82

In Kotlin, I can run code if an object is not null like this:

data?.let {
    // execute this block if not null
}

But how can I execute a block of code if the object is null?

9 Answers 9

188

You can use the elvis operator and evaluate another block of code with run { ... }:

data?.let {
    // execute this block if not null
} ?: run {
    // execute this block if null
}

But this seems not to be quite as readable as a simple if-else statement.

Also, you might find this Q&A useful:

4
  • 53
    Be careful, if let {} returns null, both blocks would run! Apr 24, 2019 at 6:54
  • 6
    apply {} would be safer.
    – Tenfour04
    Sep 26, 2019 at 16:27
  • 1
    @SillyFreak yes it is, i have a logic problem because of this
    – Vlad
    Oct 15, 2019 at 6:40
  • 1
    This has the danger that if by mistake the let {} block returns null the run {} block will be executed. Oct 18, 2023 at 5:51
53

Here's a concise syntax using the Elvis operator. Recall the Elvis operator only executes the right side if the left side evaluates to null.

data ?: doSomething()
3
  • The best example of KISS Nov 24, 2021 at 5:53
  • This is really cool.
    – Dan Ortega
    Jul 12, 2022 at 15:01
  • 1
    Kotlin does not seem to like doSomething) to be a block, like data ?: { doSomething(); return 0 } - it writes to me "Return is not allowed here" Jun 29, 2023 at 9:28
30

You can create an infix function like this:

infix fun Any?.ifNull(block: () -> Unit) { 
  if (this == null) block()
}

Then you can do this:

data ifNull {
  // Do something
}
3
  • This would run ifNull { } only if data is null? Nov 9, 2018 at 18:42
  • I like this when all you really want to do is test for null and do something then exit.
    – JPM
    Jun 3, 2019 at 15:19
  • 3
    Be careful with this approach, because something.ifNull{} will work, whilst something?.ifNull{} is not gonnna be called! Oct 22, 2019 at 10:20
24

Just use a normal if:

if (data == null) {
  // Do something
}
3
  • 1
    And what if data is mutable in a concurrent environment? Aug 17, 2021 at 17:42
  • @AlwynSchoeman Your current function is continuing synchronously and doing whatever you wanted to do in the case data was null at the moment you checked it. If you need to prevent it from being set to some other value while this if block is running, you must synchronize on something whenever working with the property.
    – Tenfour04
    Nov 9, 2021 at 15:16
  • @Tenfour04 threads... Jul 19, 2022 at 19:22
16

You can use below code

myNullable?.let {

} ?: { 
    // do something
}()

also you can omit fun()

myNullable?.let {

} ?: fun() { 
    // do something
}()

or you can call invoke() instead of ()

myNullable?.let {

} ?: fun() { 
    // do something
}.invoke()

Note that returning value differs like below.

val res0 = myNullable?.let {
} ?: () {

}()
val res1 = myNullable?.let {
} ?: fun() {
    "result"    
}()
val res2 = myNullable?.let {
} ?: () {
    "result"    
}()


println("res0:$res0")
println("res1:$res1")
println("res2:$res2")

RESULT:

res0:kotlin.Unit // () {} with empty
res1:kotlin.Unit // fun() {}
res2:result      // () {} with return
2
  • let will apply the function with myNullable as object even if myNullable is null.
    – ssasi
    May 19, 2022 at 10:58
  • @ssasi Could you describe more specific your case? I wrote the answer two years ago, this is needed to be updated if there're something error.
    – iroiroys
    May 19, 2022 at 23:25
2

let can apply on null as well, regardless if the object is null or not:

data.let {d->
    if (d != null){
        // execute this block if data is not null
    } else {
        // for data is null
    }
}

1

Normally you do that with the following language constructs:

data?.also {
    // execute this block if not null
} ?: run {
    // execute this block if null
}

be careful with

data?.let {
    // execute this block if not null
    // but careful, returning null accidenatlly will execute run {} as well.
    null
} ?: run {
    // execute this block if null
}

The let block might return null variable accidentally and the run block will execute as well.

If you don't like the constructs also and run you can change the name to something like below:

inline fun <T> T?.ifNotNull(block: (T) -> Unit): T? {
    if (this != null) {
        block(this)
    }
    return this
}

inline fun <T> T.elseIfNull(block: () -> Unit) {
    if (this == null) { block() }
}

and use like this:

class A
var a1: A? = null
var a2: A? = A()
 
a1.ifNotNull {
    println("a1 is Not Null: $it")
}.elseIfNull {
    println("Is null do something else")           
}

a2.ifNotNull {
    println("a2 is Not Null $it")
}.elseIfNull {
    println("Is null do something else")           
}

Above guarantee the second block won't execute if the top one returns null accidentally.

0

I prefer this solution,

fun runIfNull(any: Any?, block: () -> Unit) {
        if (any == null) block()
}

Which you use as:

runIfNull(any) { // it will run; }

It has an advantage comparing to @Dmitry Ryadnenko's answer, where one might be confused and might use it incorrectly.
There you have a function

infix fun Any?.ifNull(block: () -> Unit) { 
  if (this == null) block()
}

And in case you use it on a null object in the way:

nullObject?.ifNull { // THIS WILL NOT BE CALLED }
nullObject.ifNull { // this will be called }

The block is not going to be executed.
Please note the mistakenly added question mark '?'

0

Following answer is simpler version of this answer.
Function returns valid list if chain calls are successful
else
returns emptyList()

class A(var b: B? = null)
class B(var c: C? = null)
class C(var d: D? = null)
class D(var list: List<String>?)

//1. Note ? in A?.<functionName>
fun A?.isNull(): List<String> {
    if(this == null) { // 2. access object using this keyword
        return emptyList<String>()
    }
    return this.b?.c?.d?.list ?: emptyList<String>()
}

fun main() {
    //1. Empty A object
    var a: A? = A()
    println(a.isNull()) //[]
    
    //2. Null A object
    a = null
    println(a.isNull())  //[]
    
    //3. All Valid chaining parameters
    val d = D(listOf("d"))
    val c = C(d)
    var b : B? = B(c)
    a = A(b)
    println(a.isNull())  //[d]
    
    //4. Invalid chain parameter
    b = null
    a = A(b)
    println(a.isNull()) //[]
}

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