4

I have a series of checks I need to run on sensor data, the checks are all independent so they can't be formatted as elifs or elses, if any checks fail, I need to print this to the user. If none of the checks fail I want to tell the user the sensor is okay

(i is just an iterator going over all the sensors in the array)

if worst_stdev[i] > 5:
    print("Sensor bad, STDEV VALUE: {}".format(worst_stdev[i]))
if worst_invalid[i] > 2:
    print("Sensor bad, INVALID VALUE: {}".format(worst_invalid[i]))
if worst_err[i] > 1:
    print("Sensor bad, ERROR VALUE: {}".format(worst_bit_err[i]))
if not (worst_stdev[i] > 5 or worst_invalid[i] > 2 or worst_err[i] > 1):
    print("Sensor OK")

The last if statement bugs me the most, it feels redundant (and possibly slower?) to check again for all the things I've already checked. Is there good way to make this more elegant?

  • 1
    use if: elif: to check for multiple conditions – Stack Aug 21 '17 at 14:53
  • 2
    You could alias the comparisons: bad_sensor_stdev = worst_stdev[i] > 5. Then you don't perform them twice and can give them meaningful names, making the code more readable. – jonrsharpe Aug 21 '17 at 14:53
  • Your code seems fine to me. If the if conditions must remain independent, your code might be close to optimal. You might as well leave out the last check, following the philosophy that CLI programs should not output any message unless there is an error. – Richard Neumann Aug 21 '17 at 15:10
8

I would keep a flag variable that keeps track of errors. For example:

was_error = False
if worst_stdev[i] > 5:
    print("Sensor bad, STDEV VALUE: {}".format(worst_stdev[i]))
    was_error = True
if worst_invalid[i] > 2:
    print("Sensor bad, INVALID VALUE: {}".format(worst_invalid[i]))
    was_error = True
if worst_err[i] > 1:
    print("Sensor bad, ERROR VALUE: {}".format(worst_bit_err[i]))
    was_error = True
if not was_error:
    print("Sensor OK")

Alternatively you could have several different error variables so that you can tell which error occurred. If you don't care which error was thrown, but do want to know how many of them there were, you can increment the error variable each time. This has the upshot of still working with the syntax if not was_error:

6

Perform all three comparisons and store the value in variable before the ifs. This is to ensure we perform comparison only once. This way we avoid introducing new flags. It is also more readable. Also use any at the last if statemeny. It is more readable that way. (thanks @SethMMorton)

bad_stdev = worst_stdev[i] > 5
bad_invalid = worst_invalid[i] > 2
bad_err = worst_err[i] > 1
if bad_stdev:
    print("Sensor bad, STDEV VALUE: {}".format(worst_stdev[i]))
if bad_invalid:
    print("Sensor bad, INVALID VALUE: {}".format(worst_invalid[i]))
if bad_err:
    print("Sensor bad, ERROR VALUE: {}".format(worst_bit_err[i]))
if not any([bad_stdev, bad_invalid, bad_err]):
    print("Sensor OK")
  • 1
    why recalculating the worst_stdev[i] > 5, etc since you already know they are True? – Ev. Kounis Aug 21 '17 at 15:02
  • 1
    This does perform the comparison twice, and leaves you with a potential name error (or reuse of previous, no-longer-correct value). – jonrsharpe Aug 21 '17 at 15:02
  • Correct. see the edit. – OLIVER.KOO Aug 21 '17 at 15:03
  • 1
    Why are you initialising them to False rather than just the result they will subsequently be assigned? – asongtoruin Aug 21 '17 at 15:08
  • 2
    @OLIVER.KOO Yor misunderstand the question about initialization. The suggestion that rather than initialize to False, initialize to the condition. For example, bad_invalid = worst_invalid[i] > 2; if bad_invalid: print("Sensor bad..."). No need to explicitly set True or False. If this change is made it will be a good answer. – SethMMorton Aug 21 '17 at 15:29
1

It really is a matter of context.

If you have many possible diverse conditions, you may pass both conditions and cases in a special function, for example:

    def check_cases(i, cases, text='sensor bad'):
        for case, (param, condition) in cases.items():
            value = param[i]
            if condition(value):
                yield ValueError(f'{text}: {value}')

And then provide some sequence of conditions to it.

cases = {'stdev value': (worst_stdev, lambda x: x > 5), 'invalid value': (worst_invalid, lambda x: x > 2), 'error value': (worst_bit_err, lambda x: x > 1)}

errors = list(check_cases(1, cases))

Then printing itself is obvious:

for err in errors:
    print(err)

if not errors:
    print('OK')

But, if all you really need is just these three comparisons you posted, you'd better stick with your own decision. It's quite clear and readable.

0

It depends on how your code is being executed. You could do something like this and catch the exception so it wont get to the final print statement (obviously you'd have to define the Exception):

if worst_stdev[i] > 5:
    raise BadSensorException("Sensor bad, STDEV VALUE: {}".format(worst_stdev[i]))
if worst_invalid[i] > 2:
    raise BadSensorException("Sensor bad, INVALID VALUE: {}".format(worst_invalid[i]))
if worst_err[i] > 1:
    raise BadSensorException("Sensor bad, ERROR VALUE: {}".format(worst_bit_err[i]))

print("Sensor OK")
  • 1
    why is i not an input to the method? – asongtoruin Aug 21 '17 at 15:00

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