Given a hex value of 0x80 (supplied as a uint16_t) in c++ how would I extract the digits into an int variable. I don't want to convert the hex to int, rather I want to extract the digits as an int, so for example, for 0x80 i want an int of 80, not 128, or for 0x55 I want 55 not 85, etc.

uint16_t hex = 0x80;
uint8_t val = ???; // Needs to be 80

Numbers with hex-only digits will never happen. I.e. input will only consist of decimal digits.
E.g. 0x08, 0x09, 0x10, 0x11, 0x12, etc.

  • at least you need to show the variable holding the hex value. Is it std::string, is it a char array or .... If you have done any code so far, post it. – 4386427 Aug 26 '17 at 10:22
  • Please show as much of a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example as you can. I.e. show how the input arrives and where to put results. – Yunnosch Aug 26 '17 at 10:22
  • 3
    What will 0xaa be represented as? Also do you know the upper limit for the number of hex digits? – Paul Floyd Aug 26 '17 at 10:30
  • 1
    It'll never happen, variables will be supplied like 0x08, 0x09, 0x10, 0x11, 0x12, etc – Matt Brailsford Aug 26 '17 at 10:31
  • 1
    @MattBrailsford You should improve your question title, it's totally misleading. Binary coded decimal, is the correct term for what you're after. – user0042 Aug 26 '17 at 12:03
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since you say that the hex number never contains 'a', 'b', etc. this code should do the trick:

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    uint16_t in = 0x4321;

    int t = (1000 * ((in & 0xf000) / (16*16*16))) + 
             (100 * ((in & 0xf00) / (16*16))) + 
              (10 * ((in & 0xf0) / 16)) + 
               (1 * ((in & 0xf) / 1));
    std::cout << t << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

output

4321

Explanation

A 16 bit hex number in = 0xWZYX is calculated as

in = W*16^3 + Z*16^2 + Y*16^1 + X*16^0 (or just W*16^3 + Z*16^2 + Y*16^1 + X)

When doing

in & 0xf000 you get 0xW000

when doing

0xW000 / 16^3 you get 0x000W or just W

When doing

1000 * W you get W000 decimal

The pattern is then repeated for each digit.

An alternative implementation using shift

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    uint16_t in = 0x9321;

    int t = (1000 * ((in & 0xf000) >> 12)) + 
             (100 * ((in & 0xf00) >> 8)) + 
              (10 * ((in & 0xf0) >> 4)) + 
               (1 * ((in & 0xf) >> 0));
    std::cout << t << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

For a 16 bit unsigned integer it can be okay to write out the four lines. However, if you wanted a similar function for a larger unsigned int, it may be better to do a loop to keep the code more compact and maintainable.

64 bit solution using a loop

#include <iostream>

int64_t directHexToDec(uint64_t in)
{
    int64_t res = 0;
    uint64_t mask = 0xf;
    uint64_t sh = 0;
    uint64_t mul = 1;
    for (int i=0; i<16; ++i)
    {
        res += mul * ((in & mask) >> sh);
        mul *= 10;
        mask <<= 4;
        sh += 4;
    }
    return res;
}

int main() {
    uint64_t in = 0x987654321;

    int64_t t = directHexToDec(in);
    std::cout << t << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

output

987654321
  • Thanks for the taking the time to explain rather than insult my lack of knowledge like some others. – Matt Brailsford Aug 26 '17 at 10:50
  • What if the number is too big will you hard-code it all? – Raindrop7 Aug 26 '17 at 11:34
  • @Raindrop7 - I would probably make a loop. We have 4 lines for uint16_t which is pretty easy to handled. For uint64_t that would be 16 lines and become a bit of a mess. Next step... 128 unsigned int.... that would for sure call for a loop. In the answer I avoid the loop to keep things simple. – 4386427 Aug 26 '17 at 11:39
  • Yes especially the OP cannot handle it on his own. Add a loop then edit. – Raindrop7 Aug 26 '17 at 11:41
  • @Raindrop7 - are you asking me if I will add a loop solution as well? – 4386427 Aug 26 '17 at 11:43

A simple implementation as follows:

int from_hex(uint16_t h)
{
    int d = 0;
    int power = 1;
    while (h)
    {
        // assert(h % 16 < 10)
        d += h % 16 * power;
        h /= 16;
        power *= 10;
    }
    return d;
}

And thanks to Minor Threat for the following:

int from_hex(uint16_t h)
{
    int d = 0;
    int power = 1;
    while (h)
    {
        // assert(h % 16 < 10)
        d += (h & 15) * power;
        h >>= 4;
        power *= 10;
    }
    return d;
}

I'm glad to know if something's wrong with my code

  • Can anybody tell me why when they are down voting? I'm a new comer so I don't know how to answer properly – leyanpan Aug 26 '17 at 10:52
  • I'm very sorry in you consider my previous comments as an insult, I am just surprised that you have such high reputation but asks a relatively easy question – leyanpan Aug 26 '17 at 10:56
  • "easy" is relative. It's easy if you know. I just don't get why you need to include judging statements in your reply. Does nothing but makes the OP feel stupid for asking for help, which is what SO is for after all. – Matt Brailsford Aug 26 '17 at 14:48
  • I'm very sorry for my mistake, please forgive me for my ignorance – leyanpan Aug 26 '17 at 15:02

This should work for hex <= 0x99:

#include <iostream>

unsigned int foo(unsigned int hex)
{
    return  hex - (hex >> 4) * 6;
}

/* Test */
int main()
{
    unsigned int vals[] = {0x08, 0x09, 0x10, 0x11, 0x12, 0x80};

    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(vals) / sizeof(vals[0]); i++)
        std::cout << foo(vals[i]) << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Result:

8
9
10
11
12
80
  • Add some explanation for the OP. +1 – Raindrop7 Aug 26 '17 at 11:47

A simpler answer using streams and string conversions. Please note, this wont work in case of 0x0A, 0X0B, ... values.

uint16_t val = 0x80;
std::stringstream stream;
stream << std::hex << val;
std::string resultStr(stream.str());
// In case of 0xYY hex value be carefull that YY fits into an uint8_t, 
// otherwise  this will overflow
uint8_t result = static_cast<uint8_t>(std::stoi(resultStr));

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