This seems like a pretty straight forward question, but I can't seem to find the answer anywhere.

In Spring, I can create a listener for an event using the @EventListener annotation, like this:

@Component
public class MyListener {

    @EventListener
    public void handleEvent(ContextRefreshedEvent event) {
        ...
    }
}

However, what if I need the same method to listen to multiple events and act differently based the event that happens?

Intuitively, I'm thinking something similar to this:

    @Component
    public class MyListener {

        @EventListener
        public void handleEvents(ContextRefreshedEvent event, ContextStopped event) {
             String event;
             if(event instanceof ContextRefreshedEvent)
                  event = "Refreshed";
             if(event instanceof ContextStoppedEvent)
                  event = "Stopped";
        }
    }

What is the correct way for the EventListener annotation to listen to multiple events and how can the same method differentiate based on the actual event that happens?

Thanks a lot.

  • Something like this? – Edwin Dalorzo Aug 25 '17 at 15:53
  • Are you looking to listen to custom events or spring events? – Indraneel Bende May 16 at 2:59
  • @IndraneelBende Mostly custom events – pike May 16 at 20:17
up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's nominally easy to create an event listener that listens for multiple events:

@EventListener({EventA.class, EventB.class})
public doSomething() {
   ...
}

But obviously this approach does not give you access to the underlying event. Based on the javadoc for EventListener it does not appear to be possible to do what you are suggesting

If an annotated method supports a single event type, the method may declare a single parameter that reflects the event type to listen to. If an annotated method supports multiple event types, this annotation may refer to one or more supported event types using the classes attribute. See the classes() javadoc for further details.

...

If (the classes) attribute is specified with a single value, the annotated method may optionally accept a single parameter. However, if this attribute is specified with multiple values, the annotated method must not declare any parameters.

Thus there does not appear to be any mechanism to consume multiple events and take a different action based on the body of those events. I would suggest that this shouldn't be necessary though, you could always register event-specific @EventListener methods, and then just have them call a shared method to perform any common functionality.

Source: https://docs.spring.io/spring/docs/current/javadoc-api/org/springframework/context/event/EventListener.html

Since Spring 4.2 you can use subclass in method declaration to handle all events those extends this subclass:

@EventListener
public void handleEvent(ApplicationEvent event) {
  // listen all descendants of the ApplicationEvent
}

Also you can narrow list of events by using annotion's attribute:

@EventListener({ContextRefreshedEvent.class, ApplicationReadyEvent.class})
public void handleEvent(Object event) {
  // listen only ContextRefreshedEvent and ApplicationReadyEvent
}

Why don't you do something like this.

From SpringFramework 4.2, you can publish events without extending ApplicationEvent.

As you replied you want to mostly listen to custom events. You can do something like this.

Create a Base class called BaseEvent.

                         public class BaseEvent {

                         private String type;

                         public BaseEvent() {
                         }

                         public String getType() {
                         return type;
                         }

                        public void setType(String type) {
                        this.type = type;
                        }
                    }

Consider that as the base class whenever you want to publish a custom Event.

Now lets create two custom events called Example1Event and Example2Event.

Example1Event Class

                      public class Example1Event extends BaseEvent {

                      private String message;

                      public Example1Event() {

                      }

                     public String getMessage() {
                     return message;
                     }

                     public void setMessage(String message) {
                     this.message = message;
                     }
                 }

Example2Event Class

                   public class Example2Event extends BaseEvent {

                   private String message;

                   public Example2Event() {
                   }

                  public String getMessage() {
                  return message;
                  }

                 public void setMessage(String message) {
                 this.message = message;
                 }

              }

Your EventListener would look like this.

                 public class EventReceiver {

                  public EventReceiver() {
                  }

                 @EventListener
                 public void receiveEvent(BaseEvent event) {
                 String eventType=event.getType();
                 if(eventType.equals("example1")) {
                 Example1Event example1Event = (Example1Event)event;
                 System.out.println(example1Event.getMessage());
                 }
                 else if(eventType.equals("example2")) {
                 Example2Event example2Event = (Example2Event)event;
                 System.out.println(example2Event.getMessage());
                 } 
             }

           }

This will work for what you want to do.

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