i], diff = sum - x;
        let j = i + 1; while (xs[j] > diff) j++;
        const xss = generateSums(diff, xs, j);
        for (const xs of xss) result.push([x].concat(xs));
    }

    return result;
});

const solve = n => {
    const xs = [];
    for (let x = n - 1; x > 0; x--) xs.push(x * x);
    return generateSums(n * n, xs, 0);
};

console.time("Generate sums for 50²");
console.log(solve(50).length);
console.timeEnd("Generate sums for 50²");

Without memoization it takes significantly longer (beware, it might crash your browser):

const generateSums = (sum, xs, index) => {
    if (sum === 0) return [[]];

    const result = [], length = xs.length;

    for (let i = index; i < length; i++) {
        const x = xs[i], diff = sum - x;
        let j = i + 1; while (xs[j] > diff) j++;
        const xss = generateSums(diff, xs, j);
        for (const xs of xss) result.push([x].concat(xs));
    }

    return result;
};

const solve = n => {
    const xs = [];
    for (let x = n - 1; x > 0; x--) xs.push(x * x);
    return generateSums(n * n, xs, 0);
};

console.time("Generate sums for 50²");
console.log(solve(50).length);
console.timeEnd("Generate sums for 50²");

It still takes too much time to solve for 116 squared but this is a start.

  • 1
    There are 67142554778 different ways to represent 116^2 as a sum of distinct squares. Good luck printing them all today. – n.m. Aug 19 '17 at 6:45
  • Hi @n.m how did you find the number of ways to represent 116^2 as sum of different squares? – Anakar Aug 24 '17 at 5:53
  • @Anakar Parida oeis is your friend oeis.org/A030273/b030273.txt – n.m. Aug 24 '17 at 6:09
  • @n.m its incredible. Thank you but is there any possibility to find it out via calculation. A sort of program that solves this mathematically – Anakar Aug 24 '17 at 6:11
  • 1
    The number of decompositions into distinct squares is easily computable. The sequence page oeis.org/A030273 has a Haskell and Mathematica programs – n.m. Aug 24 '17 at 6:17
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This can be done in O(n*sqrt(n)) by converting it into a subset sum problem. How?

consider all perfect squares which are less than or equal to N. The number of such elements would be sqrt(N).

Now are problem is in how many ways can we select a subset of these elements such that the sum = N.

Here is a discussion about this problem and you can find similar questions here.

The complexity of the problem if solved by Dynamic Programming would be O(n*sqrt(n))

Printing all these combinations would have O(sqrt(n)*2^(sqrt(n))) complexity, since their are 2^(sqrt(n)) subsets possible. We will have to check if this subset has sum = N.

Now if we traverse all numbers from 1 to 2^(srtn(N)-1). this number can represent all subsets which would be the indexes of the set bits it this number. traversing this number would take O(sqrt(N)) time.

So overall complexity O(sqrt(N) * 2^(sqrt(N))).

  • OP wants to print all the ways, not to count them. – n.m. Aug 19 '17 at 6:33
  • edited the answer – marvel308 Aug 19 '17 at 8:48

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