5

I'm doing some calculations which give very small decimal numbers for example, 0.0000082

When I'm saving it in a variable, it changes into exponent form. I need the result as a string in the end. So, converting the result using str() is not possible because it keeps the e in the string. I need the string to have exactly 8 decimal places. Is there any way to do this while keeping the 8 digit precision intact?

Another example: 5.8e-06 should be converted to '0.00000580' The trailing zero in the final string is not important. I need the string to be used elsewhere. So, this shouldn't be done in the print() function.

9

The exponential notation is not an inherent property of the number (which is stored as a binary floating point value). It's just the default representation when converting the number to a string with str. You can specify your own formatting options if you convert the number to a string using the format function. Try something like this:

format(5.8e-06, '.8f')

The 8 in the format specifier tells it to use eight digits of precision, while the f requests it to be written as a plain decimal without exponential notation. You can read more about the format notations in the documentation.

1
  • Thank you for the explanation. It gives much more insight. I will accept this answer. – aste123 Aug 22 '17 at 18:10
5

Just another idea:

'{0:.7f}'.format(0.0000082)
0
3

you can try with :

import decimal

print(str(decimal.Decimal(5.8e-06))[:10])

>>> 0.00000580
3
  • Exactly what I was looking for. Thank you very much. – aste123 Aug 22 '17 at 18:04
  • i'm just looking for a better slicing.. wait a sec – PRMoureu Aug 22 '17 at 18:04
  • Yes, the integer part will not be preserved by this method. – aste123 Aug 22 '17 at 18:10
3
print ("{:.6f}".format(1e-4))

will print out

0.000100
2

You could use print:

>>> number = 1e-08
>>> number
1e-08
>>>print("{:.12f}".format(float(number)))
0.000000010000

or You could convert number and store it in string:

>>> str1 = "{:.12f}".format(float(number))
>>> str1
'0.000000010000'

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.