I have a series made of lists

import pandas as pd
s = pd.Series([[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]])

and I want a DataFrame with each column a list.

None of from_items, from_records, DataFrame Series.to_frame seem to work.

How to do this?

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can use from_items like this (assuming that your lists are of the same length):

pd.DataFrame.from_items(zip(s.index, s.values))

   0  1
0  1  4
1  2  5
2  3  6

or

pd.DataFrame.from_items(zip(s.index, s.values)).T

   0  1  2
0  1  2  3
1  4  5  6

depending on your desired output.

This can be much faster than using an apply (as used in @Wen's answer which, however, does also work for lists of different length):

%timeit pd.DataFrame.from_items(zip(s.index, s.values))
1000 loops, best of 3: 669 µs per loop

%timeit s.apply(lambda x:pd.Series(x)).T
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.37 ms per loop

and

%timeit pd.DataFrame.from_items(zip(s.index, s.values)).T
1000 loops, best of 3: 919 µs per loop

%timeit s.apply(lambda x:pd.Series(x))
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.26 ms per loop

Also @Hatshepsut's answer is quite fast (also works for lists of different length):

%timeit pd.DataFrame(item for item in s)
1000 loops, best of 3: 636 µs per loop

and

%timeit pd.DataFrame(item for item in s).T
1000 loops, best of 3: 884 µs per loop

Fastest solution seems to be @Abdou's answer (tested for Python 2; also works for lists of different length; use itertools.zip_longest in Python 3.6+):

%timeit pd.DataFrame.from_records(izip_longest(*s.values))
1000 loops, best of 3: 529 µs per loop

An additional option:

pd.DataFrame(dict(zip(s.index, s.values)))

   0  1
0  1  4
1  2  5
2  3  6
  • 1
    In case you'd like to add it, @Abdou's itertools solution seems to be even faster. but does require that additional library. Might also note the same-length restriction where that applies? – Hatshepsut Aug 27 '17 at 2:40
  • 1
    @Hatshepsut: Added. Same length does not seem to be required, also works fine for s = pd.Series([[1,2, 3,4], [4, 5,6]]) – Cleb Aug 27 '17 at 2:45
  • Why write s.apply(lambda x:pd.Series(x)) when we could just write s.apply(pd.Series)? :) – Kirill G Jun 20 at 19:49
  • @KirillG: I took this from Wen's answer for speed comparisons. – Cleb Jun 20 at 20:44

pd.DataFrame.from_records should also work using itertools.zip_longest:

from itertools import zip_longest

pd.DataFrame.from_records(zip_longest(*s.values))

#    0  1
# 0  1  4
# 1  2  5
# 2  3  6
  • Seem to be the fastest solution (upvoted). You might want to add that this is a Python3 solution; in Python 2 it would be itertools.izip_longest. – Cleb Aug 27 '17 at 2:40

You may looking for

s.apply(lambda x:pd.Series(x))
   0  1  2
0  1  2  3
1  4  5  6

Or

 s.apply(lambda x:pd.Series(x)).T

Out[133]: 
   0  1
0  1  4
1  2  5
2  3  6
  • Might not be the best choice here as it seems rather slow (see my timings below). – Cleb Aug 27 '17 at 2:13
  • @Cleb try this example s = pd.Series([[1,2, 3,4], [4, 5,6]]) I consider the different length of the list ~if it is the same length your answer is better ~ :) – Wen Aug 27 '17 at 2:15
  • 1
    Sure, then mine will fail, but Hatshepsut's still seems faster. I indeed assumed that all lists have the same length, will add this as a comment, thanks for pointing this out! – Cleb Aug 27 '17 at 2:17

Iterate over the series like this:

series = pd.Series([[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]])
pd.DataFrame(item for item in series)

   0  1  2
0  1  2  3
1  4  5  6
  • Quite fast; should add this to the timings below... (upvoted) – Cleb Aug 27 '17 at 2:07

If the length of the series is super high (more than 1m), you can use:

s = pd.Series([[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]])
pd.DataFrame(s.tolist())

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