343

Is there an if-else tag available in JSTL?

1

7 Answers 7

548

Yes, but it's clunky as hell, e.g.

<c:choose>
  <c:when test="${condition1}">
    ...
  </c:when>
  <c:when test="${condition2}">
    ...
  </c:when>
  <c:otherwise>
    ...
  </c:otherwise>
</c:choose>
10
  • 5
    Aside from the wrapper tag (choose), I don't see how this is any more verbose than if/elseif/else would be. One wrapper tag hardly constitutes 'clunky as hell', no? Jan 8, 2011 at 18:25
  • 23
    @Steven: It's the XML nature of it. There's more characters in the boilerplate than there is in the actual logic.
    – skaffman
    Jan 8, 2011 at 18:40
  • 15
    I know I'm a bit late to the party, but <c:otherwise> seems a little verbose, eh?
    – andronikus
    Oct 27, 2011 at 13:29
  • 7
    start nesting logic with appropriate indentation and clunky as hell will seem too kind a description. Aug 5, 2013 at 15:41
  • 4
    One can still use plain old java syntax. I know I'm gonna be hated for this, but el is in no way compulsory. It was meant to be more readable and enforce separation of logic and UI, but it's too often not more readable, and the rest is about discipline.
    – chris
    Sep 23, 2015 at 10:54
107

In addition with skaffman answer, simple if-else you can use ternary operator like this

<c:set value="34" var="num"/>
<c:out value="${num % 2 eq 0 ? 'even': 'odd'}"/>
1
  • 6
    This is a good answer, but is highly situational for how useful it would be.
    – Mike LP
    Aug 3, 2016 at 15:26
53

There is no if-else, just if.

<c:if test="${user.age ge 40}">
 You are over the hill.
</c:if>

Optionally you can use choose-when:

<c:choose>
  <c:when test="${a boolean expr}">
    do something
  </c:when>
  <c:when test="${another boolean expr}">
    do something else
  </c:when>
  <c:otherwise>
    do this when nothing else is true
  </c:otherwise>
</c:choose>
1
  • Hi @iwxfer, your above link is not available right now, please update, if you can as you good score, other wise remove it.
    – Ajay2707
    May 19, 2016 at 5:51
28

I got away with simply using two if tags, thought I'd add an answer in case it's of use to anyone else:

<c:if test="${condition}">
  ...
</c:if>
<c:if test="${!condition}">
  ...
</c:if>

whilst technically not an if-else per se, the behaviour is the same and avoids the clunky approach of using the choose tag, so depending on how complex your requirement is this might be preferable.

4
  • 2
    Consider the case when the condition is something complicated and ugly like ${not param.age gt 42 and someOtherVar eq 'foobar'}. You would have to store the condition into a temporary boolean variable so that you could do !condition, or write the inverse of that condition. Both ugly. The "otherwise" syntax is a guaranteed inverse.
    – matt burns
    May 11, 2016 at 20:27
  • 3
    Indeed a complex condition would require either a local variable or writing the inverse, but both of those options would still work. I clarified that it would depend on how complex the requirement is as to whether this approach would be preferable over the choose tag.
    – jonk
    May 12, 2016 at 15:56
  • 2
    I agree with this. If you have only one else, its less markeup then using c:choose
    – javaMoca
    Aug 15, 2016 at 2:55
  • 1
    There's another additional benefit of having <c:if test="${condition} == true"> and <c:if test="${condition == false}">. When the variable is null (not initialized), neither branch is executed, which is good. If you go with <c:choose> and <c:when>, the false branch will be executed when the variable is null. May 14, 2018 at 22:41
3

you have to use this code:

with <%@ taglib prefix="c" uri="http://www.springframework.org/tags/form"%>

and

<c:select>
            <option value="RCV"
                ${records[0].getDirection() == 'RCV' ? 'selected="true"' : ''}>
                <spring:message code="dropdown.Incoming" text="dropdown.Incoming" />
            </option>
            <option value="SND"
                ${records[0].getDirection() == 'SND'? 'selected="true"' : ''}>
                <spring:message code="dropdown.Outgoing" text="dropdown.Outgoing" />
            </option>
        </c:select>
3

Besides the need to have an else, in many cases you will need to use the same condition on multiple locations.

I prefer to extract the condition into a variable:

<c:set var="conditionVar" value="#{expression}"/>

And after that, you can use the condition variable as many times as you need it:

...
<c:if test="#{conditionVar}">
       ...
</c:if>
<c:if test="#{!conditionVar}">
       ...
</c:if>
...
<c:if test="#{conditionVar}">
       ...
</c:if>
<c:if test="#{!conditionVar}">
       ...
</c:if>
...

The c:choose element is good for more complicated situations, but if you need an if else only, I think this approach is better. It is efficient and has the following benefits:

  • more readable if the variable name is well chosen
  • more reusable because the condition is extracted and the resulting variable can be reused for other ifs and in other expressions. It discourages writing the same condition (and evaluating it) multiple times.
1

This is good and efficient approach as per time complexity prospect. Once it will get a true condition , it will not check any other after this. In multiple If , it will check each and condition.

   <c:choose>
      <c:when test="${condtion1}">
        do something condtion1
      </c:when>
      <c:when test="${condtion2}">
        do something condtion2
      </c:when>
      ......
      ......
      ...... 
      .......

      <c:when test="${condtionN}">
        do something condtionn N
      </c:when>


      <c:otherwise>
        do this w
      </c:otherwise>
    </c:choose>

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