71

After upgrading to ASP.NET Core 2.0, I can't seem to create migrations anymore.

I'm getting

"An error occurred while calling method 'BuildWebHost' on class 'Program'. Continuing without the application service provider. Error: One or more errors occurred. (Cannot open database "..." requested by the login. The login failed. Login failed for user '...'"

and

"Unable to create an object of type 'MyContext'. Add an implementation of 'IDesignTimeDbContextFactory' to the project, or see https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=851728 for additional patterns supported at design time."

The command I previously ran was $ dotnet ef migrations add InitialCreate --startup-project "..\Web" (from the project/folder with the DBContext).

Connection string: "Server=(localdb)\\mssqllocaldb;Database=database;Trusted_Connection=True;MultipleActiveResultSets=true"

This is my Program.cs

 public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        BuildWebHost(args).Run();
    }

    public static IWebHost BuildWebHost(string[] args) =>
       WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
           .UseStartup<Startup>()
           .Build();
}
  • 3
    Possibly the problem is not in Program.cs. It is probably the use of an instruction to load seed data at the end of your Configure method: DbInitializer.Initialize (context); If you have that instruction, comment it: //DbInitializer.Initialize(context); Then run the Migration instructions to test. If the problem arises, then follow up on the DbInitializer.cs class. – Miguel Torres C Aug 20 '17 at 20:17
  • 1
    Is your MyContext class in another class library project? – Orhun Aug 22 '17 at 6:37
  • Same issue here, context is in other library. If id add an parameter less consturctor to the context, migrations are working, but with the same error: (An error occurred while calling method 'BuildWebHost' on class 'Program'. Continuing without the application service provider. Error: Object reference not set to an instance of an object. ) – iBoonZ Aug 26 '17 at 11:40
  • Did you get it resolved in the end? – Konrad Viltersten Sep 8 '17 at 11:19
  • @MiguelTorresC thanks for that comment. I commented out my Seeding Methods and Migrations began to work again. Thanks a ton !!! – Amit Philips Jul 12 '18 at 2:20

24 Answers 24

86

You can add a class that implements IDesignTimeDbContextFactory inside of your Web project.

Here is the sample code:

public class DesignTimeDbContextFactory : IDesignTimeDbContextFactory<CodingBlastDbContext>
{
    public CodingBlastDbContext CreateDbContext(string[] args)
    {
        IConfigurationRoot configuration = new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .SetBasePath(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory())
            .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json")
            .Build();
        var builder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<CodingBlastDbContext>();
        var connectionString = configuration.GetConnectionString("DefaultConnection");
        builder.UseSqlServer(connectionString);
        return new CodingBlastDbContext(builder.Options);
    }
}

Then, navigate to your Database project and run the following from command line:

dotnet ef migrations add InitialMigration -s ../Web/

dotnet ef database update -s ../Web/

-s stands for startup project and ../Web/ is the location of my web/startup project.

resource

  • 2
    I'm getting: The configuration file 'appsettings.json' was not found and is not optional. The physical path is 'C:\Users\XXX\Documents\Visual Studio 2017\Projects\XXX\src\XXX.Api\bin\Debug\netcoreapp2.0\appsettings.json'. My appsettings is in C:\Users\XXX\Documents\Visual Studio 2017\Projects\XXX\src\XXX.Api. – Reft Sep 1 '17 at 19:37
  • Make sure you have the appsettings.json file set to copy local should fix the issue with it not being found – DaImTo Dec 8 '17 at 11:54
  • 1
    This solution introduces a dependency on Entity Framework into your host application (in my case this is a Web project). Is there any way to get around this? I would like my Repository library to hold the EF stuff, and not introduce EF into the web app. – Banoona Dec 17 '18 at 10:29
  • Despite this is the accepted answer, this one is better: stackoverflow.com/a/52671330/1737395 Indeed, running the migration with --verbose flag helps greatly – barbara.post Mar 19 at 9:36
39

No need for IDesignTimeDbContextFactory.

Run

add-migration initial -verbose

that will reveal the details under

An error occurred while accessing the IWebHost on class 'Program'. Continuing without the application service provider.

warning, which is the root cause of the problem.

In my case, problem was, having ApplicationRole : IdentityRole<int> and invoking services.AddIdentity<ApplicationUser, IdentityRole>() which was causing below error

System.ArgumentException: GenericArguments[1], 'Microsoft.AspNetCore.Identity.IdentityRole', 
on 'Microsoft.AspNetCore.Identity.EntityFrameworkCore.UserStore`9[TUser,TRole,TContext,
TKey,TUserClaim,TUserRole,TUserLogin,TUserToken,TRoleClaim]' violates the constraint of type 'TRole'.
---> System.TypeLoadException: GenericArguments[1], 'Microsoft.AspNetCore.Identity.IdentityRole', 
on 'Microsoft.AspNetCore.Identity.UserStoreBase`8[TUser,TRole,TKey,TUserClaim,
TUserRole,TUserLogin,TUserToken,TRoleClaim]' violates the constraint of type parameter 'TRole'.
  • This is weird, the command add-migration initial threw the error no dbcontext found but when I ran add-migration initial -verbose it worked perfectly. I didn't make any code changes just changed the command. Any idea why? – Train Oct 14 '18 at 2:34
  • @OrthoHomeDefense well, that's really weird. I expect -verbose to expose the underlying error details. Not really sure why it fixed an error. – tchelidze Oct 14 '18 at 9:28
  • 3
    Yes -Verbose helps to actually uncover the real problem. In my case haven't added AddDbContext services to startup. – suds Dec 24 '18 at 12:54
  • Hmm for me add-migration initial worked. How come it worked while using dotnet ef migrations add initial did not? – Jon Koivula Feb 4 at 17:08
  • 3
    @tchelidze Thank you for that, in my case I didn't have a parameterless constructor in my ApplicationDbContext. – Tiago Ávila Apr 9 at 11:15
8

In my case, the cause of the problem was multiple startup projects. I have three projects in my solution: Mvc, Api, and Dal. DbContext and Migrations in the Dal project.

I had configured multiple startup projects. Both Mvc and Api projects were running when I clicked Start. But in this case I was getting this error.

"Unable to create an object of type 'MyContext'. Add an implementation of 'IDesignTimeDbContextFactory' to the project, or see https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=851728 for additional patterns supported at design time."

I could successfully add migration after setting Mvc as the only startup project and selecting Dal in the Package Manager Console.

  • 1
    Thank you, kind of same thing happened to me. I had to change startup project to the place where Startup/Program classes exists. The error message is a bad joke. – Ľuboš Čurgó May 20 at 11:08
  • 1
    Output messages were really frustrating. I had no startup project selected, unexpectedly. This was the reason why dbContext could not be created. Thanks. – upkit May 31 at 15:19
  • Thank you, this works for me. !!! – Guilherme Golfetto Jun 24 at 13:59
6

A better solution :

If your startup project is an ASP.NET Core app, the tools try to obtain the DbContext object from the application's service provider.

The tool first try to obtain the service provider by invoking Program.BuildWebHost() and accessing the IWebHost.Services property.

add this method after Main Method in Program.cs

public static IWebHost BuildWebHost(string[] args) =>
    WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
        .UseStartup<Startup>()
        .Build();

Update .net core 2.2

public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        CreateWebHostBuilder(args).Build().Run();
    }

    public static IWebHostBuilder CreateWebHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
        WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
            .UseStartup<Startup>();
} 

Other possible solution:

Make sure you added Dbcontext to dependency injection: AddDbContext<TContext> will make both your DbContext type, TContext, and the corresponding DbContextOptions<TContext> available for injection from the service container. This requires adding a constructor argument to your DbContext type that accepts DbContextOptions<TContext>.

Example: In Startup.cs

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddDbContext<AppDbContext>(options => options.UseSqlServer(connectionString));
}

AppDbContext code:

public class AppDbContext: DbContext
{
    public AppDbContext(DbContextOptions<BloggingContext> options)
      :base(options)
    { }

}
  • 1
    This worked for me. Changed the BuildWebHost function in Program.cs from public static IWebHostBuilder BuildWebHost(string[] args) to public static IWebHost BuildWebHost(string[] args) with the .Build() now included in the function – zola25 Mar 18 at 12:21
  • 1
    Guys, if you are using ASP.NET Core 2.1+ you BuildWebHost method will have a different name - CreateWebHostBuilder because of docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/migration/… so rename CreateWebHostBuilder to BuildWebHost and migration will find BuildWebHost and take DbContext from it. – KEMBL May 8 at 12:36
  • 1
    Thanks mate, Solved after spend 2 hours to configure without using IDesignTimeDbContextFactory – Azri Zakaria Jun 15 at 20:31
5

In the AppContext.cs besides AppContext class add another class:

// required when local database deleted
public class ToDoContextFactory : IDesignTimeDbContextFactory<AppContext>
{
    public AppContext CreateDbContext(string[] args)
    {
        var builder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<AppContext>();
          builder.UseSqlServer("Server=localhost;Database=DbName;Trusted_Connection=True;MultipleActiveResultSets=true");
        return new AppContext(builder.Options);
    }
}

This will solve your second problem:

"Unable to create an object of type 'MyContext'. Add an implementation of 'IDesignTimeDbContextFactory' to the project,

After that you will be able to add-migration Initial and execute it by running update-database command. However if running these commands when there is no DataBase yet in your local SqlServer you will get the warning like your first error: "An error

occurred while calling method 'BuildWebHost' on class 'Program'... The login failed. Login failed for user '...'"

But it is not error because migration will be created and it can be executed. So just ignore this error for the first time, and latter since Db will exist it won't happen again.

4

please verify that you have the reference

<PackageReference Include="Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Design" Version="2.0.0" />
  • 5
    I'm using <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.AspNetCore.All" Version="2.0.0" /> which includes that reference. I tried also including the above, but no change. – ruhm Aug 20 '17 at 16:19
4

Something that really helped me was this article: https://elanderson.net/2017/09/unable-to-create-an-object-of-type-applicationdbcontext-add-an-implementation-of-idesigntimedbcontextfactory/

The basic idea is that in the change over from .net core 1 to 2 all db initialization should be moved out of the StartUp.cs and into the Program.cs. Otherwise the EF tasks try and run your DB inits when doing tasks.

"There is a nice section in the official migration docs (https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/miscellaneous/1x-2x-upgrade) titled “Move database initialization code” which I seemed to have missed. So before you head down any rabbit holes like I did make sure this isn’t what is causing your need to add an implementation of IdesignTimeDbContextFactory."

  • Thanks, this helped me too. – Sergey Nov 13 '17 at 17:50
4
public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        BuildWebHost(args).Run();
    }

    public static IWebHost BuildWebHost(string[] args) =>
        WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
            .UseStartup<Startup>()
            .Build();
    }
}

Just rename BuildWebHost() to CreateWebHostBuilder(), because migrations use this method by default.

  • WHAT. This should be advertised on every page dealing with this issue are you serious. Instant success. Thank you. – Chaim Eliyah May 11 at 10:11
3

You can try this solution from this discussion, which was inspired by this post.

public static IWebHost MigrateDatabase(this IWebHost webHost)
{
    using (var scope = webHost.Services.CreateScope())
    {
        var services = scope.ServiceProvider;

        try
        {
            var db = services.GetRequiredService<MyContext>();
            db.Database.Migrate();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            var logger = services.GetRequiredService<ILogger<Program>>();
            logger.LogError(ex, "An error occurred while migrating the database.");
        }
    }

    return webHost;
}
public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    BuildWebHost(args)
        .MigrateDatabase()
        .Run();
}
  • 2
    I'm still getting: Add an implementation of 'IDesignTimeDbContextFactory<DatabaseContext>'...... – Reft Sep 1 '17 at 19:50
3

I had this problem and this solved By Set -> Web Application(Included Program.cs) Project to -> "Set as Startup Project"

Then run -> add-migration initial -verbose

in Package Manager Console

Set as Startup Project

  • Thank you, the only solution that worked for me was to set the web project as startup project and that is exactly what needed to be done. – user3012760 May 8 at 14:27
2

Previously, you configured the seed data in the Configure method in Startup.cs. It is now recommended that you use the Configure method only to set up the request pipeline. Application startup code belongs in the Main method.

The refactored Main method. Add the following references to the Program.cs:

using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;

using MyProject.MyDbContextFolder;

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var host = BuildWebHost(args);

    using (var scope = host.Services.CreateScope())
    {
        var services = scope.ServiceProvider;
        try
        {
            var context = services.GetRequiredService<MyDbConext>();
            DbInitializer.Initialize(context);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            var logger = services.GetRequiredService<ILogger<Program>>();
            logger.LogError(ex, "An error occurred while seeding the database.");
        }
    }

    host.Run();
}

2

There's a problem with ef seeding db from Startup.Configure in 2.0 ... you can still do it with this work around. Tested and worked fine

https://garywoodfine.com/how-to-seed-your-ef-core-database/

2

In my case I got the problem because I had a method named SeedData.EnsurePopulated() being called on my Startup.cs file.

public class Startup
{
    public Startup(IConfiguration configuration) => Configuration = configuration;
    public IConfiguration Configuration { get; }

    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        //
    }

    public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env)
    {
        app.UseDeveloperExceptionPage();
        app.UseStatusCodePages();
        app.UseStaticFiles();
        app.UseSession();
        app.UseMvc(routes =>
        {
            //
        });

        SeedData.EnsurePopulated(app);
    }
}

The work of SeedData class is to add initial data to the database table. It's code is:

public static void EnsurePopulated(IApplicationBuilder app)
    {
        ApplicationDbContext context = app.ApplicationServices.GetRequiredService<ApplicationDbContext>();
        context.Database.Migrate();
        if (!context.Products.Any())
        {
            context.Products.AddRange(
            new Product
            {
                Name = "Kayak",
                Description = "A boat for one person",
                Category = "Watersports",
                Price = 275
            },
            ....
            );
            context.SaveChanges();
        }
    }

SOLUTION

Before doing migration simply comment out the calling of SeedData class in the Startup.cs file.

// SeedData.EnsurePopulated(app);

That solved my problem and hope your problem is also solved in the same way.

2

From

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/miscellaneous/cli/dbcontext-creation

When you create a new ASP.NET Core 2.0 application, this hook is included by default. In previous versions of EF Core and ASP.NET Core, the tools try to invoke Startup.ConfigureServices directly in order to obtain the application's service provider, but this pattern no longer works correctly in ASP.NET Core 2.0 applications. If you are upgrading an ASP.NET Core 1.x application to 2.0, you can modify your Program class to follow the new pattern.

Add Factory in .Net Core 2.x

public class BloggingContextFactory : IDesignTimeDbContextFactory<BloggingContext>
    {
        public BloggingContext CreateDbContext(string[] args)
        {
            var optionsBuilder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<BloggingContext>();
            optionsBuilder.UseSqlite("Data Source=blog.db");

            return new BloggingContext(optionsBuilder.Options);
        }
    }
2

If you want to avoid those IDesignTimeDbContextFactory thing: Just make sure that you don't use any Seed method in your startup. I was using a static seed method in my startup and it was causing this error for me.

1

I ran into same problem. I have two projects in the solution. which

  1. API
  2. Services and repo, which hold context models

Initially, API project was set as Startup project.

I changed the Startup project to the one which holds context classes. if you are using Visual Studio you can set a project as Startup project by:

open solution explorer >> right-click on context project >> select Set as Startup project

0

I got the same issue since I was referring old- Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Tools.DotNet

<DotNetCliToolReference Include="Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Tools.DotNet" Version="1.0.0" />

After upgrading to the newer version it got resolved

0

In main project's appsettings.json file, I had set 'Copy to Output directory' to "Copy always" and it worked.

0

Sample DB context class for .net core console applications

using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore;
using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Design;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration;
using System.IO;

namespace EmailServerConsole.Data
{
    public class EmailDBContext : DbContext
    {
        public EmailDBContext(DbContextOptions<EmailDBContext> options) : base(options) { }
        public DbSet<EmailQueue> EmailsQueue { get; set; }
    }

    public class ApplicationContextDbFactory : IDesignTimeDbContextFactory<EmailDBContext>
    {
        EmailDBContext IDesignTimeDbContextFactory<EmailDBContext>.CreateDbContext(string[] args)
        {
            IConfigurationRoot configuration = new ConfigurationBuilder()
                .SetBasePath(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory())
                .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json")
                .Build();
            var builder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<EmailDBContext>();
            var connectionString = configuration.GetConnectionString("connection_string");
            builder.UseSqlServer(connectionString);
            return new EmailDBContext(builder.Options);
        }
    }
}
  • While this might answer the authors question, it lacks some explaining words and links to documentation. Raw code snippets are not very helpful without some phrases around it. You may also find how to write a good answer very helpful. Please edit your answer. – hellow Sep 13 '18 at 6:08
0

You also can use in the startup class constructor to add json file (where the connection string lies) to the configuration. Example:

    IConfigurationRoot _config;
    public Startup(IHostingEnvironment env)
    {
        var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .SetBasePath(env.ContentRootPath)
            .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json");

        _config = builder.Build();
    }
0

For me it was because I changed the Output Type of my startup project from Console Application to Class Library.

Reverting to Console Application did the trick.

0

I had this issue in a solution that has:

  • a .NET Core 2.2 MVC project
  • a .NET Core 3.0 Blazor project
  • The DB Context in a .NET Standard 2.0 class library project

I get the "unable to create an object..." message when the Blazor project is set as the start up project, but not if the MVC project is set as the startup project.

That puzzles me, because in the Package Manager Console (which is where I'm creating the migration) I have the Default project set to a the C# class library that actually contains the DB Context, and I'm also specifying the DB context in my call to add-migration add-migration MigrationName -context ContextName, so it seems strange that Visual Studio cares what startup project is currently set.

I'm guessing the reason is that when the Blazor project is the startup project the PMC is determining the version of .NET to be Core 3.0 from the startup project and then trying to use that to run the migrations on the .NET Standard 2.0 class library and hitting a conflict of some sort.

Whatever the cause, changing the startup project to the MVC project that targets Core 2.2, rather than the Blazor project, fixed the issue

-1

In my case this error occurred due to I remove MyDbContext from ConfigureServices because of some Design Patterns. Check that. In Startup.cs => ConfigureServices add these lines:

var connectionString = "Application Connection String!!!";
services.AddDbContext<MyDbContext>(c => c.UseSqlServer(connectionString));
-2

I had same problem. Just changed the ap.jason to application.jason and it fixed the issue

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