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I have some data stored in plain text files. It uses spaces to seperate the different columns but in different tables the columns have a different width (different number of characters). The content of the table data includes words, integers, floats and ranges.

Is the a simple way to extract the data in javascript and transpile it into an html table? I would prefer a kind of general approach that can be used for all tables (means it had to detect the position of a new column by itself - fixed indexes are impossible because as previously mentioned they differ from file to file).

Here is an example how one of these plain text tables look like:

Line1    23     45.4     12 - 14
Line2    4      5.9      < 8
Line3    13.56  105.34   20.37 - 130.20
Line4    7.2    14.2     10.1 - 14.0
...
  • What delimits the columns, Spaces, Tabs etc? Is there a min/max number of spaces after a column? Is there a simple way? I doubt it, you have irregularly formatted arbitrary data. The hack solution is to throw it all in a <pre> tag to go with the plain text presentation. – Jon P Aug 21 '17 at 7:29
  • The columns are all separated by spaces. So to speak I need a method to find the indexes of words / numbers / ranges within a line of text so I can split the lines by these indexes afterwards. – Mountain Aug 21 '17 at 7:37
  • Columns appear to use spaces from a mono-spaced font to align text presentation into columns. They are not separated by spaces - otherwise "< 8" goes into two columns. How much do text files vary in their number of columns, and can you form rules to identity what makes up a column even if its content contains spaces? – traktor53 Aug 21 '17 at 7:57
  • The files contain 2 up to 10 columns. Each of them contains a single word, a single integer or float, a range of integers / floats (eg '12.34 - 5.67') or a group of 2 or 3 word seperated by a single space. Seems to be quite difficult to solve, I know... – Mountain Aug 21 '17 at 8:34
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I think this guy here has the right solution for you.

He's splitting up his lines on the basis of spaces.

So once you get your data in an array, you can simply loop through the arrays and append string with html tags to form a html table. You can refer to the displayHtml() method in peeto's answer.

Let me know you need further help with it.

EDIT **

So, as per your sample data you provided, I'm assuming two or more spaces to change to a new column. If this is the way you can try my code below.

var data = `23     45.4     12 - 14
4      5.9      < 8
13.56  105.34   20.37 - 130.20
7.2    14.2     10.1 - 14.0`;

data = data.split(/\r?\n/); // split text into lines

var lines = [];
for (var i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
  data[i] = data[i].trim();
  lines.push(data[i].split(/[ ][ ]+/)); // split lines further based on 2 or more spaces
}
// creating html string
var htmlStr = '<table id=\'myTable\'>';
for (var i = 0; i < lines.length; i++) {
  htmlStr += '<tr>';
  for (var j = 0; j < lines[i].length; j++) {
    htmlStr += '<td>' + lines[i][j] + '</td>';
  }
  htmlStr += '</tr>';
}
htmlStr += '</table>';

document.getElementById('myDiv').innerHTML = htmlStr; // append string wherever you like

I hope this helps you. But if it still doesn't, you really need to have a close look on all your files and find at least one similarity between them about the pattern being followed to change the column.

  • Link only answers are not really answers, this should either be a comment or expanded to fit the question here. – Jon P Aug 21 '17 at 22:32
  • @Jon P I've updated my answer – Shahbaz Aug 22 '17 at 6:02
  • This comes close to what I was looking for. I think it will work in my case with a few modifications. Thanks a lot. – Mountain Aug 22 '17 at 16:46
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This works for your data:

function readTextFile(file)
{
    var rawFile = new XMLHttpRequest();
    var allText = '';
    rawFile.open('GET', file, false);
    rawFile.onreadystatechange = function ()
    {
        if(rawFile.readyState === 4)
        {
            if(rawFile.status === 200 || rawFile.status == 0)
            {
                allText = rawFile.responseText;
            }
        }
    }
    rawFile.send(null);
    return allText;
}

function returnColumns(file)
{
    var allText = readTextFile(file);
    var lines = allText.split('\n');
    var data = [];
    for(var i = 0; i < lines.length; i++)
    {
        if (lines[i] != '')
        {
            data[i] = [lines[i].slice(0, 9), lines[i].slice(10, 16), lines[i].slice(17, 25), lines[i].slice(26) ];
        }
    }
    return data;
}

function displayHtml()
{
    var data = returnColumns('data.txt');
    var html = '<table border="3">';
    for (var r = 0; r < data.length; r++)
    {
        html += '<tr>';
        for (var c = 0; c < data[r].length; c++)
        {
            html += '<td>' + data[r][c] + '</td>';
        }
        html += '</tr>';
    }
    html += '</table>';
    document.getElementById('content').innerHTML = html;
}
  • This doesn't answer how to programmatically determine the position of columns from file content. – traktor53 Aug 21 '17 at 7:59
  • No, of course not, the columns are at fixed positions so I just looked at the data. I did test the code of course. – peeto Aug 21 '17 at 8:01
  • Not sure why I got downvoted. If it was CSV the answer can be determined from my code, ie: var columns = row.split('\t'); If they aren't in fixed positions or in CSV then there is no real solution. – peeto Aug 21 '17 at 8:03
  • TBH honest I did notice I actually got the indexes wrong but hopefully @Mountain can deal with that – peeto Aug 21 '17 at 9:28
  • To quote the question itself "fixed indexes are impossible because as previously mentioned they differ from file to file", that is probably the reason for your down vote. – Jon P Aug 21 '17 at 22:31

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