1

Let's say that I want my application to determine user's fitness level based on some criteria.

The criteria could be something like: age, currently taking medication?, 400m run

At first I though I could create a Map where the value is the fitness level and the key is an object that has all the criteria, but since the criteria are ranges this wouldn't work.

For example: if age is between 18 and 22 and onMedication = false and run400m = [70, 80]

fitness level = GOOD

Now if only one of the parameters is in a different range the fitness level would be different. How could I achieve this?

1

You can use a TreeMap class for this. There are very useful methods to deal with ranges of key values. For example:

    TreeMap<Integer, String> myTreeMap = new TreeMap<>();

    myTreeMap.put(10, "A");
    myTreeMap.put(20, "B");
    myTreeMap.put(30, "C");
    myTreeMap.put(40, "D");

    System.out.println(myTreeMap.floorEntry(25));   

Will be print the second option (20=B). I recommend that you check the TreeMap and all its methods for this case.

1
  • This works fine with this scenario but what If I have multiple ranged parameters each of which is only a partial key to the value in the map?
    – bez
    Aug 28 '17 at 13:49
1

Maybe you could use OOP and do something like this:

public class FitnessApp {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Map<String, Object> params = new HashMap<>();
        params.put("age", 17);
        params.put("onMedication", false);
        System.out.printf(new FitnessLevelCalculator().calculateFor(params).name());
    }
}

class FitnessLevelCalculator {
    private LinkedList<FitnessLevel> fitnessLevels = new LinkedList<>();

    public FitnessLevelCalculator() {
        fitnessLevels.add(new FitnessLevel(FitnessLevelEnum.ATHLETIC, Arrays.asList(new RangeCriteria("age", 18, 25), new BooleanCriteria("onMedication", false))));
        fitnessLevels.add(new FitnessLevel(FitnessLevelEnum.GOOD, Arrays.asList(new RangeCriteria("age", 14, 17), new BooleanCriteria("onMedication", false))));
        fitnessLevels.add(new FitnessLevel(FitnessLevelEnum.ILL, Arrays.asList(new RangeCriteria("age", 16, 17))));
    }

    public FitnessLevelEnum calculateFor(Map<String, Object> params) {
        ListIterator<FitnessLevel> listIterator = fitnessLevels.listIterator();
        while (listIterator.hasNext()) {
            FitnessLevel fitnessLevel = listIterator.next();
            if (fitnessLevel.accept(params)) {
                return fitnessLevel.getLevel();
            }
        }

        return FitnessLevelEnum.NOT_CLASSIFIED;
    }
}

enum FitnessLevelEnum {
    ILL, GOOD, ATHLETIC, NOT_CLASSIFIED
}

class FitnessLevel {
    private List<Criteria> criteriaList = new ArrayList<>();
    private FitnessLevelEnum level;

    public FitnessLevel(FitnessLevelEnum level, List<Criteria> criteriaList) {
        this.criteriaList = criteriaList;
        this.level = level;
    }

    public boolean accept(Map<String, Object> params) {
        for (Criteria criteria : criteriaList) {
            if (!params.containsKey(criteria.getName())) {
                return false;
            }
            if (!criteria.satisfies(params.get(criteria.getName()))) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }

    public FitnessLevelEnum getLevel() {
        return level;
    }
}

abstract class Criteria<T> {
    private String name;

    public Criteria(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public abstract boolean satisfies(T param);

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }
}

class RangeCriteria extends Criteria<Integer> {
    private int min;
    private int max;

    public RangeCriteria(String name, int min, int max) {
        super(name);
        this.min = min;
        this.max = max;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean satisfies(Integer param) {
        return param >= min && param <= max;
    }
}

class BooleanCriteria extends Criteria<Boolean> {
    private Boolean expectedValue;

    public BooleanCriteria(String name, Boolean expectedValue) {
        super(name);
        this.expectedValue = expectedValue;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean satisfies(Boolean param) {
        return param == expectedValue;
    }
}
1
  • This is nice but a bit of an overkill for what I need it for. I think I can just build a string key based on user parameters and use it to map to the corresponding FitnessLevel in the <String, FitnessLevel> map.
    – bez
    Aug 28 '17 at 13:46
0

In your specific case, I don't think it's good to use as a key in Map. There maybe a way to put the Object with all conditions as your business but it's quite complex and not worth to do that. The Interpreter Pattern may help you on this.

Hope this help.

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