287

As the question states, I would mainly like to know whether or not my code is running in the simulator, but would also be interested in knowing the specific iphone version that is running or being simulated.

EDIT: I added the word 'programmatically' to the question name. The point of my question is to be able to dynamically include / exclude code depending on which version / simulator is running, so I'd really be looking for something like a pre-processor directive that can provide me this info.

2
  • I'm not sure a pre-processor directive is dynamic (though it might be what you were looking for anyway). The directive means that you actually knew, when you built it, where it was going to wind up running. Apr 15, 2016 at 19:18
  • As I know my target is only a new iPhone or Simulator, I like __x86_64__ ( iPhone simulator ) and __arm64__ ( iPhone device ) Oct 1, 2020 at 10:58

21 Answers 21

364

Already asked, but with a very different title.

What #defines are set up by Xcode when compiling for iPhone

I'll repeat my answer from there:

It's in the SDK docs under "Compiling source code conditionally"

The relevant definition is TARGET_OS_SIMULATOR, which is defined in /usr/include/TargetConditionals.h within the iOS framework. On earlier versions of the toolchain, you had to write:

#include "TargetConditionals.h"

but this is no longer necessary on the current (Xcode 6/iOS8) toolchain.

So, for example, if you want to check that you are running on device, you should do

#if TARGET_OS_SIMULATOR
    // Simulator-specific code
#else
    // Device-specific code
#endif

depending on which is appropriate for your use-case.

14
  • 1
    Thanks. I agree with you this is a more specific version of your original question. If yours had come up in my original search, I wouldn't have even needed to ask. Jan 19, 2009 at 21:06
  • 5
    Be careful with these definitions. When you compile code with menu item 'Project > Set Active SDK > Simulator…', as TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR as TARGET_OS_IPHONE variables are both defined! So the only right way to separate logic is pointed out below by Pete (Thanks dude).
    – Vadim
    Jan 24, 2009 at 2:05
  • 5
    Watch the #if and #ifdef difference. For me it was the cause of incorrect behavior.
    – Anton
    Jan 9, 2010 at 9:32
  • 7
    Perhaps the need to include TargetConditionals has been obviated since this was written, but just wanted to note that #if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR works without including TargetConditionals.h now.
    – dmur
    Mar 4, 2014 at 23:34
  • 1
    @Dimitris It's good practice. You don't know how TARGET_OS_SIMULATOR has been defined, so !(TARGET_OS_SIMULATOR) may not be identical to !TARGET_OS_SIMULATOR May 19, 2017 at 12:00
106

Updated code:

This is purported to work officially.

#if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR
NSString *hello = @"Hello, iPhone simulator!";
#elif TARGET_OS_IPHONE
NSString *hello = @"Hello, device!";
#else
NSString *hello = @"Hello, unknown target!";
#endif

Original post (since deprecated)

This code will tell you if you are running in a simulator.

#ifdef __i386__
NSLog(@"Running in the simulator");
#else
NSLog(@"Running on a device");
#endif
3
  • 7
    As of iOS 8 and Xcode 6.1.1 the TARGET_OS_IPHONE is true on the simulator.
    – malhal
    Jan 11, 2015 at 20:28
  • 4
    this doesn't worik anymore on newer XCode versions Jan 25, 2016 at 18:01
  • 1
    Unless you are in 2016 and run a 64 bit simulator. Or in 2019 and run your code on an iPhone with Intel processor.
    – gnasher729
    Apr 5, 2016 at 8:40
61

Not pre-processor directive, but this was what I was looking for when i came to this question;

NSString *model = [[UIDevice currentDevice] model];
if ([model isEqualToString:@"iPhone Simulator"]) {
    //device is simulator
}
5
  • 9
    [model compare:iPhoneSimulator] == NSOrderedSame should be written as [model isEqualToString:iPhoneSimulator]
    – user102008
    Jan 11, 2011 at 22:51
  • 18
    Or [model hasSuffix:@"Simulator"] if you only care about "simulator" in general, not iPhone or iPad in particular. This answer won't work for iPad simulator :)
    – Nuthatch
    Aug 12, 2014 at 15:37
  • Upvoted because Nuthatch's comment makes this the best answer in toto. Apr 9, 2015 at 19:52
  • 12
    In iOS9, check the device name instead of model
    – n.Drake
    Oct 29, 2015 at 8:51
  • 2
    The code won't work if a user adds Simulator word in his device name
    – mbelsky
    May 9, 2016 at 8:12
56

THERE IS A BETTER WAY NOW!

As of Xcode 9.3 beta 4 you can use #if targetEnvironment(simulator) to check.

#if targetEnvironment(simulator)
//Your simulator code
#endif

UPDATE
Xcode 10 and iOS 12 SDK supports this too.

2
  • 1
    This is the only that works for me, rest of the solutions didn't work. May 17, 2018 at 15:59
  • Note This is only in swift.
    – Matt S.
    May 1, 2020 at 3:16
55

The best way to do this is:

#if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR

and not

#ifdef TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR

since its always defined: 0 or 1

44

In case of Swift we can implement following

We can create struct which allows you to create a structured data

struct Platform {
    static var isSimulator: Bool {
        #if targetEnvironment(simulator)
            // We're on the simulator
            return true
        #else
            // We're on a device
             return false
        #endif
    }
}

Then If we wanted to Detect if app is being built for device or simulator in Swift then .

if Platform.isSimulator {
    // Do one thing
} else {
    // Do the other
}
2
  • Cleanest implementation in my opinion, and it accounts for x86_64 and i386 architectures. Helped me overcome a weird device vs. simulator bug in Core Data. You're the man! May 26, 2016 at 22:01
  • 5
    In Playground, you will get a warning, "Code after 'return' will never be executed". So I think #if #else #endif will be better.
    – DawnSong
    Nov 10, 2017 at 8:40
30

Works for Swift 5 and Xcode 12

Use this code:

#if targetEnvironment(simulator)
   // Simulator
#else
   // Device
#endif
9

All those answer are good, but it somehow confuses newbie like me as it does not clarify compile check and runtime check. Preprocessor are before compile time, but we should make it clearer

This blog article shows How to detect the iPhone simulator? clearly

Runtime

First of all, let’s shortly discuss. UIDevice provides you already information about the device

[[UIDevice currentDevice] model]

will return you “iPhone Simulator” or “iPhone” according to where the app is running.

Compile time

However what you want is to use compile time defines. Why? Because you compile your app strictly to be run either inside the Simulator or on the device. Apple makes a define called TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR. So let’s look at the code :

#if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR

NSLog(@"Running in Simulator - no app store or giro");

#endif
3
  • 1
    How does this improve on other answers?
    – mmmmmm
    Jun 17, 2014 at 16:42
  • @Mark It clarifies a little bit
    – onmyway133
    Jun 18, 2014 at 16:52
  • 6
    Currently, in Xcode 7, iOS 9 Simulator [[UIDevice currentDevice] model] is returning iPhone also instead of iPhone Simulator. So, I think this is not the best approach.
    – eMdOS
    Jan 12, 2016 at 19:11
8

For Swift 4.2 / xCode 10

I created an extension on UIDevice, so I can easily ask for if the simulator is running.

// UIDevice+CheckSimulator.swift

import UIKit

extension UIDevice {

    /// Checks if the current device that runs the app is xCode's simulator
    static func isSimulator() -> Bool {        
        #if targetEnvironment(simulator)
            return true
        #else
            return false
        #endif
    }
}

In my AppDelegate for example I use this method to decide wether registering for remote notification is necessary, which is not possible for the simulator.

// CHECK FOR REAL DEVICE / OR SIMULATOR
if UIDevice.isSimulator() == false {

    // REGISTER FOR SILENT REMOTE NOTIFICATION
    application.registerForRemoteNotifications()
}
6

The previous answers are a little dated. I found that all you need to do is query the TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR macro (no need to include any other header files [assuming you are coding for iOS]).

I attempted TARGET_OS_IPHONE but it returned the same value (1) when running on an actual device and simulator, that's why I recommend using TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR instead.

1
  • TARGET_OS_IPHONE is for code that might run on iOS or on MacOS X. Obviously you would want that code to behave the "iPhone" way on a simulator.
    – gnasher729
    Apr 5, 2016 at 8:41
6

In swift :

#if (arch(i386) || arch(x86_64))
...            
#endif

From Detect if app is being built for device or simulator in Swift

1
  • To distinguish between mac apps: #if ( arch( i386 ) || arch( x86_64 ) ) && !os( OSX ) // we’re on a simulator running on mac, and not a mac app. (For cross platforms code included in mac targets)
    – Bobjt
    Oct 21, 2016 at 21:01
5

Has anyone considered the answer provided here?

I suppose the objective-c equivalent would be

+ (BOOL)isSimulator {
    NSOperatingSystemVersion ios9 = {9, 0, 0};
    NSProcessInfo *processInfo = [NSProcessInfo processInfo];
    if ([processInfo isOperatingSystemAtLeastVersion:ios9]) {
        NSDictionary<NSString *, NSString *> *environment = [processInfo environment];
        NSString *simulator = [environment objectForKey:@"SIMULATOR_DEVICE_NAME"];
        return simulator != nil;
    } else {
        UIDevice *currentDevice = [UIDevice currentDevice];
        return ([currentDevice.model rangeOfString:@"Simulator"].location != NSNotFound);
    }
}
0
4

I had the same problem, both TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR and TARGET_OS_IPHONE are always defined, and are set to 1. Pete's solution works, of course, but if you ever happen to build on something other than intel (unlikely, but who knows), here's something that's safe as long as the iphone hardware doesn't change (so your code will always work for the iphones currently out there):

#if defined __arm__ || defined __thumb__
#undef TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR
#define TARGET_OS_IPHONE
#else
#define TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR 1
#undef TARGET_OS_IPHONE
#endif

Put that somewhere convenient, and then pretend that the TARGET_* constants were defined correctly.

0
1

To include all types of "simulators"

NSString *model = [[UIDevice currentDevice] model];
if([model rangeOfString:@"Simulator" options:NSCaseInsensitiveSearch].location !=NSNotFound)
{
    // we are running in a simulator
}
2
  • 4
    It has nothing to do with Xcode 7. If you run iOS Simulator with iOS8 (from Xcode 7) then this will work. It won't work for iOS9 where [[UIDevice currentDevice] model] returns only "iPhone" if app was launched from iOS Simulator Sep 23, 2015 at 8:46
  • why not -[NSString containsString]?
    – Gobe
    Oct 31, 2016 at 23:23
1

With Swift 4.2 (Xcode 10), we can do this

#if targetEnvironment(simulator)
  //simulator code
#else 
  #warning("Not compiling for simulator")
#endif
1
  • 1
    Just another copy paste
    – J. Doe
    Nov 9, 2018 at 12:03
0

My answer is based on @Daniel Magnusson answer and comments of @Nuthatch and @n.Drake. and I write it to save some time for swift users working on iOS9 and onwards.

This is what worked for me:

if UIDevice.currentDevice().name.hasSuffix("Simulator"){
    //Code executing on Simulator
} else{
    //Code executing on Device
}
2
  • 1
    The code won't work if a user adds Simulator word in his device name
    – mbelsky
    May 9, 2016 at 8:11
  • Unfortunately with XCode 8 UIDevice.current.name reports the name of the machine the Simulator is running on (typically something like "Simon's MacBook Pro" now) so the test has become unreliable. I am still looking into a clean way to fix it.
    – Michael
    Sep 26, 2016 at 11:04
0

/// Returns true if its simulator and not a device

public static var isSimulator: Bool {
    #if (arch(i386) || arch(x86_64)) && os(iOS)
        return true
    #else
        return false
    #endif
}
0

Apple has added support for checking the app is targeted for the simulator with the following:

#if targetEnvironment(simulator)
let DEVICE_IS_SIMULATOR = true
#else
let DEVICE_IS_SIMULATOR = false
#endif
0

if nothing worked, try this

public struct Platform {

    public static var isSimulator: Bool {
        return TARGET_OS_SIMULATOR != 0 // Use this line in Xcode 7 or newer
    }

}
-4

This worked for me best

NSString *name = [[UIDevice currentDevice] name];


if ([name isEqualToString:@"iPhone Simulator"]) {

}
1
  • 2
    On Xcode 7.3, iPhone 6 Plus Simulator returns "iPhone".
    – Eric
    May 11, 2016 at 10:32
-5

In my opinion, the answer (presented above and repeated below):

NSString *model = [[UIDevice currentDevice] model];
if ([model isEqualToString:@"iPhone Simulator"]) {
    //device is simulator
}

is the best answer because it is obviously executed at RUNTIME versus being a COMPILE DIRECTIVE.

3
  • 11
    I disagree. This code ends up in your product, whereas a compiler directive keeps the - on the device unnecessary - routine out. Oct 24, 2013 at 3:16
  • 1
    The compiler directives work because the device and simulators are completely different compile targets - ie you wouldn't use the same binary on both. It has to be compiled to different hardware, so it makes sense in that case.
    – Brad Parks
    Mar 12, 2014 at 22:52
  • Being executed at RUNTIME makes it the worst possible answer.
    – gnasher729
    Apr 5, 2016 at 8:43

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