354

Please advise how to pass parameters into a function called using setInterval.

My example setInterval(funca(10,3), 500); is incorrect.

1
  • 4
    Syntax: .setInterval(func, delay[, param1, param2, ...]);
    – O-9
    Apr 9 '19 at 7:43

18 Answers 18

598

You need to create an anonymous function so the actual function isn't executed right away.

setInterval( function() { funca(10,3); }, 500 );
5
  • 4
    what should be for dynamic parameter?
    – rony36
    Aug 22 '13 at 17:16
  • 29
    @rony36 - you probably want to have a function that creates the interval timer for you. Pass in the parameter to the function so its value is captured in the function closure and retained for when the timer expires. function createInterval(f,dynamicParameter,interval) { setInterval(function() { f(dynamicParameter); }, interval); } Then call it as createInterval(funca,dynamicValue,500); Obviously you can extend this for more than one parameter. And, please, use more descriptive variable names. :)
    – tvanfosson
    Aug 22 '13 at 18:12
  • @tvanfosson: awesome answer! Do you know how to clear the interval form within function funca?
    – Adam
    Nov 2 '16 at 22:35
  • @tvanfosson Thanks. My bad, but I actually meant the createInterval example you gave in the comment section. How would it work for that? I was thinking of passing a timer variable as a dynamic parameter too, but not sure how or if that makes sense. In the interest of clarity I added a new question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/40414792/…
    – Adam
    Nov 4 '16 at 3:26
  • This worked for me but why is this the case? Nov 5 '21 at 8:21
89

Add them as parameters to setInterval:

setInterval(funca, 500, 10, 3);

The syntax in your question uses eval, which is not recommended practice.

4
  • 3
    Whaa?! Since when was that allowed? (serious question) Jan 19 '09 at 15:03
  • 2
    Not sure. My source was: developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/window.setInterval
    – Kev
    Jan 19 '09 at 18:18
  • 2
    @Kev Internet Explorer is a real mess It does not supports passing arguments -.- Jan 28 '12 at 11:38
  • 2
    IMHO this should be the accepted answer. Nice, simple and clean solution.
    – LightMan
    Dec 18 '18 at 11:45
88

now with ES5, bind method Function prototype :

setInterval(funca.bind(null,10,3),500);

Reference here

5
  • 3
    This is the best answer, however it might have unexpected behaviour depending on the function. e.g. console.log.bind(null)("Log me") will throw Illegal invocation, but console.log.bind(console)("Log me") will work as expected. This is because console.log requires console as the this arg.
    – Indy
    Feb 16 '14 at 7:53
  • 1
    By far the best answer. Lean and clean. Thanks a lot!
    – Tobi
    Sep 2 '14 at 10:01
  • Very clean and efficient! Dec 2 '14 at 18:55
  • 2
    Just add that works with Chrome>=7, Firefox>=4.0, Explorer>=9, Opera>=11.60, Safari>=5.1 (Source: developer.mozilla.org/ca/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…) Jun 15 '16 at 11:41
  • The MDN link provided by @RogerVeciana is broken now, so here's the updated one - developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…
    – yoniLavi
    Mar 19 '21 at 12:14
36
     setInterval(function(a,b,c){

          console.log(a + b +c);  

      }, 500, 1,2,3);

           //note the console will  print 6
          //here we are passing 1,2,3 for a,b,c arguments
         // tested in node v 8.11 and chrome 69
3
  • 3
    Best explained answer.
    – Drk_alien
    Aug 30 '16 at 2:26
  • So why pass the arguments as arrays? This detail doesn’t even relate to the question. Feb 24 '18 at 1:49
  • This is what I was looking for, this should be on top Jun 28 '20 at 20:22
33

You can pass the parameter(s) as a property of the function object, not as a parameter:

var f = this.someFunction;  //use 'this' if called from class
f.parameter1 = obj;
f.parameter2 = this;
f.parameter3 = whatever;
setInterval(f, 1000);

Then in your function someFunction, you will have access to the parameters. This is particularly useful inside classes where the scope goes to the global space automatically and you lose references to the class that called setInterval to begin with. With this approach, "parameter2" in "someFunction", in the example above, will have the right scope.

2
  • 1
    You can access by Classname.prototype.someFunction.parameter1
    – JoaquinG
    Oct 15 '12 at 10:07
  • 3
    Adding parameters to an object or function can cause the compiler to slow down since it will have to rebuild it's native code representation of the object (for instance if this was done in a hot loop) so be careful. Feb 20 '14 at 18:50
21
setInterval(function,milliseconds,param1,param2,...)

Update: 2018 - use the "spread" operator

function repeater(param1, param2, param3){
   alert(param1);
   alert(param2);
   alert(param3); 
}

let input = [1,2,3];
setInterval(repeater,3000,...input);

1
  • This is way better. Dec 21 '19 at 15:47
18

You can use an anonymous function;

setInterval(function() { funca(10,3); },500);
2
  • 1
    this is quite an expensive call!
    – Roy Lee
    Feb 4 '14 at 9:27
  • 3
    @Roylee How is it expensive? Feb 24 '18 at 1:48
13

By far the most practical answer is the one given by tvanfosson, all i can do is give you an updated version with ES6:

setInterval( ()=>{ funca(10,3); }, 500);
1
  • 1
    Are you saying that ()=>{} is ES6's new way to replace function(){}? Interesting. First, I thought rockets were passe. And, unless this syntax has other common uses, it's just very, very odd. I see they are "fat arrows". Still, odd. I guess someone likes it and it's a matter of opinion.
    – Richard_G
    Nov 20 '16 at 20:20
7

Quoting the arguments should be enough:

OK --> reloadIntervalID = window.setInterval( "reloadSeries('"+param2Pass+"')" , 5000)

KO --> reloadIntervalID = window.setInterval( "reloadSeries( "+param2Pass+" )" , 5000)

Note the single quote ' for each argument.

Tested with IE8, Chrome and FireFox

1
  • 7
    Using eval is a terrible practice. The use of anonymous function is way better.
    – SuperIRis
    Jul 23 '13 at 20:33
3
const designated = "1 jan 2021"

function countdown(designated_time){

    const currentTime = new Date();
    const future_time = new Date(designated_time);
    console.log(future_time - currentTime);
}

countdown(designated);

setInterval(countdown, 1000, designated);

There are so many ways you can do this, me personally things this is clean and sweet.

2

The best solution to this answer is the next block of code:

setInterval(() => yourFunction(param1, param2), 1000);
1

I know this topic is so old but here is my solution about passing parameters in setInterval function.

Html:

var fiveMinutes = 60 * 2;
var display = document.querySelector('#timer');
startTimer(fiveMinutes, display);

JavaScript:

function startTimer(duration, display) {
    var timer = duration,
        minutes, seconds;

    setInterval(function () {
        minutes = parseInt(timer / 60, 10);
        seconds = parseInt(timer % 60, 10);

        minutes = minutes < 10 ? "0" + minutes : minutes;
        seconds = seconds < 10 ? "0" + seconds : seconds;

        display.textContent = minutes + ":" + seconds;
        --timer; // put boolean value for minus values.

    }, 1000);
}
1
  • i need to access a value once when calling the function, but not each second, so your answer provides this, (eg timer), but how do you clearInterval() in this scenario? Sep 29 '18 at 8:55
0

This works setInterval("foo(bar)",int,lang);.... Jon Kleiser lead me to the answer.

0

Another solution consists in pass your function like that (if you've got dynamics vars) : setInterval('funca('+x+','+y+')',500);

0

You can use a library called underscore js. It gives a nice wrapper on the bind method and is a much cleaner syntax as well. Letting you execute the function in the specified scope.

http://underscorejs.org/#bind

_.bind(function, scope, *arguments)

0

That problem would be a nice demonstration for use of closures. The idea is that a function uses a variable of outer scope. Here is an example...

setInterval(makeClosure("Snowden"), 1000)

function makeClosure(name) {
var ret

ret = function(){
    console.log("Hello, " + name);
}

return ret;
}

Function "makeClosure" returns another function, which has access to outer scope variable "name". So, basically, you need pass in whatever variables to "makeClosure" function and use them in function assigned to "ret" variable. Affectingly, setInterval will execute function assigned to "ret".

0

I have had the same problem with Vue app. In my case this solution is only works if anonymous function has declared as arrow function, regarding declaration at mounted () life circle hook.

0

Also, with IE Support > 9, you can pass more variables insider set interval that will be taken by you function. E.g:

function myFunc(arg1, arg2){};
setInterval(myFunc, 500, arg1, arg2);

Greetings!

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