5

I have a very large dataframe which has 100 years of dates as column headers (i.e. ~36500 columns) and 100 years of dates as indices (ie ~36500 rows). I have a function which calculates a value for each of the elements of the dataframe which will need to be run 36500^2 times.

Ok, the problem is not the function which is quite fast, but rather assignment of values to the dataframe. It takes about 1 sec per 6 assignments even if I assign a constant this way. Obviously I'm pretty thick as you can tell:

for i, row in df_mBase.iterrows():
    for idx, val in enumerate(row):
        df_mBase.ix[i][idx] = 1
    print(i)

Ordinarily in C/Java i would simply loop through a 36500x36500 double loop and access the preassigned memory directly via indexing which can be achieved in constant time with virtually no overhead. But this appears to be not an option in python?

What would be the fastest way to store this data in a dataframe? Pythonian or not, I'm after speed only - I dont care for elegance.

2
  • From where are you getting the data? CSV? Commented Aug 21, 2017 at 10:54
  • What do you want? A data frame with all 1s?
    – cs95
    Commented Aug 21, 2017 at 10:57

2 Answers 2

6

there are a few reasons why this might slow

.ix

.ix is a magic type indexer, which can do both label and positional indexing, but will be deprecated for the stricter .loc for label-based and .iloc for index-based. I assume .ix does a lot of magic behind the scenes to figure out whether label or location-based indexing is needed

.iterrows

returns a (new?) Series for each row. Column-based iteration might be faster, as .iteritems to iterate over the columns

[][]

df_mBase.ix[i][idx] returns a Series, and then takes element idx from it, which gets assigned the value 1.

df_mBase.loc[i, idx] = 1

should improve this

benchmarking

import pandas as pd

import itertools
import timeit


def generate_dummy_data(years=1):
    period = pd.Timedelta(365 * years, unit='D')

    start = pd.Timestamp('19000101')
    offset = pd.Timedelta(10, unit='h')

    dates1 = pd.DatetimeIndex(start=start, end=start + period, freq='d')
    dates2 = pd.DatetimeIndex(start=start + offset, end=start + offset + period, freq='d')

    return pd.DataFrame(index=dates1, columns=dates2, dtype=float)


def assign_original(df_orig):
    df_new = df_orig.copy(deep=True)
    for i, row in df_new.iterrows():
        for idx, val in enumerate(row):
            df_new.ix[i][idx] = 1
    return df_new


def assign_other(df_orig):
    df_new = df_orig.copy(deep=True)
    for (i, idx_i), (j, idx_j) in itertools.product(enumerate(df_new.index), enumerate(df_new.columns)):
        df_new[idx_j][idx_i] = 1
    return df_new


def assign_loc(df_orig):
    df_new = df_orig.copy(deep=True)
    for i, row in df_new.iterrows():
        for idx, val in enumerate(row):
            df_new.loc[i][idx] = 1
    return df_new


def assign_loc_product(df_orig):
    df_new = df_orig.copy(deep=True)
    for i, j in itertools.product(df_new.index, df_new.columns):
        df_new.loc[i, j] = 1
    return df_new


def assign_iloc_product(df_orig):
    df_new = df_orig.copy(deep=True)
    for (i, idx_i), (j, idx_j) in itertools.product(enumerate(df_new.index), enumerate(df_new.columns)):
        df_new.iloc[i, j] = 1
    return df_new


def assign_iloc_product_range(df_orig):
    df_new = df_orig.copy(deep=True)
    for i, j in itertools.product(range(len(df_new.index)), range(len(df_new.columns))):
        df_new.iloc[i, j] = 1
    return df_new


def assign_index(df_orig):
    df_new = df_orig.copy(deep=True)
    for (i, idx_i), (j, idx_j) in itertools.product(enumerate(df_new.index), enumerate(df_new.columns)):
        df_new[idx_j][idx_i] = 1
    return df_new


def assign_column(df_orig):
    df_new = df_orig.copy(deep=True)
    for c, column in df_new.iteritems():
        for idx, val in enumerate(column):
            df_new[c][idx] = 1
    return df_new


def assign_column2(df_orig):
    df_new = df_orig.copy(deep=True)
    for c, column in df_new.iteritems():
        for idx, val in enumerate(column):
            column[idx] = 1
    return df_new


def assign_itertuples(df_orig):
    df_new = df_orig.copy(deep=True)
    for i, row in enumerate(df_new.itertuples()):
        for idx, val in enumerate(row[1:]):
            df_new.iloc[i, idx] = 1
    return df_new


def assign_applymap(df_orig):
    df_new = df_orig.copy(deep=True)
    df_new = df_new.applymap(lambda x: 1)
    return df_new


def assign_vectorized(df_orig):
    df_new = df_orig.copy(deep=True)
    for i in df_new:
        df_new[i] = 1
    return df_new


methods = [
    ('assign_original', assign_original),
    ('assign_loc', assign_loc),
    ('assign_loc_product', assign_loc_product),
    ('assign_iloc_product', assign_iloc_product),
    ('assign_iloc_product_range', assign_iloc_product_range),
    ('assign_index', assign_index),
    ('assign_column', assign_column),
    ('assign_column2', assign_column2),
    ('assign_itertuples', assign_itertuples),
    ('assign_vectorized', assign_vectorized),
    ('assign_applymap', assign_applymap),
]


def get_timings(period=1, methods=()):
    print('=' * 10)
    print(f'generating timings for a period of {period} years')
    df_orig = generate_dummy_data(period)
    df_orig.info(verbose=False)
    repeats = 1
    for method_name, method in methods:
        result = pd.DataFrame()

        def my_method():
            """
            This looks a bit icky, but is the best way I found to make sure the values are really changed,
            and not just on a copy of a DataFrame
            """
            nonlocal result
            result = method(df_orig)

        t = timeit.Timer(my_method).timeit(number=repeats)

        assert result.iloc[3, 3] == 1

        print(f'{method_name} took {t / repeats} seconds')
        yield (method_name, {'time': t, 'memory': result.memory_usage(deep=True).sum()/1024})


periods = [0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1, 3]


results = {period: dict(get_timings(period, methods)) for period in periods}

print(results)

timings_dict = {period: {k: v['time'] for k, v in result.items()} for period, result in results.items()}

df = pd.DataFrame.from_dict(timings_dict)
df.transpose().plot(logy=True).figure.savefig('test.png')
                              0.03        0.1         0.3         1.0         3.0
assign_applymap               0.001989    0.009862    0.018018    0.105569    0.549511
assign_vectorized             0.002974    0.008428    0.035994    0.162565    3.810138
assign_index                  0.013717    0.137134    1.288852    14.190128   111.102662
assign_column2                0.026260    0.186588    1.664345    19.204453   143.103077
assign_column                 0.016811    0.212158    1.838733    21.053627   153.827845
assign_itertuples             0.025130    0.249886    2.125968    24.639593   185.975111
assign_iloc_product_range     0.026982    0.247069    2.199019    23.902244   186.548500
assign_iloc_product           0.021225    0.233454    2.437183    25.143673   218.849143
assign_loc_product            0.018743    0.290104    2.515379    32.778794   258.244436
assign_loc                    0.029050    0.349551    2.822797    32.087433   294.052933
assign_original               0.034315    0.337207    2.714154    30.361072   332.327008

Conclusion

timing plot

If you can use vectorization, do so. Depending on the calculation, you can use another method. If yo only need the value that is used, the applymap seems fastest. If you need the index and-or column too, work with the columns

If you can't vectorize, df[column][index] = x works fastest, with iterating over the columns with df.iteritems() as a close second

2
  • Replacing the original code with the last line of the suggested code actually makes the code run twice slower for some reason.
    – afora377
    Commented Aug 22, 2017 at 0:30
  • I found your result quite intriguing, so I ran some benchmarks Commented Aug 22, 2017 at 14:38
4

You should create the data structure either in native python or in numpy and pass the data to a the DataFrame constructor. If your function can be written using numpy's function/operation, then you can use the vectorized nature of numpy to avoid looping over all indices.

Here is an example with a made up function:

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import datetime as dt
import dateutil as du

dates = [dt.date(2017, 1, 1) - du.relativedelta.relativedelta(days=i) for i in range(36500)]
data = np.zeros((36500,36500), dtype=np.uint8)

def my_func(i, j):
    return (sum(divmod(i,j)) - sum(divmod(j,i))) % 255

for i in range(1, 36500):
    for j in range(1, 36500):
        data[i,j] = my_func(i,j)

df = pd.DataFrame(data, columns=dates, index=dates)

df.head(5)
#returns:

            2017-08-21  2017-08-20  2017-08-19  2017-08-18  2017-08-17  \
2017-08-21           0           0           0           0           0
2017-08-20           0           0         254         253         252
2017-08-19           0           1           0           0           0
2017-08-18           0           2           0           0           1
2017-08-17           0           3           0         254           0

               ...      1917-09-19  1917-09-18  1917-09-17  1917-09-16
2017-08-21     ...               0           0           0           0
2017-08-20     ...             225         224         223         222
2017-08-19     ...             114         113         113         112
2017-08-18     ...              77          76          77          76
2017-08-17     ...              60          59          58          57
1
  • This works as a magic. Are there any other tricks to expedite this? Lower level code etc? Tu!
    – afora377
    Commented Aug 22, 2017 at 0:40

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