2

I have a text file, tab separated, as follows:

< this is a header

col1 col2 col3
blablabla text1.txt blablabla
blablabla text2.txt blablabla
blablabla text3.txt blablabla

I want to be able to extract certain elements (columns), in this case only the words text1.txt, text2.txt and text3.txt. I want to use them later to open the files with those names. So far I have the code:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @fields;
my ($column1, $column2, $column3);

my $text = "text.txt";

open(FILE, $text) or die "Could not read from $text, program halting.";

my @files;

while(<FILE>)
{
  chomp;
   /^</ and next;
   /^\s*$/ and next;
   /line*/ and next;

  ($column1, $column2, $column3) = split('\s', $_);

#PRINT ONE
#print $column2, "\t";


}
#PRINT TWO
print $column2, "\t";

close FILE;

If I do the print as commented with #PRINT ONE, I get the correct version as an output only,with all three elements but when I try to save it in another variable or write it to file, only "text3.txt" remains. If I do the print as in #PRINT TWO, I only get one element, the same text3.txt. How do I learn from this? I have tried lots of codes from this site but no result so far.Thank you.

  • Every time through the loop you get new numbers for columns, for that line, overwriting the ones for the previous line (in $columnN variables). Save them: push @col2, $column2; (instead of commented out print); declare the array before the loop. The value you print after the loop is just for the very last number. – zdim Aug 20 '17 at 20:37
  • Thank you very much. It worked. – Megiddo Aug 20 '17 at 20:42
2

This is happening because you overwrite $column2 on every pass of the loop, then after you leave the loop, you have the very last result (text3.txt).

You can write to a file within the loop, which this example shows. It also shows how to use the proper 3-arg open, with lexical file handles:

use warnings;
use strict;

my $input_file = 'data.txt';
my $output_file = 'out.txt';

open my $fh, '<', $input_file or die $!;
open my $wfh, '>', $output_file or die $!;

while (<$fh>){
    chomp;
    next if /^\</;
    next if /^\s*$/;

    my ($c1, $c2, $c3) = split /\s/, $_;

    print $wfh "$c2\n";
}

Given this as the input file:

< this is a header

col1 col2 col3
blablabla text1.txt blablabla
blablabla text2.txt blablabla
blablabla text3.txt blablabla

Produces:

col2
text1.txt
text2.txt
text3.txt

...in the output file. You'll have to sort out how to filter the first line.

You can also save the output to an array within the loop, then work on it later:

use warnings;
use strict;

my $input_file = 'data.txt';

open my $fh, '<', $input_file or die $!;

my @saved_entries;

while (<$fh>){
    chomp;
    next if /^\</;
    next if /^\s*$/;
    push @saved_entries, (split /\s/, $_)[1];
}

for (@saved_entries){
    print "$_\n";
}

...which you can then write to a file or do what you need to with.

Note that I'm being overly verbose here, as to be as close to OP code as possible.

  • Thanks guys, it is solved now, but why the first print- the one inside the loop gave me this output: "text1.txt text2.txt text3.txt" ? No overwrite here? – Megiddo Aug 20 '17 at 20:57
  • @Megiddo because inside the loop, you're printing before the next iteration overwrites it. – stevieb Aug 20 '17 at 21:08
  • Should it not be first text1.txt, and with the second iteration to change to text2.txt and finaly in the end, the final version text3.txt? Sorry to be such a noob but It really puzzles me. – Megiddo Aug 20 '17 at 21:11
  • Yes, that's how it happens when you print inside of the loop, exactly as you said. However, after the loop, because you've declared $column2 as a global variable, when you loop over the file, you continuously re-populate that specific variable, and after the loop, the variable will contain the value it received successfully on the last iteration of the loop (text3.txt). That is, $column2 variable is overwritten on each loop, and after it ends, it holds the value of that iteration. Since the last iteration sets $column2 to text3.txt, that's what falls out as the value after the loop – stevieb Aug 20 '17 at 21:14
  • 1
    Consider: (1) The split /\s/ is practically equivalent to split ' ' (except that ' ' also trims spaces) and ' ' is also default. So it's enough to say split; here, in both uses (2) Add a comment on using split with its default (or use it in code with an explanation), in particular since chomp and regex use defaults (3) Add a comment in code that identifies a header; the statement underneath can be overlooked -- even though the OP is aware of this with their (wrong) /line*/. – zdim Aug 20 '17 at 22:44

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