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My Rust program is intented to read a very large (up to several GB), simple text file line by line. The problem is, that this file is too large to be read at once, or to transfer all lines into a Vec<String>.

What would be an idiomatic way to handle this in Rust?

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  • 15
    @Kroltan - Not so much; this page is now the top ranking entry according to a Google search on "efficiently read lines from file in rust". (-: Jan 7, 2019 at 18:47
  • @HuwWalters It was not at the time of posting! Current readers will be directed to any of those duplicates. And I'd dare say that SO posts still qualify as "examples" so the comment is still up-to-date (-:
    – Kroltan
    Jan 7, 2019 at 23:52
  • That was my point; it's a useful page! (irony may have fallen a bit flat though) Jan 9, 2019 at 4:44
  • 12
    I don't agree that this question has already been answered on SO and certainly not by the links present. OP specifically requested a method for very large files where the file is too large to be read at once or read line-by-line, a more efficient method must exist, which makes this a valid question
    – Awalias
    Aug 20, 2019 at 17:56

1 Answer 1

120

You want to use the buffered reader, BufRead, and specifically the function BufReader.lines():

use std::fs::File;
use std::io::{self, prelude::*, BufReader};

fn main() -> io::Result<()> {
    let file = File::open("foo.txt")?;
    let reader = BufReader::new(file);

    for line in reader.lines() {
        println!("{}", line?);
    }

    Ok(())
}

Note that you are not returned the linefeed, as said in the documentation.


If you do not want to allocate a string for each line, here is an example to reuse the same buffer:

fn main() -> std::io::Result<()> {
    let mut reader = my_reader::BufReader::open("Cargo.toml")?;
    let mut buffer = String::new();

    while let Some(line) = reader.read_line(&mut buffer) {
        println!("{}", line?.trim());
    }

    Ok(())
}

mod my_reader {
    use std::{
        fs::File,
        io::{self, prelude::*},
    };

    pub struct BufReader {
        reader: io::BufReader<File>,
    }

    impl BufReader {
        pub fn open(path: impl AsRef<std::path::Path>) -> io::Result<Self> {
            let file = File::open(path)?;
            let reader = io::BufReader::new(file);

            Ok(Self { reader })
        }

        pub fn read_line<'buf>(
            &mut self,
            buffer: &'buf mut String,
        ) -> Option<io::Result<&'buf mut String>> {
            buffer.clear();

            self.reader
                .read_line(buffer)
                .map(|u| if u == 0 { None } else { Some(buffer) })
                .transpose()
        }
    }
}

Playground

Or if you prefer a standard iterator, you can use this Rc trick I shamelessly took from Reddit:

fn main() -> std::io::Result<()> {
    for line in my_reader::BufReader::open("Cargo.toml")? {
        println!("{}", line?.trim());
    }

    Ok(())
}

mod my_reader {
    use std::{
        fs::File,
        io::{self, prelude::*},
        rc::Rc,
    };

    pub struct BufReader {
        reader: io::BufReader<File>,
        buf: Rc<String>,
    }
    
    fn new_buf() -> Rc<String> {
        Rc::new(String::with_capacity(1024)) // Tweakable capacity
    }

    impl BufReader {
        pub fn open(path: impl AsRef<std::path::Path>) -> io::Result<Self> {
            let file = File::open(path)?;
            let reader = io::BufReader::new(file);
            let buf = new_buf();

            Ok(Self { reader, buf })
        }
    }

    impl Iterator for BufReader {
        type Item = io::Result<Rc<String>>;

        fn next(&mut self) -> Option<Self::Item> {
            let buf = match Rc::get_mut(&mut self.buf) {
                Some(buf) => {
                    buf.clear();
                    buf
                }
                None => {
                    self.buf = new_buf();
                    Rc::make_mut(&mut self.buf)
                }
            };

            self.reader
                .read_line(buf)
                .map(|u| if u == 0 { None } else { Some(Rc::clone(&self.buf)) })
                .transpose()
        }
    }
}

Playground

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  • 2
    Note that a new-line is considered to be a LF or a CR followed by a LF. Aug 25, 2017 at 13:29
  • this isn't necessarily the most efficient way if the file size is greater than the available memory
    – Awalias
    Aug 20, 2019 at 17:53
  • 1
    @Awalias I updated my answer to be clearer. If you don't understand something specific, please say me what.
    – Boiethios
    Aug 22, 2019 at 9:21
  • 3
    starting to learn Rust and this was super helpful and informative Dec 20, 2019 at 18:15

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