Update: not sure if this is possible without some form of a loop, but np.where will not work here. If the answer is, "you can't", then so be it. If it can be done, it may use something from scipy.signal.


I'd like to vectorize the loop in the code below, but unsure as to how, due to the recursive nature of the output.

Walk-though of my current setup:

Take a starting amount ($1 million) and a quarterly dollar distribution ($5,000):

dist = 5000.
v0 = float(1e6)

Generate some random security/account returns (decimal form) at monthly freq:

r = pd.Series(np.random.rand(12) * .01,
              index=pd.date_range('2017', freq='M', periods=12))

Create an empty Series that will hold the monthly account values:

value = pd.Series(np.empty_like(r), index=r.index)

Add a "start month" to value. This label will contain v0.

from pandas.tseries import offsets
value = (value.append(Series(v0, index=[value.index[0] - offsets.MonthEnd(1)]))
              .sort_index())

The loop I'd like to get rid of is here:

for date in value.index[1:]:
    if date.is_quarter_end:
        value.loc[date] = value.loc[date - offsets.MonthEnd(1)] \
                        * (1 + r.loc[date]) - dist
    else:
        value.loc[date] = value.loc[date - offsets.MonthEnd(1)] \
                        * (1 + r.loc[date]) 

Combined code:

import pandas as pd
from pandas.tseries import offsets
from pandas import Series
import numpy as np

dist = 5000.
v0 = float(1e6)
r = pd.Series(np.random.rand(12) * .01, index=pd.date_range('2017', freq='M', periods=12))
value = pd.Series(np.empty_like(r), index=r.index)
value = (value.append(Series(v0, index=[value.index[0] - offsets.MonthEnd(1)])).sort_index())
for date in value.index[1:]:
    if date.is_quarter_end:
        value.loc[date] = value.loc[date - offsets.MonthEnd(1)] * (1 + r.loc[date]) - dist
    else:
        value.loc[date] = value.loc[date - offsets.MonthEnd(1)] * (1 + r.loc[date]) 

In psuedocode, what is loop is doing is just:

for each date in index of value:
    if the date is not a quarter end:
        multiply previous value by (1 + r) for that month
    if the date is a quarter end:
        multiply previous value by (1 + r) for that month and subtract dist

The issue is, I don't currently see how vectorization is possible since the successive value depends on whether or not a distribution was taken in the month prior. I get to the desired result, but pretty inefficiently for higher frequency data or larger time periods. enter image description here

  • 2
    Don't use floats for money. Ever. (Unless in your model, it's a purely theoretical construct and the resulting sums don't have to match) – ivan_pozdeev Aug 24 '17 at 15:05
  • 4
    Thanks. Let's ignore that little detail for now... – Brad Solomon Aug 24 '17 at 15:10
  • 3
    LOL. This remark made my day =) (I just imagined your boss' face when they would hear that) – ivan_pozdeev Aug 24 '17 at 15:23
up vote 8 down vote accepted
+100

You could use the following code:

cum_r = (1 + r).cumprod()
result = cum_r * v0
for date in r.index[r.index.is_quarter_end]:
     result[date:] -= cum_r[date:] * (dist / cum_r.loc[date])

You would make:

  • 1 cumulative product for all monthly returns.
  • 1 vector multiplication with scalarv0
  • n vector multiplication with scalar dist / cum_r.loc[date]
  • n vector subtractions

where n is the number of quarter ends.

Based on this code we can optimize further:

cum_r = (1 + r).cumprod()
t = (r.index.is_quarter_end / cum_r).cumsum()
result = cum_r * (v0 - dist * t)

which is

  • 1 cumulative product (1 + r).cumprod()
  • 1 division between two series r.index.is_quarter_end / cum_r
  • 1 cumulative sum of the above division
  • 1 multiplication of the above sum with scalar dist
  • 1 subtraction of scalar v0 with dist * t
  • 1 dotwise multiplication of cum_r with v0 - dist * t
  • To apply to DataFrames rather than Series you can use r.index.is_quarter_end.reshape((-1,1)) – Brad Solomon Aug 25 '17 at 13:12
  • 1
    yes it does. my point is that .reshape((-1,1)) is needed if r is a DataFrame rather than Series. But I didn't specify that in my question and your response is already on the money – Brad Solomon Aug 25 '17 at 15:26
  • Ah ok. Thanks for the tip! – JuniorCompressor Aug 25 '17 at 15:58

Ok... I'm taking a stab at this.

import numpy as np 
import pandas as pd

#Define a generator for accumulating deposits and returns
def gen(lst):
    acu = 0
    for r, v in lst:
        yield acu * (1 + r) +v
        acu *= (1 + r)
        acu += v


dist = 5000.
v0 = float(1e6)
random_returns = np.random.rand(12) * 0.1

#Create the index. 
index=pd.date_range('2016-12-31', freq='M', periods=13)
#Generate a return so that the value at i equals the return from i-1 to i
r = pd.Series(np.insert(random_returns, 0,0), index=index, name='Return')
#Generate series with deposits and withdrawals
w = [-dist if is_q_end else 0 for is_q_end in index [1:].is_quarter_end]
d = pd.Series(np.insert(w, 0, v0), index=index, name='Movements')

df = pd.concat([r, d], axis=1)
df['Value'] = list(gen(zip(df['Return'], df['Movements'])))

now, your code

#Generate some random security/account returns (decimal form) at monthly freq:
r = pd.Series(random_returns,
          index=pd.date_range('2017', freq='M', periods=12))
#Create an empty Series that will hold the monthly account values:
value = pd.Series(np.empty_like(r), index=r.index)
#Add a "start month" to value. This label will contain v0.
from pandas.tseries import offsets
value = (value.append(pd.Series(v0, index=[value.index[0] - offsets.MonthEnd(1)])).sort_index())
#The loop I'd like to get rid of is here:

def loopy(value) :
    for date in value.index[1:]:
        if date.is_quarter_end:
            value.loc[date] = value.loc[date - offsets.MonthEnd(1)] \
                           * (1 + r.loc[date]) - dist
        else:
           value.loc[date] = value.loc[date - offsets.MonthEnd(1)] \
                           * (1 + r.loc[date]) 

   return value

and comparing and timing

(loopy(value)==list(gen(zip(r, d)))).all()
Out[11]: True

returns same result

%timeit list(gen(zip(r, d)))
%timeit loopy(value)
10000 loops, best of 3: 72.4 µs per loop
100 loops, best of 3: 5.37 ms per loop

and appears to be somewhat faster. Hope it helps.

  • This looks to be the faster solution for Series input, but having trouble applying it to a DataFrame – Brad Solomon Aug 25 '17 at 13:07
  • Hi. Great. Edited my response to show how I would do it (assuming I understand your issue correctly). For some reason the execution slows down quite a bit when it is assigned to the dataframe. Perhaps it is faster to store an intermediate list? – mortysporty Aug 25 '17 at 13:20

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