34

I'm creating a console app in Visual Studio 2010 with c#. I want this app to be stand alone, in that all you need is the exe, and you can run it from anywhere. I also want to use app.config to store connection strings and so on.

My problem is that I can't seem to figure out how to include that app.config data into the compiled exe. I do see it creates appname.exe.config, but I don't want people to have to worry about grabbing two separate files when they get the app.

None of the googling I've done has come up with anything. Is this even possible?

9
  • 2
    possible duplicate of Configuration File as Embedded Resource Jan 3, 2011 at 16:35
  • 1
    Think this through a bit. If it were possible, your user couldn't change the connection string anymore. Defeating the point of having one. A single file is never a problem, it's called setup.exe Jan 3, 2011 at 17:10
  • 1
    Re: duplicate, That one didn't come up in my searching. Which is too bad because it did answer my question. Though I've got to say, hard coding app settings as opposed to a convenient config file leaves me feeling unsatisfied. I guess it's the web programmer in me.
    – Patches
    Jan 3, 2011 at 17:32
  • 17
    Searching for this question returns a lot of "you idiot you don't want to do that" when really "yes I do want to do that because my WCF configuration is easier in app.config and I don't want the user to change it". Also, on a normal user's computer, they hide known file extensions, so they see "appname.exe" and double click it, but that's REALLY appname.exe.config with the extension hidden. If you install it and put a shortcut on their desktop this is not a problem, but do I really have to create an installer for every throw-away program I want to give someone just to avoid this?
    – TCC
    Apr 8, 2014 at 20:42
  • 4
    WCF at least has an option for configuring in code, but some dependent assemblies or even .net framework things require entries in the app config ... I have no option to change that behavior, and the user doesn't need to change those values ... so it is not "Stupid" to want to somehow embed the app config
    – TCC
    Apr 8, 2014 at 20:43

10 Answers 10

13

You can't. Half the point of such config files is to allow changes to the configuration of the app outside of the app itself.

You would simply have to modify your program so that it didn't have a dependency on the app config file -- easiest way to do that would be to just stick the values inside your config into read only global variables.

4
  • I guess I missed the point of config files. I'll have to hard set them.
    – Patches
    Jan 3, 2011 at 17:26
  • 10
    While +1, the problem with this is when a tool puts something into app.config, not you (e.g. when you add a reference to a web service). The user is absolutely not to touch it, and yet it has to be shipped in a separate file. Bonus stupidity: The regular app settings, including connection strings, do get embedded into the exe - you can ship the exe alone and it will connect to the database. But settings for a web service reference don't get embedded, and as soon as you reference one, you have to distribute .config. This is just stupid.
    – GSerg
    May 6, 2014 at 12:06
  • 8
    It's worse when the only reason you need an app.config is to make sure your program refuses to run on .NET 4.0 - because for some reason Microsoft couldn't flag the 4.5.2 requirement in the assembly itself... Feb 7, 2015 at 9:30
  • 2
    Another example of a bad app.config setting: enabling useLegacyJit because you have code like this which to this day crashes on Win10 due to a RyuJIT bug. The work-around is inaccessible to programs that want to ship as a single exe, and this is no user setting in any sense. Apr 17, 2016 at 16:35
9

I can see where you are going with this, but the answer might be a bit more complicated than you were looking for.

  1. Make app.config to be an embedded resource.
  2. Manually parse the app.config to get default app settings / connection strings / etc
  3. Still look for an app.config and override the defaults you read in earlier with the app.config values

This way you have some reasonable defaults that you don't have to maintain separate from you app.config as constants, you can run your app as just an exe, and you can still modify it at runtime by adding back in the app.config.

The one thing to remember, is that reading in the app.config from a resource won't give you the same behavior as the normal app.config. You are basically reading it in and using it by hand.

1
  • 2
    Ug, yea, the idea here make things easier, not harder. It looks like I'm better off just making a settings object in my code.
    – Patches
    Jan 3, 2011 at 17:11
5

You mean you need to add it to the exe as a resource? Well, first of all you cannot, app.config is file based not resource based.

On the other hand, the only point of config file is that you can change it. Otherwise just hard-code or use constants.

4

As others have pointed out, the idea behind a configuration file is to avoid hard-coded values.

What you might do as an alternative is to to write a custom configuration section, with every element optional and with default values. That way anyone who can get by with the defaults doesn't need a config file. But if they need to override a default, they can provide one.

(Sorry, just a bit of brainstorming. I don't have an example available.)

2
  • 10
    Unfortunately Microsoft (ab)used this file for things other than configuration. Namely, it's used to force a .NET 4.5 application to refuse to run on an earlier version of .NET. Bass-ackwards to make this user-configurable (while also making single-exe apps impossible), is it not? Feb 7, 2015 at 9:19
  • 1
    @RomanStarkov: Another unfortunate circumstance is when you want to set gcAllowVeryLargeObjects to true. This is absolutely something the user shouldn't be able to touch, since it can make programs crash if disabled. I'm in disbelief this isn't a standard option in the Project properties in VS.
    – Dan W
    Apr 13 at 20:51
3

Generally, you don't want to do this as your app.config provides a mechanism by which configuration may be done at runtime. As far as you specific goal (maintaining configuration outside of your code, but have it follow the binary), you have a couple of options:

  • Dynamically create a configuration file
  • Store the settings in the registry
  • Store the settings as resource strings within the console application

I am sure there are other, more creative, options available. My recommendation would be for the second option. When the application is first launched, create the necessary keys and set their default values from the executable. That way, if you need to do any debugging at a later date, you can simply run regedit and make any necessary changes without recompiling.

1
  • 1
    I wanted the thing to be totally independent, so I think I'll leave the registry alone. Looks like your option 3 is the best for my purposes.
    – Patches
    Jan 3, 2011 at 17:13
3

Best workaround looks like to create it yourself at the application startup.

  1. Add App.Config as a resource, rename it to "App_Config"
  2. Check if config file exists
  3. If not, write default .config file

Example code:

Program.cs

    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {
        CreateConfigIfNotExists();
    }

    private static void CreateConfigIfNotExists()
    {
        string configFile = string.Format("{0}.config", Application.ExecutablePath);

        if (!File.Exists(configFile))
        {
            File.WriteAllText(configFile, Resources.App_Config);
        }
    }

Remember that it will only write your current config when building. It will not update it automatically when you deploy a new version. It will include the config as is when building. But this could be enough :)

1
  • 2
    Nice solution for some use cases. However, quite often the installer runs with Admin rights and can install under C:\Program Files. The app itself runs without Admin rights, so it cannot write to the folder where EXE is installed (such as under C:\ Program Files).
    – George
    May 31, 2017 at 16:26
2

Please the first answer on this previous post - Configuration File as Embedded Resource

2

Like people are saying here the whole point of a config file is for modifying some settings outside the application. You can hard-code or use constants but you can also use the registry in windows if you want. That way you can make changes to the application and still only have a single exe file.

The code project has some good info about reading, writing and deleting from the registry. http://www.codeproject.com/KB/system/modifyregistry.aspx But be careful when editing the registry. Alot of applications are depending on it so you could destroy some settings if you do something wrong. I recommend reading and then doing.

public string Read(string KeyName)  {
RegistryKey rk = baseRegistryKey;
// Open a subKey as read-only

RegistryKey sk1 = rk.OpenSubKey(subKey);
// If the RegistrySubKey doesn't exist -> (null)

if ( sk1 == null )
{
    return null;
}
else
{
    try 
    {
        // If the RegistryKey exists I get its value
        // or null is returned.
        return (string)sk1.GetValue(KeyName.ToUpper());
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        // AAAAAAAAAAARGH, an error!
        ShowErrorMessage(e, "Reading registry " + KeyName.ToUpper());
        return null;
    }
  }
}

public bool Write(string KeyName, object Value)  {
  try
  {
      // Setting
      RegistryKey rk = baseRegistryKey ;
      // I have to use CreateSubKey 
      // (create or open it if already exits), 
      // 'cause OpenSubKey open a subKey as read-only
      RegistryKey sk1 = rk.CreateSubKey(subKey);
      // Save the value
      sk1.SetValue(KeyName.ToUpper(), Value);
      return true;
  }
  catch (Exception e) {
        // AAAAAAAAAAARGH, an error!
        ShowErrorMessage(e, "Writing registry " + KeyName.ToUpper());
        return false;
    }
  }    

public bool DeleteKey(string KeyName)  {
  try
  {
      // Setting
      RegistryKey rk = baseRegistryKey ;
      RegistryKey sk1 = rk.CreateSubKey(subKey);
      // If the RegistrySubKey doesn't exists -> (true)
      if ( sk1 == null )
          return true;
      else
          sk1.DeleteValue(KeyName);
      return true;
  }
  catch (Exception e)
  {
      // AAAAAAAAAAARGH, an error!
      ShowErrorMessage(e, "Deleting SubKey " + subKey);
      return false;
  }
}

Of course this would only work on Windows. I assume that you are using Visual Studio so you are probably using Windows.

Happy coding and good luck!

1

IL Merge has lot issue with wpf executable also slow. I ended up using Cosura.Fody https://github.com/Fody/Costura and using command line parameter for passing my app config value. Also using iexpress http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IExpress to create final executable with command line args and exe merged together

-3

Take a winform application for example, during compilation, a file 'xxx.EXE.config' will be generated along with the output EXE file. It will contain the 'app.config' settings. Distribute this as well.

1
  • 2
    -1 -- That was what I specifically was trying to avoid. How to avoid doing that was the entirety of my question. I even said -- "I do see it creates appname.exe.config, but I don't want people to have to worry about grabbing two separate files..."
    – Patches
    Sep 29, 2016 at 13:41

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