237

What is the difference between $(window).load(function() {}) and $(document).ready(function() {}) in jQuery?

1
  • 2
    Note that in jQuey 3.x there is no $(window).load(). Use $(window).on('load', function(){}); instead.
    – JP Zhang
    Aug 27 '20 at 15:14

11 Answers 11

283
  • document.ready is a jQuery event, it runs when the DOM is ready, e.g. all elements are there to be found/used, but not necessarily all content.
  • window.onload fires later (or at the same time in the worst/failing cases) when images and such are loaded, so if you're using image dimensions for example, you often want to use this instead.
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  • 43
    shorthand for $(document).ready(function(){}) is $(function(){}) and another important difference from the window.load is that it will run on ALL future calls of the function, even after the initial DOMready. Apr 3 '14 at 21:29
  • 2
    @dbliss Yes I believe onload is shorthand for $(window).on('load'). Both referencing the load event. Mar 19 '16 at 9:10
  • 5
    @MichaelButler - What do you mean with it will run on ALL future calls of the function?
    – BornToCode
    May 22 '16 at 15:17
  • 7
    @MichaelButler: You need to be more clear in your comment. 1) You're talking about the USER executing more $(document).ready code after the DOM is ready. That's such a small use case that it probably wasn't worth confusing everyone with mentioning it. 2) The ENVIRONMENT only calls $(document).ready(f‌​unction(){}) once, when the DOM is ready. If the user, for some reason, executes more $(document).ready after the DOM is ready, then yes, it will be executed immediately.
    – Doug S
    Aug 16 '16 at 3:53
  • 4
    I beg to differ, Michael. Let's just leave it at this and not degrade into useless comments. At least the confused people now have their answer.
    – Doug S
    Aug 16 '16 at 17:57
79
$(document).ready(function() {
 // executes when HTML-Document is loaded and DOM is ready
 alert("document is ready");
});


$(window).load(function() {
 // executes when complete page is fully loaded, including all frames, objects and images
 alert("window is loaded");
});
30

The $(window).load() is NOT available in jQuery 3.0

$( window ).load(function() {
        // Handler for .load() called.
});

To get around it, you can use it as an "Event Handler Attachment"

$( window ).on("load", function() {
        // Handler for .load() called.
});
17

The difference are:

$(document).ready(function() { is jQuery event that is fired when DOM is loaded, so it’s fired when the document structure is ready.

$(window).load() event is fired after whole content is loaded.

9
<html>
<head>
    <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.9.1.min.js"></script>
    <script>
    $( document ).ready(function() {
        alert( "document loaded" );
    });

    $( window ).load(function() {
        alert( "window loaded" );
    });
    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <iframe src="http://stackoverflow.com"></iframe>
</body>
</html>

window.load will be triggered after all the iframe content is loaded

7

$(document).ready happens when all the elements are present in the DOM, but not necessarily all content.

$(document).ready(function() {
    alert("document is ready");
});

window.onload or $(window).load() happens after all the content resources (images, etc) have been loaded.

$(window).load(function() {
    alert("window is loaded");
});
2

From jquery prospective - it's just adding load/onload event to window and document. Check this out:

window.onload vs document.onload

0
0

document.ready (jQuery) document.ready will execute right after the HTML document is loaded property, and the DOM is ready.

DOM: The Document Object Model (DOM) is a cross-platform and language-independent convention for representing and interacting with objects in HTML, XHTML and XML documents.

$(document).ready(function()
{
   // executes when HTML-Document is loaded and DOM is ready
   alert("(document).ready was called - document is ready!");
});

window.load (Built-in JavaScript) The window.load however will wait for the page to be fully loaded, this includes inner frames, images etc. * window.load is a built-in JavaScript method, it is known to have some quirks in old browsers (IE6, IE8, old FF and Opera versions) but will generally work in all of them.

window.load can be used in the body's onload event like this (but I would strongly suggest you avoid mixing code like this in the HTML, as it is a source for confusion later on):

$(window).load(function() 
{
   // executes when complete page is fully loaded, including all frames, objects and images
   alert("(window).load was called - window is loaded!");
});
0

$(window).load is an event that fires when the DOM and all the content (everything) on the page is fully loaded like CSS, images and frames. One best example is if we want to get the actual image size or to get the details of anything we use it.

$(document).ready() indicates that code in it need to be executed once the DOM got loaded and ready to be manipulated by script. It won't wait for the images to load for executing the jQuery script.

<script type = "text/javascript">
    //$(window).load was deprecated in 1.8, and removed in jquery 3.0
    // $(window).load(function() {
    //     alert("$(window).load fired");
    // });

    $(document).ready(function() {
        alert("$(document).ready fired");
    });
</script>

$(window).load fired after the $(document).ready().

$(window).load was deprecated in 1.8, and removed in jquery 3.0

0

I think the $(window).load event is not supported by JQuery 3.x

2
  • 1
    As per the documentation the $(window).load event was removed in JQuery 3.0 Oct 23 '17 at 0:05
  • 2
    This is correct. In order to get around it, you can use it as an "Event Handler Attachment": $( window ).on("load", function() { // Handler for .load() called. }); Sep 5 '18 at 11:21
0

According to DOM Level 2 Events, the load event is supposed to fire on document, not on window. However, load is implemented on window in all browsers for backwards compatibility.

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