38

I'm looking for the best way to calculate execution time in go.

func main() {
    start := time.Now()

    time.Sleep(time.Second * 2)

    //something doing here

    elapsed := time.Since(start)
    fmt.Printf("page took %s", elapsed)
}

The code above works fine.

But when I use templates, I have to write it again for each template function.

Is there an efficient way of calculating execution time, including templates?

2
77

If you are timing an entire function, then you can use defer to eliminate some of the repetitive code.

func elapsed(what string) func() {
    start := time.Now()
    return func() {
        fmt.Printf("%s took %v\n", what, time.Since(start))
    }
}

func main() {
    defer elapsed("page")()  // <-- The trailing () is the deferred call
    time.Sleep(time.Second * 2)
}

playground example

3
  • 2
    Good trick. I feel that I need to focus more on "defer" statement. Aug 19 '17 at 1:08
  • 2
    Note: don't forget the extra () on the defer !
    – BrianT.
    Jun 3 '19 at 20:54
  • The deferred call's arguments are evaluated immediately, but the function call is not executed until the surrounding function returns. For example, defer outcall(incall()), the incall() is evaluated immediately, while the outcall() is not executed until the surrounding function returns.
    – axiqia
    Nov 28 '20 at 6:34
19

The solution provided by Cerise is perfect.


In addition, if you don't want to pass function name explicitly, you could accomplish it like this:

func SomeFunction(list *[]string) {
    defer TimeTrack(time.Now())
    // Do whatever you want.
}

func TimeTrack(start time.Time) {
    elapsed := time.Since(start)

    // Skip this function, and fetch the PC and file for its parent.
    pc, _, _, _ := runtime.Caller(1)

    // Retrieve a function object this functions parent.
    funcObj := runtime.FuncForPC(pc)

    // Regex to extract just the function name (and not the module path).
    runtimeFunc := regexp.MustCompile(`^.*\.(.*)$`)
    name := runtimeFunc.ReplaceAllString(funcObj.Name(), "$1")

    log.Println(fmt.Sprintf("%s took %s", name, elapsed))
}

As a result, you would get:

SomeFunction took 15.483µs


For more information, Refer this article: Go Function Tracing

Share the knowledge. :)

0
5

Use init function

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

var start time.Time

func init() {
    start = time.Now()
}

func getChars(s string) {
    for _, c := range s {
        fmt.Printf("%c at time %v\n", c, time.Since(start))
        time.Sleep(10 * time.Millisecond)
    }
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println("main execution started at time", time.Since(start))

    getChars("Hello")

    fmt.Println("\nmain execution stopped at time", time.Since(start))
}
2

Efficient way to calculate execution time in golang

You can easily get the execution time on your console using a defer function

defer functions execute even if the code get an error so you always get the execution time.

time package is used to get the time difference.

func main() {
    now := time.Now()
    defer func() {
        fmt.Println(time.Now().Sub(now))
    }()
        
    // Here you can do whatever you want
}

Or you can use this code

func main() {
        now := time.Now()
        defer func() {
            fmt.Println(time.Since(now))
        }()
            
        // Here you can do whatever you want
    }

check the code in Playground for more. I added some functionality to recover from an error at the same time print the execution time, even if in the case of a panic error.

8
  • Deferring after the fact (i.e. after your code you want to time) right before the end of the enclosing function is not really useful, as then you can just as well execute the second timing and printing directly without defer and have exactly the same functionality. defer exists to schedule some call before the code in question (to be executed thereafter) and to be called regardless of panics or early bail-outs occurring during the code in question. Oct 23 '18 at 14:55
  • based on the question defer is useful. It will work even if there is a panic. Oct 24 '18 at 7:22
  • I did not dispute that defer is useful for timing in general (the other answers show a good way to use it). Just the way it's used in this answer is not very productive. In particular placing defer at the end of the function makes no sense. Oct 24 '18 at 12:56
  • @blubberdiblub yeah but defer can placed in any position of the code you want. It will be added to defer stack and will execute whatever the position of the defer function. So I think it is more useful because we can code lazy... Oct 25 '18 at 4:44
  • 3
    This answer is no different from the accepted one, which was posted two years ago. What's the point? Dec 25 '18 at 19:29

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.