63

I'm trying to figure out a way to return results by using the group by function.

GROUP BY is working as expected, but my question is: Is it possible to have group by ignore NULL field. So that it does not group NULLs together because I still need all the rows where the specified field is NULL.

SELECT `table1`.*, 
    GROUP_CONCAT(id SEPARATOR ',') AS `children_ids`
FROM `table1` 
WHERE (enabled = 1) 
GROUP BY `ancestor` 

So now lets say I have 5 rows and ancestor field is NULL, it returns me 1 row....but I want all 5.

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  • 15
    You could use GROUP BY COALESCE(GroupingColumn, PrimaryKey) might need some adjustment for datatypes, composite PKs or whatever. – Martin Smith Aug 12 '11 at 23:12
  • 1
  • @Tomalak Geret'kal: Joe Celko quote: "In SQL, when you do a GROUP BY, you get a partitioning, and the NULLs are all put into one group. This was debated in the ANSI X3H2 Committee. If we had used strict equality, each NULL would be its own class and things would be a mess. So we invented grouping. Grouping is handy for many queries and not just for aggregate functions. It has the nice property of getting us back to two valued logic (2VL) and we like that." – onedaywhen Aug 15 '11 at 9:12
  • 2
    Suggestion: remove the rows WHERE ancestor is NOT NULL then UNION the rows WHERE ancestor is NULL using an appropriate default value for children_ids. I think such a query would be easier to maintain. – onedaywhen Aug 15 '11 at 9:14
  • @onedaywhen: That's a good idea. – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 15 '11 at 9:48
64

Perhaps you should add something to the null columns to make them unique and group on that? I was looking for some sort of sequence to use instead of UUID() but this might work just as well.

SELECT `table1`.*, 
    IFNULL(ancestor,UUID()) as unq_ancestor
    GROUP_CONCAT(id SEPARATOR ',') AS `children_ids`
FROM `table1` 
WHERE (enabled = 1) 
GROUP BY unq_ancestor
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  • Thank you this worked! Thanks for introducing the UUID function to me. – slik Jan 3 '11 at 22:44
  • 1
    Be careful; without testing I'm not certain UUID() will produce a unique value for each row but simply demonstrates the concept of adding a unique value for NULLS. – bot403 Jan 3 '11 at 22:53
  • 11
    why not just use primary key instead of UUID() function? – Ivan Virabyan Aug 15 '12 at 14:34
  • uuid does not provide uniqe id for each row, have to use pk instead – slier Jun 17 '13 at 20:08
  • 3
    If you use primary key, it may have the same value as the ancestor value and cause errors – Remade Feb 16 '15 at 9:48
40

When grouping by column Y, all rows for which the value in Y is NULL are grouped together.

This behaviour is defined by the SQL-2003 standard, though it's slightly surprising because NULL is not equal to NULL.

You can work around it by grouping on a different value, some function (mathematically speaking) of the data in your grouping column.

If you have a unique column X then this is easy.


Input

X      Y
-------------
1      a
2      a
3      b
4      b
5      c
6      (NULL)
7      (NULL)
8      d

Without fix

SELECT GROUP_CONCAT(`X`)
  FROM `tbl`
 GROUP BY `Y`;

Result:

GROUP_CONCAT(`foo`)
-------------------
6,7
1,2
3,4
5
8

With fix

SELECT GROUP_CONCAT(`X`)
  FROM `tbl`
 GROUP BY IFNULL(`Y`, `X`);

Result:

GROUP_CONCAT(`foo`)
-------------------
6
7
1,2
3,4
5
8

Let's take a closer look at how this is working

SELECT GROUP_CONCAT(`X`), IFNULL(`Y`, `X`) AS `grp`
  FROM `tbl`
 GROUP BY `grp`;

Result:

GROUP_CONCAT(`foo`)     `grp`
-----------------------------
6                       6
7                       7
1,2                     a
3,4                     b
5                       c
8                       d

If you don't have a unique column that you can use, you can try to generate a unique placeholder value instead. I'll leave this as an exercise to the reader.

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24

GROUP BY IFNULL(required_field, id)

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  • 1
    Simple, and straight to the point, this answer should be ranked up :) – jmserra Nov 6 '17 at 16:39
  • 2
    Be careful when using this solution, when "id" is the same as some of the "required_field"'s id you wont' get 2 results as you would expect. You'll get only 1 from "required_field". This is quite an edge case but be aware of it. To be sure that you'll get 2 results in cases when id-s are the same use UUID() or CONCAT to make unique ID for NULL values. – T0plomj3r Mar 1 '18 at 16:44
  • 2
    @T0plomj3r if required_field and id are of the same type, can be used GROUP BY IFNULL(required_field, -id) – Hett May 26 '19 at 16:02
10
SELECT table1.*, 
    GROUP_CONCAT(id SEPARATOR ',') AS children_ids
FROM table1
WHERE (enabled = 1) 
GROUP BY ancestor
       , CASE WHEN ancestor IS NULL
                  THEN table1.id
                  ELSE 0
         END
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  • I like the concise nature of this response – Luke Madhanga Apr 21 '15 at 11:57
  • GROUP BY IFNULL(Y, X); => this is game changer :) – ANKIT Mar 20 '19 at 9:01
6

Maybe faster version of previous solution in case you have unique identifier in table1 (let suppose it is table1.id) :

SELECT `table1`.*, 
    GROUP_CONCAT(id SEPARATOR ',') AS `children_ids`,
    IF(ISNULL(ancestor),table1.id,NULL) as `do_not_group_on_null_ancestor`
FROM `table1` 
WHERE (enabled = 1) 
GROUP BY `ancestor`, `do_not_group_on_null_ancestor`
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