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I have a Spring boot app that logs perfectly to the file system (via logging.level/logging.file properties) when run from the commandline with:

java -jar jarfilename.jar

However, when I put the following in my pom.xml in order to create an executable JAR and then attempt to run it as an init script in Ubuntu, the logging doesn't happen at all.

<build>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
            <configuration>
                <executable>true</executable>
            </configuration>
        </plugin>
    </plugins>
</build>

Here are the commands I'm running on Linux:

ln -s /path/to/executablejar.jar /etc/init.d/myapp
chmod a+x /etc/myapp
/etc/init.d/myapp start

I imagine this must be some sort of problem with the logging configuration not accounting for the way in which the executable jar is being launched, but I'm puzzled and would appreciate any guidance.

Here is my logging setup in application.properties:

logging.level.org.springframework=error
logging.level.com.myapp=debug
logging.level.org.hibernate=error
logging.file=/path/to/a.log
  • 1
    Check /var/log/<appname>.log for errors. Are you sure the application even runs? Look for running java processes. Does the application user have permission to write to the path you configured? Your chmod step looks wrong, why chmod the whole etc directory? – Magnus Aug 25 '17 at 0:09
  • @Magnus The application is running. And, yeah, the chmod error was just a copy and paste error. But you are right, the log is in /var/log/appname.log ... I see that the /var/log/ prefix is set in the executable jar. I'm going to have to figure out how to change my build config so it matches (or just uses) what is in application.properties. Thanks! – Mark Nenadov Aug 25 '17 at 13:47
  • Stdout logs end up in /var/log but your file logging should still work with your configured path, it might be permission related, and there might be information in the stdout log to tell you why. – Magnus Aug 27 '17 at 0:56

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