I've got data in SQL Server 2005 that contains html tags and I'd like to strip all that out, leaving just the text between the tags. Ideally also replacing things like &lt; with <, etc.

Is there an easy way to do this or has someone already got some sample t-sql code?

I don't have the ability to add extended stored procs and the like, so would prefer a pure t-sql approach (preferably one backwards compatible with sql 2000).

I just want to retrieve the data with stripped out html, not update it, so ideally it would be written as a user-defined function, to make for easy reuse.

So for example converting this:

<B>Some useful text</B>&nbsp;
<A onclick="return openInfo(this)"
   href="http://there.com/3ce984e88d0531bac5349"
   target=globalhelp>
   <IMG title="Source Description" height=15 alt="Source Description" 
        src="/ri/new_info.gif" width=15 align=top border=0>
</A>&gt;&nbsp;<b>more text</b></TD></TR>

to this:

Some useful text > more text
up vote 129 down vote accepted

There is a UDF that will do that described here:

User Defined Function to Strip HTML

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[udf_StripHTML] (@HTMLText VARCHAR(MAX))
RETURNS VARCHAR(MAX) AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @Start INT
    DECLARE @End INT
    DECLARE @Length INT
    SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<',@HTMLText)
    SET @End = CHARINDEX('>',@HTMLText,CHARINDEX('<',@HTMLText))
    SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1
    WHILE @Start > 0 AND @End > 0 AND @Length > 0
    BEGIN
        SET @HTMLText = STUFF(@HTMLText,@Start,@Length,'')
        SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<',@HTMLText)
        SET @End = CHARINDEX('>',@HTMLText,CHARINDEX('<',@HTMLText))
        SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1
    END
    RETURN LTRIM(RTRIM(@HTMLText))
END
GO

Edit: note this is for SQL Server 2005, but if you change the keyword MAX to something like 4000, it will work in SQL Server 2000 as well.

  • 9
    Great, thanks. Comments there link to an improved version: lazycoders.blogspot.com/2007/06/… which deals with more html entities. – Rory Jan 19 '09 at 14:40
  • 4
    Note that as a string-intensive UDF in SQL Server 2005 or later, this is a perfect candidate for implementing a CLR UDF function for a massive performance boost. More info on doing so here: stackoverflow.com/questions/34509/… – RedFilter Jan 19 '10 at 14:16
  • 9
    Note the lazycoders post has two typos. Remove the single quotes from around the CHAR(13) + CHAR(10) in two of the sections that have these. Subtle enough I didn't catch it until it exceeded the length of a short field (interestingly, and required for me, all replacements are shorter than the original string). – goodeye Aug 30 '11 at 1:26
  • 1
    What about html encoded values? would need them decoded. Thanks. – JDPeckham Aug 18 '12 at 22:53
  • 2
    I used the lazycoders, plus the typo fix from @goodeye above - works great. To save time, the lazycoders blog version is here: lazycoders.blogspot.com/2007/06/… – condiosluzverde Jan 28 '14 at 20:28

If your HTML is well formed, I think this is a better solution:

create function dbo.StripHTML( @text varchar(max) ) returns varchar(max) as
begin
    declare @textXML xml
    declare @result varchar(max)
    set @textXML = REPLACE( @text, '&', '' );
    with doc(contents) as
    (
        select chunks.chunk.query('.') from @textXML.nodes('/') as chunks(chunk)
    )
    select @result = contents.value('.', 'varchar(max)') from doc
    return @result
end
go

select dbo.StripHTML('This <i>is</i> an <b>html</b> test')
  • 1
    This worked for me. +1. But could you please explain your code, so that developers understand it more easily? :) – Saeed Neamati Jan 23 '12 at 6:28
  • it looks like it loads the html as an xml document then selects all of the values out of it. Note: this code pukes on &nbsp; – JDPeckham Aug 18 '12 at 22:52
  • 2
    Put a hack in for not bombing on HTML codes. Obviously just a quick hack for in-house use or whatever (just as with accepted UDF). – dudeNumber4 Jan 16 '13 at 22:55
  • It does have to be well formed, so it's not as fault tolerant as RedFilter's. – Micah B. Sep 30 '14 at 15:57
  • 1
    HTML is not a subset of XML. XHTML is, but HTML is not headed down that road any more. – David Aug 27 '15 at 16:23

Derived from @Goner Doug answer, with a few things updated:
- using REPLACE where possible
- conversion of predefined entities like &eacute; (I chose the ones I needed :-)
- some conversion of list tags <ul> and <li>

ALTER FUNCTION [dbo].[udf_StripHTML]
--by Patrick Honorez --- www.idevlop.com
--inspired by http://stackoverflow.com/questions/457701/best-way-to-strip-html-tags-from-a-string-in-sql-server/39253602#39253602
(
@HTMLText varchar(MAX)
)
RETURNS varchar(MAX)
AS
BEGIN
DECLARE @Start  int
DECLARE @End    int
DECLARE @Length int

set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '<br>',CHAR(13) + CHAR(10))
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '<br/>',CHAR(13) + CHAR(10))
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '<br />',CHAR(13) + CHAR(10))
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '<li>','- ')
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '</li>',CHAR(13) + CHAR(10))

set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&rsquo;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, ''''  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&quot;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '"'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&amp;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '&'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&euro;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '€'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&lt;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '<'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&gt;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '>'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&oelig;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'oe'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&nbsp;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, ' '  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&copy;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '©'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&laquo;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '«'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&reg;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '®'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&plusmn;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '±'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&sup2;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '²'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&sup3;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '³'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&micro;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'µ'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&middot;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '·'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&ordm;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'º'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&raquo;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '»'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&frac14;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '¼'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&frac12;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '½'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&frac34;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '¾'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&Aelig' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'Æ'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&Ccedil;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'Ç'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&Egrave;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'È'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&Eacute;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'É'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&Ecirc;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'Ê'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&Ouml;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'Ö'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&agrave;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'à'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&acirc;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'â'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&auml;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'ä'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&aelig;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'æ'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&ccedil;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'ç'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&egrave;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'è'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&eacute;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'é'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&ecirc;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'ê'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&euml;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'ë'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&icirc;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'î'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&ocirc;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'ô'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&ouml;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'ö'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&divide;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '÷'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&oslash;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'ø'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&ugrave;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'ù'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&uacute;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'ú'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&ucirc;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'û'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&uuml;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, 'ü'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&quot;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '"'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&amp;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '&'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&lsaquo;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '<'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)
set @HTMLText = replace(@htmlText, '&rsaquo;' collate Latin1_General_CS_AS, '>'  collate Latin1_General_CS_AS)


-- Remove anything between <STYLE> tags
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<STYLE', @HTMLText)
SET @End = CHARINDEX('</STYLE>', @HTMLText, CHARINDEX('<', @HTMLText)) + 7
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1

WHILE (@Start > 0 AND @End > 0 AND @Length > 0) BEGIN
SET @HTMLText = STUFF(@HTMLText, @Start, @Length, '')
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<STYLE', @HTMLText)
SET @End = CHARINDEX('</STYLE>', @HTMLText, CHARINDEX('</STYLE>', @HTMLText)) + 7
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1
END

-- Remove anything between <whatever> tags
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<', @HTMLText)
SET @End = CHARINDEX('>', @HTMLText, CHARINDEX('<', @HTMLText))
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1

WHILE (@Start > 0 AND @End > 0 AND @Length > 0) BEGIN
SET @HTMLText = STUFF(@HTMLText, @Start, @Length, '')
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<', @HTMLText)
SET @End = CHARINDEX('>', @HTMLText, CHARINDEX('<', @HTMLText))
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1
END

RETURN LTRIM(RTRIM(@HTMLText))

END
  • 1
    I've used this and love it, but I did add one more replace to the top group: </p> I changed to a char 13 + char 10 also since the end of a paragraph tag would typically indicate a new line. It worked perfectly in my particular scenario – D.R. Jun 6 at 14:36

This is not a complete new solution but a correction for afwebservant's solution:

--note comments to see the corrections

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[StripHTML] (@HTMLText VARCHAR(MAX))  
RETURNS VARCHAR(MAX)  
AS  
BEGIN  
 DECLARE @Start  INT  
 DECLARE @End    INT  
 DECLARE @Length INT  
 --DECLARE @TempStr varchar(255) (this is not used)  

 SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<',@HTMLText)  
 SET @End = CHARINDEX('>',@HTMLText,CHARINDEX('<',@HTMLText))  
 SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1  

 WHILE @Start > 0 AND @End > 0 AND @Length > 0  
 BEGIN  
   IF (UPPER(SUBSTRING(@HTMLText, @Start, 4)) <> '<BR>') AND (UPPER(SUBSTRING(@HTMLText, @Start, 5)) <> '</BR>')  
    begin  
      SET @HTMLText = STUFF(@HTMLText,@Start,@Length,'')  
      end  
-- this ELSE and SET is important
   ELSE  
      SET @Length = 0;  

-- minus @Length here below is important
   SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<',@HTMLText, @End-@Length)  
   SET @End = CHARINDEX('>',@HTMLText,CHARINDEX('<',@HTMLText, @Start))  
-- instead of -1 it should be +1
   SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1  
 END  

 RETURN RTRIM(LTRIM(@HTMLText))  
END  
  • This worked for me after I used nvarchar instead of varchar because I use unicode characters inside html tags – Shadi Namrouti Jul 18 '16 at 20:30

Here's an updated version of this function that incorporates the RedFilter answer (Pinal's original) with the LazyCoders additions and the goodeye typo corrections AND my own addition to handle in-line <STYLE> tags inside the HTML.

ALTER FUNCTION [dbo].[udf_StripHTML]
(
@HTMLText varchar(MAX)
)
RETURNS varchar(MAX)
AS
BEGIN
DECLARE @Start  int
DECLARE @End    int
DECLARE @Length int

-- Replace the HTML entity &amp; with the '&' character (this needs to be done first, as
-- '&' might be double encoded as '&amp;amp;')
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('&amp;', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 4
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1

WHILE (@Start > 0 AND @End > 0 AND @Length > 0) BEGIN
SET @HTMLText = STUFF(@HTMLText, @Start, @Length, '&')
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('&amp;', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 4
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1
END

-- Replace the HTML entity &lt; with the '<' character
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('&lt;', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 3
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1

WHILE (@Start > 0 AND @End > 0 AND @Length > 0) BEGIN
SET @HTMLText = STUFF(@HTMLText, @Start, @Length, '<')
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('&lt;', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 3
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1
END

-- Replace the HTML entity &gt; with the '>' character
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('&gt;', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 3
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1

WHILE (@Start > 0 AND @End > 0 AND @Length > 0) BEGIN
SET @HTMLText = STUFF(@HTMLText, @Start, @Length, '>')
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('&gt;', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 3
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1
END

-- Replace the HTML entity &amp; with the '&' character
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('&amp;amp;', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 4
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1

WHILE (@Start > 0 AND @End > 0 AND @Length > 0) BEGIN
SET @HTMLText = STUFF(@HTMLText, @Start, @Length, '&')
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('&amp;amp;', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 4
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1
END

-- Replace the HTML entity &nbsp; with the ' ' character
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('&nbsp;', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 5
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1

WHILE (@Start > 0 AND @End > 0 AND @Length > 0) BEGIN
SET @HTMLText = STUFF(@HTMLText, @Start, @Length, ' ')
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('&nbsp;', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 5
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1
END

-- Replace any <br> tags with a newline
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<br>', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 3
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1

WHILE (@Start > 0 AND @End > 0 AND @Length > 0) BEGIN
SET @HTMLText = STUFF(@HTMLText, @Start, @Length, CHAR(13) + CHAR(10))
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<br>', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 3
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1
END

-- Replace any <br/> tags with a newline
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<br/>', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 4
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1

WHILE (@Start > 0 AND @End > 0 AND @Length > 0) BEGIN
SET @HTMLText = STUFF(@HTMLText, @Start, @Length, CHAR(13) + CHAR(10))
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<br/>', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 4
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1
END

-- Replace any <br /> tags with a newline
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<br />', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 5
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1

WHILE (@Start > 0 AND @End > 0 AND @Length > 0) BEGIN
SET @HTMLText = STUFF(@HTMLText, @Start, @Length, CHAR(13) + CHAR(10))
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<br />', @HTMLText)
SET @End = @Start + 5
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1
END

-- Remove anything between <STYLE> tags
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<STYLE', @HTMLText)
SET @End = CHARINDEX('</STYLE>', @HTMLText, CHARINDEX('<', @HTMLText)) + 7
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1

WHILE (@Start > 0 AND @End > 0 AND @Length > 0) BEGIN
SET @HTMLText = STUFF(@HTMLText, @Start, @Length, '')
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<STYLE', @HTMLText)
SET @End = CHARINDEX('</STYLE>', @HTMLText, CHARINDEX('</STYLE>', @HTMLText)) + 7
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1
END

-- Remove anything between <whatever> tags
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<', @HTMLText)
SET @End = CHARINDEX('>', @HTMLText, CHARINDEX('<', @HTMLText))
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1

WHILE (@Start > 0 AND @End > 0 AND @Length > 0) BEGIN
SET @HTMLText = STUFF(@HTMLText, @Start, @Length, '')
SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<', @HTMLText)
SET @End = CHARINDEX('>', @HTMLText, CHARINDEX('<', @HTMLText))
SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1
END

RETURN LTRIM(RTRIM(@HTMLText))

END
  • This is a gem ;-) Thx. And since it's easy to read I should be able to incorporate accented characters (predefined character entities) handling – Patrick Honorez Sep 16 '16 at 9:14
  • 1
    For my information, any reason using STUFF() instead of REPLACE() (which woudl be mush shorter IMO) ? – Patrick Honorez Sep 16 '16 at 10:02
  • I hadn't really thought about it. I simply copied/modified the original, as indicated. Replace might very-well be a better option. I wonder if there's a performance comparison between the two functions to consider... – Goner Doug Sep 17 '16 at 22:32

Try this. It's a modified version of the one posted by RedFilter ... this SQL removes all tags except BR, B, and P with any accompanying attributes:

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[StripHtml] (@HTMLText VARCHAR(MAX))
RETURNS VARCHAR(MAX)
AS
BEGIN
 DECLARE @Start  INT
 DECLARE @End    INT
 DECLARE @Length INT
 DECLARE @TempStr varchar(255)

 SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<',@HTMLText)
 SET @End = CHARINDEX('>',@HTMLText,CHARINDEX('<',@HTMLText))
 SET @Length = (@End - @Start) + 1

 WHILE @Start > 0 AND @End > 0 AND @Length > 0
 BEGIN
   IF (UPPER(SUBSTRING(@HTMLText, @Start, 3)) <> '<BR') AND (UPPER(SUBSTRING(@HTMLText, @Start, 2)) <> '<P') AND (UPPER(SUBSTRING(@HTMLText, @Start, 2)) <> '<B') AND (UPPER(SUBSTRING(@HTMLText, @Start, 3)) <> '</B')
   BEGIN
      SET @HTMLText = STUFF(@HTMLText,@Start,@Length,'')
   END

   SET @Start = CHARINDEX('<',@HTMLText, @End)
   SET @End = CHARINDEX('>',@HTMLText,CHARINDEX('<',@HTMLText, @Start))
   SET @Length = (@End - @Start) - 1
 END

 RETURN RTRIM(LTRIM(@HTMLText))
END
  • didn't work for me SELECT dbo.StripHtml('<b>somestuff</b>'); returns that exact string – ladieu Mar 1 '13 at 19:03
  • @ladieu, this is expected. Check very first line of the answer ("this SQL removes all tags except BR, B, and P with any accompanying attributes"). – Peter Herdenborg Apr 24 '13 at 11:15
  • this SQL function is incorrect. Please refer to the answer below for the corrected function. – futureelite7 Jun 15 '15 at 7:25
  • @futureelite7 using "below" and "above" as a reference for where to find answers on an SO page is nonsensical, because the answer order can be changed using the tabs at the top (and further more, voting can change answer order). Please specify an answer using the name of the author posting it – Caius Jard May 23 at 10:22

How about using XQuery with a one liner:

select @xml.query('for $x in //. return ($x)//text()')

This loops through all elements and returns the text() only.

To avoid text between elements concatenating without spaces, use:

SELECT @xml.query('for $x in //. return concat((($x)//text())[1]," ")')

These are excellent for when you want to build seach phrases, strip HTML, etc.

Just note that this returns type xml, so CAST or COVERT to text where appropriate. The xml version of this data type is useless, as it is not a well formed XML.

  • Without the actual solution to cast from xml I feel like this is at best a partial solution. – Dennis Jaheruddin Feb 6 at 11:12
  • CAST(@xml as varchar(max)). Or CONVERT(xml), @XML). Assumed most developers would figure that out. – Arvin Amir Feb 7 at 19:11
  • It is definitely reasonable to assume that developers know how to cast, but keep in mind that someone reading your answer may not directly see that 'simply' casting is all that needs to be done. Especially because it is mentioned that we can cast where appropriate. -- I am not trying to be negative, just hope this helps you in creation of answers that are more easy to recognize as being usefull! – Dennis Jaheruddin Feb 8 at 8:49

protected by Kermit May 26 '14 at 3:33

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