12

I would like to randomly sort a result in a repeatable fashion for purposes such as paging. For this NEWID() is too random in that the same results cannot be re-obtained. Order by Rand(seed) would be ideal as with the same seed the same random collection would result. Unfortunately, the Rand() state resets with every row, does anyone have a solution?

declare @seed as int;
set @seed = 1000;

create table temp (
id int,
date datetime)

insert into temp (id, date) values (1,'20090119')
insert into temp (id, date) values (2,'20090118')
insert into temp (id, date) values (3,'20090117')
insert into temp (id, date) values (4,'20090116')
insert into temp (id, date) values (5,'20090115')
insert into temp (id, date) values (6,'20090114')

-- re-seeds for every item
select *, RAND(), RAND(id+@seed) as r from temp order by r
--1 2009-01-19 00:00:00.000 0.277720118060575   0.732224964471124
--2 2009-01-18 00:00:00.000 0.277720118060575   0.732243597442382
--3 2009-01-17 00:00:00.000 0.277720118060575   0.73226223041364
--4 2009-01-16 00:00:00.000 0.277720118060575   0.732280863384898
--5 2009-01-15 00:00:00.000 0.277720118060575   0.732299496356156
--6 2009-01-14 00:00:00.000 0.277720118060575   0.732318129327415
-- Note how the last column is +=~0.00002

drop table temp

-- interestingly this works:
select RAND(@seed), RAND()
--0.732206331499865 0.306382810665955

Note, I tried Rand(ID) but that just turns out to be sorted. Apparently Rand(n) < Rand(n+1)

13

Building off of gkrogers hash suggestion this works great. Any thoughts on performance?

declare @seed as int;
set @seed = 10;

create table temp (
id int,
date datetime)

insert into temp (id, date) values (1,'20090119')
insert into temp (id, date) values (2,'20090118')
insert into temp (id, date) values (3,'20090117')
insert into temp (id, date) values (4,'20090116')
insert into temp (id, date) values (5,'20090115')
insert into temp (id, date) values (6,'20090114')

-- re-seeds for every item
select *, HASHBYTES('md5',cast(id+@seed as varchar)) r
from temp order by r
--1 2009-01-19 00:00:00.000 0x6512BD43D9CAA6E02C990B0A82652DCA
--5 2009-01-15 00:00:00.000 0x9BF31C7FF062936A96D3C8BD1F8F2FF3
--4 2009-01-16 00:00:00.000 0xAAB3238922BCC25A6F606EB525FFDC56
--2 2009-01-18 00:00:00.000 0xC20AD4D76FE97759AA27A0C99BFF6710
--3 2009-01-17 00:00:00.000 0xC51CE410C124A10E0DB5E4B97FC2AF39
--6 2009-01-14 00:00:00.000 0xC74D97B01EAE257E44AA9D5BADE97BAF

drop table temp

EDIT: Note, the declaration of @seed as it's use in the query could be replace with a parameter or with a constant int if dynamic SQL is used. (declaration of @int in a TSQL fashion is not necessary)

  • Accepted, this was the only method that worked for me – ccook Jan 22 '09 at 13:12
  • May I ask if you tried my method? It does not require any extra variables or a stored proc. – JosephStyons Jan 23 '09 at 20:51
  • I just tried, unfortunately it didnt provide the reliability. The declarations above are just to provide a complete environment in order to replicate the problem. The temp table is to be representative. – ccook Jan 24 '09 at 2:14
1

You can use a value from each row to re-evaluate the rand function:

Select *, Rand(@seed + id) as r from temp order by r

adding the ID ensures that the rand is reseeded for each row. But for a value of seed you will always get back the same sequence of rows (provided that the table does not change)

  • Thank you JayArr. I did try this, but unfortunately it ends up being ascended. Apparently the first random value is fairly predictable. I will update the question with that note as well. – ccook Jan 19 '09 at 16:31
1

Creating a hash can be much more time consuming than creating a seeded random number.

To get more variation in the ourput of RAND([seed]) you need to make the [seed] vary significantly too. Possibly such as...

SELECT
    *,
    RAND(id * 9999)    AS [r]
FROM
   temp
ORDER BY
   r

Using a constant ensures the replicability you asked for. But be careful of the result of (id * 9999) causing an overflow if you expect your table to get big enough...

  • 1
    I think this runs the same problem as the above, where the values are incremental. – ccook Jan 19 '09 at 20:34
  • SELECT RAND(9999 * 1), RAND(9999 * 2), RAND(9999 * 3), RAND(9999 * 4), RAND(9999 * 5) 0.899884439852407 0.0861955322535983 0.27250661186434 0.458817691475082 0.645128771085824 Isn't incremental, but isn't truely random either... – MatBailie Jan 20 '09 at 9:36
  • Which database are you running this against? SQL2008? – ccook Jan 21 '09 at 13:10
1
SELECT *, checksum(id) AS r FROM table ORDER BY r

This kind of works. Although the output from checksum() does not look all that random to me. The MSDN Documentation states:

[...], we do not recommend using CHECKSUM to detect whether values have changed, unless your application can tolerate occasionally missing a change. Consider using HashBytes instead. When an MD5 hash algorithm is specified, the probability of HashBytes returning the same result for two different inputs is much lower than that of CHECKSUM.

But may be it faster.

  • interesting, how so? – ccook Jan 30 '09 at 19:18
  • Clarified my answer a bit. But it is the solution you already came up with anyway. Kind of. – dummy Feb 2 '09 at 18:07
0

After doing some reading this is an accepted method.

Select Rand(@seed) -- now rand is seeded

Select *, 0 * id + Rand() as r from temp order by r

Having id in the expression causes it to be reevaluated every row. But multiplying it by 0 ensures that it doesnt not affect the outcome of rand.

What a horrible way of doing things!

  • Did this work for you? I get a constant r column. It also generates an extra result. Maybe it has to be within a sp? insane though, wow. – ccook Jan 19 '09 at 16:58
  • This does not seem to work for me in SQL Server 2005. – Jonas Lincoln Jan 20 '09 at 14:40
  • In my test (on SQL Server 2008 R2), RAND() is only ever evaluated once. Under what conditions does it ever evaluate to something different in each row? – binki Feb 3 '15 at 19:44
0

This has worked well for me in the past, and it can be applied to any table (just bolt on the ORDER BY clause):

SELECT *
FROM MY_TABLE
ORDER BY  
  (SELECT ABS(CAST(NEWID() AS BINARY(6)) % 1000) + 1);
  • 1
    It sorts randomly, however, it does not give repeatable results. Same behavior as order by newid()? – ccook Jan 24 '09 at 2:13
  • Sorry, I did not read the question properly. – JosephStyons Jan 26 '09 at 20:55
0
create table temp (
id int,
date datetime)

insert into temp (id, date) values (1,'20090119')
insert into temp (id, date) values (2,'20090118')
insert into temp (id, date) values (3,'20090117')
insert into temp (id, date) values (4,'20090116')
insert into temp (id, date) values (5,'20090115')
insert into temp (id, date) values (6,'20090114')

-- re-seeds for every item
select *, NEWID() r
from temp order by r

drop table temp

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