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NumPy has the efficient function/method nonzero() to identify the indices of non-zero elements in an ndarray object. What is the most efficient way to obtain the indices of the elements that do have a value of zero?

9 Answers 9

286

numpy.where() is my favorite.

>>> x = numpy.array([1,0,2,0,3,0,4,5,6,7,8])
>>> numpy.where(x == 0)[0]
array([1, 3, 5])

The method where returns a tuple of ndarrays, each corresponding to a different dimension of the input. Since the input is one-dimensional, the [0] unboxes the tuple's only element.

7
  • 22
    I am trying to remember Python. Why does where() return a tuple? numpy.where(x == 0)[1] is out of bounds. what is the index array coupled to then?
    – Zhubarb
    Jan 7, 2014 at 12:52
  • 8
    no. where returns a tuple of ndarrays, each of them corresponding to a dimension of the input. in this case the input is an array, so the output is a 1-tuple. If x was a matrix, it would be a 2-tuple, and so on May 26, 2017 at 15:23
  • 5
    As of numpy 1.16, the documentation for numpy.where specifically recommends using numpy.nonzero directly rather than calling where with only one argument.
    – jirassimok
    Jul 18, 2019 at 21:54
  • 1
    @jirassimok how do you use nonzero to find zeros as the question asks? Apr 17, 2020 at 5:39
  • 1
    @mLstudent33 Exactly the same way as you would use where, as seen in Dusch's answer. As per where's documentation, where(x) is equivalent to asarray(x).nonzero().
    – jirassimok
    Apr 17, 2020 at 19:37
53

There is np.argwhere,

import numpy as np
arr = np.array([[1,2,3], [0, 1, 0], [7, 0, 2]])
np.argwhere(arr == 0)

which returns all found indices as rows:

array([[1, 0],    # Indices of the first zero
       [1, 2],    # Indices of the second zero
       [2, 1]],   # Indices of the third zero
      dtype=int64)
29

You can search for any scalar condition with:

>>> a = np.asarray([0,1,2,3,4])
>>> a == 0 # or whatver
array([ True, False, False, False, False], dtype=bool)

Which will give back the array as an boolean mask of the condition.

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  • 1
    You can use this to access the zero elements: a[a==0] = epsilon Jun 11, 2015 at 17:59
  • Recently found out about this notation. IMO, one of the ugliest pieces of syntactic sugar. VERY, VERY wrong, like assignment in comparison operators in C. Dec 12, 2022 at 8:38
26

You can also use nonzero() by using it on a boolean mask of the condition, because False is also a kind of zero.

>>> x = numpy.array([1,0,2,0,3,0,4,5,6,7,8])

>>> x==0
array([False, True, False, True, False, True, False, False, False, False, False], dtype=bool)

>>> numpy.nonzero(x==0)[0]
array([1, 3, 5])

It's doing exactly the same as mtrw's way, but it is more related to the question ;)

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  • 2
    This should be the accepted answer as this is the advised use of nonzero method to check conditions.
    – sophros
    Mar 20, 2019 at 9:42
7

You can use numpy.nonzero to find zero.

>>> import numpy as np
>>> x = np.array([1,0,2,0,3,0,0,4,0,5,0,6]).reshape(4, 3)
>>> np.nonzero(x==0)  # this is what you want
(array([0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3]), array([1, 0, 2, 0, 2, 1]))
>>> np.nonzero(x)
(array([0, 0, 1, 2, 3, 3]), array([0, 2, 1, 1, 0, 2]))
6

If you are working with a one-dimensional array there is a syntactic sugar:

>>> x = numpy.array([1,0,2,0,3,0,4,5,6,7,8])
>>> numpy.flatnonzero(x == 0)
array([1, 3, 5])
2
  • This works fine as long as I have only one condition. What if I want to search for "x == numpy.array(0,2,7)"? The result should be array([1,2,3,5,9]). But how can I get this?
    – MoTSCHIGGE
    Aug 8, 2014 at 11:04
  • You could do this with: numpy.flatnonzero(numpy.logical_or(numpy.logical_or(x==0, x==2), x==7))
    – Dusch
    Apr 12, 2016 at 10:20
2

I would do it the following way:

>>> x = np.array([[1,0,0], [0,2,0], [1,1,0]])
>>> x
array([[1, 0, 0],
       [0, 2, 0],
       [1, 1, 0]])
>>> np.nonzero(x)
(array([0, 1, 2, 2]), array([0, 1, 0, 1]))

# if you want it in coordinates
>>> x[np.nonzero(x)]
array([1, 2, 1, 1])
>>> np.transpose(np.nonzero(x))
array([[0, 0],
       [1, 1],
       [2, 0],
       [2, 1])
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import numpy as np
arr = np.arange(10000)
arr[8000:8900] = 0

%timeit np.where(arr == 0)[0]
%timeit np.argwhere(arr == 0)
%timeit np.nonzero(arr==0)[0]
%timeit np.flatnonzero(arr==0)
%timeit np.amin(np.extract(arr != 0, arr))
23.4 µs ± 1.5 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
34.5 µs ± 680 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
23.2 µs ± 447 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
27 µs ± 506 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
109 µs ± 669 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
1
import numpy as np

x = np.array([1,0,2,3,6])
non_zero_arr = np.extract(x>0,x)

min_index = np.amin(non_zero_arr)
min_value = np.argmin(non_zero_arr)

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