226

I need to determine if an object already exists in an array in javascript.

eg (dummycode):

var carBrands = [];

var car1 = {name:'ford'};
var car2 = {name:'lexus'};
var car3 = {name:'maserati'};
var car4 = {name:'ford'};

carBrands.push(car1);
carBrands.push(car2);
carBrands.push(car3);
carBrands.push(car4);

now the "carBrands" array contains all instances. I'm now looking a fast solution to check if an instance of car1, car2, car3 or car4 is already in the carBrands array.

eg:

var contains =  carBrands.Contains(car1); //<--- returns bool.

car1 and car4 contain the same data but are different instances they should be tested as not equal.

Do I have add something like a hash to the objects on creation? Or is there a faster way to do this in Javascript.

I am looking for the fastest solution here, if dirty, so it has to be ;) In my app it has to deal with around 10000 instances.

no jquery

3
  • Are you going to be checking based on dictionaries, or do you want to test using names? You could using a hash for carBrands, and then just testing on the keys you want.
    – girasquid
    Jan 3 '11 at 18:23
  • 1
    you can use the method some: let contains = carsBrands.some( car => car.name == car1.name) Oct 30 '19 at 16:08
  • 6
    This question is different from the duplicate because it deals with objects rather than primitives. Using a simple === will only work in the simplest case where you have exact references to the objects in the array. Aug 6 '20 at 15:56

12 Answers 12

183

Use something like this:

function containsObject(obj, list) {
    var i;
    for (i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {
        if (list[i] === obj) {
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

In this case, containsObject(car4, carBrands) is true. Remove the carBrands.push(car4); call and it will return false instead. If you later expand to using objects to store these other car objects instead of using arrays, you could use something like this instead:

function containsObject(obj, list) {
    var x;
    for (x in list) {
        if (list.hasOwnProperty(x) && list[x] === obj) {
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

This approach will work for arrays too, but when used on arrays it will be a tad slower than the first option.

8
  • +1. My answer was missing the point. This is the right one. (as a side note you can do exactly what the OP did extending Array.prototype) Jan 3 '11 at 18:30
  • Should add a var before the i or x, for example: for (var x in list)
    – Rob B
    Jul 17 '13 at 9:06
  • @RobB Yeah, looks like I made a copy-paste error -- var i should have been var x. Fixed, thanks for pointing that out.
    – cdhowie
    Jul 17 '13 at 17:05
  • 5
    it should be JSON.stringify(list[i]) === JSON.stringify(obj) and not list[i] === obj Feb 19 '18 at 13:44
  • 3
    @MartínNieva Probably because the object you're looking for isn't in the list, but rather a different object that compares as deeply-equal. In that case, using lodash's isEqual() would be preferable to abusing serialization. (In fact, using lodash, this whole solution becomes a one-liner, combining _.some and _.isEqual: _.some(list, v => _.isEqual(v, o)).)
    – cdhowie
    Dec 23 '19 at 18:34
143

Why don't you use the indexOf method of javascript arrays?

Check this out: MDN indexOf Arrays

Simply do:

carBrands.indexOf(car1);

It will return you the index (position in the array) of car1. It will return -1 if car1 was not found in the array.

http://jsfiddle.net/Fraximus/r154cd9o

Edit: Note that in the question, the requirements are to check for the same object referenced in the array, and NOT a new object. Even if the new object is identical in content to the object in the array, it is still a different object. As mentioned in the comments, objects are passed by reference in JS and the same object can exist multiple times in multiple structures.
If you want to create a new object and check if the array contains objects identical to your new one, this answer won't work (Julien's fiddle below), if you want to check for that same object's existence in the array, then this answer will work. Check out the fiddles here and in the comments.

12
  • 133
    indexOf always return -1 when you try to find object in an array... Tiny example here : jsfiddle.net/7B7dQ/1
    – Julien
    Apr 1 '14 at 14:11
  • 85
    Why does this have 40 upvotes if it plainly doesn't work?
    – waterplea
    Jun 11 '15 at 15:04
  • 16
    Gents, in the question, the OP wanted something like carBrands.Contains(car1). If you do carBrands.indexOf(car1), IT WORKS. Check this out: jsfiddle.net/Fraximus/r154cd9o
    – Frax
    Jun 17 '15 at 8:56
  • 13
    In Julien's fiddle, it won't work because it's a new object, even though they are identical.
    – Frax
    Jun 17 '15 at 8:57
  • 41
    Remember that objects in JS are passed by reference. This means that two objects that have the same properties with the same values are not the same object. It also means that an object can actually exist in multiple arrays simultaneously. Example: jsfiddle.net/7B7dQ/33 Jul 22 '15 at 10:01
33

Having been recently bitten by the FP bug reading many wonderful accounts of how neatly the functional paradigm fits with Javascript

I replicate the code for completeness sake and suggest two ways this can be done functionally.

    var carBrands = [];

  var car1 = {name:'ford'};
  var car2 = {name:'lexus'};
  var car3 = {name:'maserati'};
  var car4 = {name:'ford'};
  var car5 = {name:'toyota'};

  carBrands.push(car1);
  carBrands.push(car2);
  carBrands.push(car3);
  carBrands.push(car4);

  // ES6 approach which uses the includes method (Chrome47+, Firefox43+)

  carBrands.includes(car1) // -> true
  carBrands.includes(car5) // -> false

If you need to support older browsers use the polyfill, it seems IE9+ and Edge do NOT support it. Located in polyfill section of MSDN page

Alternatively I would like to propose an updated answer to cdhowie

// ES2015 syntax
function containsObject(obj, list) {

    return list.some(function(elem) {
      return elem === obj
    })
}

// or ES6+ syntax with cool fat arrows
function containsObject(obj, list) {

    return list.some(elem => elem === obj)
}
3
  • 1
    When I add var car6 = {name:'ford'}; to your first solution and try carBrands.includes(car6), it returns false. Can you explain this? Feb 18 '19 at 13:30
  • @PrasanthGanesan the carBrands is an Array of objects, in this case with the shape of having a key of 'name' and a value of the type of car brand as a string. If you do not push your var car6 object into the array the include method will indeed return false, if you push it onto array it will return true. see my jsbin example - jsbin.com/xeluyizaze/edit?js,console
    – Faktor 10
    Feb 18 '19 at 16:21
  • Same approach but actually comparing the objects: arr.some((e) => Object.entries(e).toString() === Object.entries(obj).toString()) Jan 12 at 10:13
19

try Array.prototype.some()

MDN Array.prototype.some


    function isBiggerThan10(element, index, array) {
      return element > 10;
    }
    [2, 5, 8, 1, 4].some(isBiggerThan10);  // false
    [12, 5, 8, 1, 4].some(isBiggerThan10); // true

0
18

You could use jQuery's grep method:

$.grep(carBrands, function(obj) { return obj.name == "ford"; });

But as you specify no jQuery, you could just make a derivative of the function. From the source code:

function grepArray( elems, callback, inv ) {  
    var ret = [];  

    // Go through the array, only saving the items  
    // that pass the validator function  
    for ( var i = 0, length = elems.length; i < length; i++ ) {  
        if ( !inv !== !callback( elems[ i ], i ) ) {  
            ret.push( elems[ i ] );  
        }  
    }  

    return ret;  
}  

grepArray(carBrands, function(obj) { return obj.name == "ford"; });
1
  • What is inv? Where is it used?
    – Denny
    Aug 10 '17 at 13:42
12

I used underscore javascript library to tweak this issue.

function containsObject(obj, list) {
 var res = _.find(list, function(val){ return _.isEqual(obj, val)});
 return (_.isObject(res))? true:false;
}

please refer to underscore.js documentation for the underscore functions used in the above example.

note: This is not a pure javascript solution. Shared for educational purposes.

9

You can just use the equality operator: ==. Objects are checked by reference by default, so you don't even need to use the === operator.

try this, just make sure you're using the correct variable reference in the place of car1:

var i, car, l = cars.length;

for (i = 0; i < l; i++)
{
  if ((car = cars[i]) == car1)
  {
    break;
  }
  else car = null;
}

Edit to add:

An array extension was mentioned, so here's the code for it:

Array.prototype.contains = Array.prototype.contains || function(obj)
{
  var i, l = this.length;
  for (i = 0; i < l; i++)
  {
    if (this[i] == obj) return true;
  }
  return false;
};

Note that I'm caching the length value, as the Array's length property is actually an accessor, which is marginally slower than an internal variable.

4
  • Since you brought it up. Faster to loop backwards with a while. var i = this.length; while (i--) { ... }; Since going backwards won't hurt here, may as well. ajaxian.com/archives/fast-loops-in-js
    – Hemlock
    Jan 3 '11 at 18:40
  • @Hemlock good point, except it'd have to be this[i-1] in the loop.
    – zzzzBov
    Jan 3 '11 at 18:50
  • Nope, look again. i gets decremented after it gets tested.
    – Hemlock
    Jan 3 '11 at 19:13
  • 1
    "You can just use the equality operator: ==. Objects are checked by reference by default, so you don't even need to use the === operator." I would advise strongly against using the == operator anywhere. It isn't even transitive!
    – cdhowie
    Nov 16 '15 at 21:11
9

I would use a generic iterator of property/value over the array. No jQuery required.

arr = [{prop1: 'val1', prop2: 'val2'}, {prop1: 'val3', prop2: 'val4'}];

objectPropInArray(arr, 'prop1', 'val3'); // <-- returns true

function objectPropInArray(list, prop, val) {
  if (list.length > 0 ) {
    for (i in list) {
      if (list[i][prop] === val) {
        return true;
      }
    }
  }
  return false;  
}
4

You could try sorting the array based on a property, like so:

carBrands = carBrands.sort(function(x,y){
  return (x == y) ? 0 : (x > y) ? 1 : -1;
});

Then you can use an iterative routine to check whether

carBrands[Math.floor(carBrands.length/2)] 
// change carBrands.length to a var that keeps 
// getting divided by 2 until result is the target 
// or no valid target exists

is greater or lesser than the target, and so on, which will let you go through the array quickly to find whether the object exists or not.

1

i know this is an old post, but i wanted to provide a JQuery plugin version and my code.

// Find the first occurrence of object in list, Similar to $.grep, but stops searching 
function findFirst(a,b){
var i; for (i = 0; i < a.length; ++i) { if (b(a[i], i)) return a[i]; } return undefined;
}

usage:

var product = $.findFirst(arrProducts, function(p) { return p.id == 10 });
1

This function is to check for a unique field. Arg 1: the array with selected data Arg 2: key to check Arg 3: value that must be "validated"

function objectUnique( array, field, value )
{
    var unique = true;
    array.forEach(function ( entry )
    {
        if ( entry[field] == value )
        {
            unique = false;
        }
    });

    return unique;
}
0

The most simple way using ES6:

const arr = [{
  prop: 'value'
}]
const obj = {
  prop: 'value'
}
arr.some((e) => Object.entries(e).toString() === Object.entries(obj).toString()) // true

To keep your example:

const carBrands = [];

const car1 = { name:'ford' };
const car2 = { name:'lexus' };
const car3 = { name:'maserati' };
const car4 = { name:'ford' };

carBrands.push(car1);
carBrands.push(car2);
carBrands.push(car3);
carBrands.push(car4);

function containsObject(array, object) {
  return array.some((e) => Object.entries(e).toString() === Object.entries(object).toString())
}



const contains = containsObject(carBrands, car1); // returns bool

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