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I have the following text written in Arabic, and when I call text.characters.count it returns 298 characters instead of the real number, which is 300.

The text:

هنالك العديد من الأنواع المتوفرة لنصوص لوريم إيبسوم، ولكن الغالبية تم تعديلها بشكل ما عبر إدخال بعض النوادر أو الكلمات العشوائية إلى النص. إن كنت تريد أن تستخدم نص لوريم إيبسوم ما، عليك أن تتحقق أولاً أن ليس هناك أي كلمات أو عبارات محرجة أو غير لائقة مخبأة في هذا النص. بينما تعمل جميع مولّدات نصوص ا

with the mention that there is no surrounding white space, before and after the text.

utf8.characters.count also returns the same wrong number.

How can I obtain the right number of characters given such a string ?

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  • 2
    Why do you think that 300 is the correct number? (It may be obvious to you, but not to the non-Arabic speaking people.) – Can you reduce it to a shorter example? – Martin R Aug 24 '17 at 10:04
  • according to this site it's 300: charactercountonline.com – JAHelia Aug 24 '17 at 10:08
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    This because مولّدات and أولاً, it seems that apple doesn't consider َ٫ and ً as a letters – Wajih Aug 24 '17 at 10:13
  • It's not a duplicate question. @Wiktor – Wajih Aug 24 '17 at 10:17
  • @wajeeh those symols are diacrtics and punctuation (064E ARABIC FATHA, ‎066B ARABIC DECIMAL SEPARATOR, and ‎064B ARABIC FATHATAN). But look at the answer, it uses the code from the one I linked to. And the letter count is 300 as stated by Ahmad. I also get 300 when using .unicodeScalars.count. – Wiktor Stribiżew Aug 24 '17 at 10:23
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Getting the unicode scalar count should gives you the expected result:

let myString = "هنالك العديد من الأنواع المتوفرة لنصوص لوريم إيبسوم، ولكن الغالبية تم تعديلها بشكل ما عبر إدخال بعض النوادر أو الكلمات العشوائية إلى النص. إن كنت تريد أن تستخدم نص لوريم إيبسوم ما، عليك أن تتحقق أولاً أن ليس هناك أي كلمات أو عبارات محرجة أو غير لائقة مخبأة في هذا النص. بينما تعمل جميع مولّدات نصوص ا"

myString.unicodeScalars.count // 300

As mentioned in the Swift - Strings and Characters:

Behind the scenes, Swift’s native String type is built from Unicode scalar values. A Unicode scalar is a unique 21-bit number for a character or modifier, such as U+0061 for LATIN SMALL LETTER A ("a"), or U+1F425 for FRONT-FACING BABY CHICK ("🐥").

However

Regardless of what is the result that you expect, counting "harakat" (separators) like "Fat-ha", "damma", "kasra" as a separated character probably gives wrong result.

For instance: if you tried to check the count of "أولاً" word, you will notice that:

let myString = "أولاً"

myString.characters.count // 4
myString.unicodeScalars.count // 5

as you can see, the TanweenFat-ha character is not counted as a separated character unless you are you counting its unicodeScalars value.

As you mentioned, it seems that charactercountonline.com is counting the "harakat" (separators) as independent characters, which should be logical for non-Arabic speaking people, but that will be wrong counting.


Remark For non-Arabic speaking viewers:

The word "أولاً" contains a Decimal Separator, called "Fat-hatan" or "Tanween Fat-h", this separator should not be counted as a separated character referring to Arabic language grammars; The purpose of using it is to indicates how the spelling of the word should be. This logic should be obvious for Arabic speaking people, that "أولاً" word contains four characters, but not computers when it is related to counting!

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  • Unicode scalar ≠ character. Combined characters are just one example. – Nikolai Ruhe Aug 24 '17 at 10:07
  • @NikolaiRuhe agreed! btw, it my mother tongue language :) I hoped that I described that counting the whole thing might leads to wrong results. – Ahmad F Aug 24 '17 at 10:29
  • And the other is because of the tashdid on مولدات? – Honey Aug 24 '17 at 12:31
  • @Honey Yes, "tashdid" or "shaddah" operator in "مولّدات"; Actually, the shaddah separator is a special case, it should be counted as an independent character, but this is not the case for all other separators. – Ahmad F Aug 24 '17 at 12:35
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[...] when I call text.characters.count it returns 298 characters instead of the real number, which is 300.

All boils down to the definition of a character (of which there are several).

Swift's definition somewhat differs from most other computer languages as it defines a character as a "single extended grapheme cluster":

An extended grapheme cluster is a sequence of one or more Unicode scalars that (when combined) produce a single human-readable character.

So when working with the "character count" it's important to think about what actually want to know: Is it what a human would perceive as a characters—or is it about some (computer) encoding?

Without a proper definition there is no "correct" answer.

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