0

I'm new to arrow functions and I don't understand why I can use this code:

const adder = {
    sum: 0,
    add(numbers) {
        numbers.forEach(n => {
            this.sum += n;
        });
    }
};

adder.add([1,2,3]);
// adder.sum === 6

... and it works just fine, but in the following case the this is not bound properly:

const adder = {
    sum: 0,
    add: (numbers) => {
        numbers.forEach(n => {
            this.sum += n;
        });
    }
};

adder.add([1,2,3]);
// Cannot read property sum
2
  • Write console.log(this) in both cases and see. – Orkhan Alikhanov Aug 20 '17 at 17:55
  • I don't understand why is this marked as duplicate. It's not about arrow functions in general, but about two nested arrow functions. – Dávid Molnár Aug 21 '17 at 7:44
3

From MDN:

An arrow function expression has a shorter syntax than a function expression and does not bind its own this, arguments, super, or new.target.(...)

Meaning that inside an arrow function the this refers to the outter most this there is. If you run that in the browser, the this is the window object.

use adder.sum instead of this.sum.

Fiddle

2
  • Sorry, but I don't understand. So, in the first case this.sum refers to adder.sum and the second case window.sum? Why is there a difference between the two? You say it's the outer most this, but that means the two cases should be identical. – Dávid Molnár Aug 21 '17 at 7:47
  • They are. An arrow function does not bind to any this. So when you access this.adder you are accessing the first this that is in context, probably the window object. – pedromss Aug 21 '17 at 7:59
1

Arrow function allows to reach lexical this. Which is a context where adder is defined, not adder itself.

It is expected to work like that:

function Foo () {
    // this === foo;
    this.sum = 0;

    const adder = {
        sum: 0,
        add: (numbers) => {
            numbers.forEach(n => {
                // this === foo;
                this.sum += n;
            });
        }
    };

    adder.add([1,2,3]);
}

const foo = new Foo;

And

const adder = {
    sum: 0,
    add(numbers) { ... }
};

is a shortcut for

const adder = {
    sum: 0,
    add: function (numbers) { ... }
};

so add method will have adder as this when it's called like adder.add(...).

5
  • Of course, here adder.add is never called and not available to the outside either. – Bergi Aug 20 '17 at 17:54
  • Thanks, I fixed it for clarity. – Estus Flask Aug 20 '17 at 17:56
  • Sorry, I don't understand. How come, that in the first case this.sum refers to adder.sum or is that a false assumption? – Dávid Molnár Aug 21 '17 at 7:50
  • @DávidMolnár In the first case add is regular function, which gets dynamic this, depending on how it's called. When it's called like adder.add(...), it gets adder as this because this is the object method were called on. This is how regular functions differ from arrows (explained in dupe questions). – Estus Flask Aug 21 '17 at 8:24
  • Thanks for the comparison examples, most useful! – MarsAndBack Jan 1 '20 at 0:34

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