25

I have a series made of lists

import pandas as pd
s = pd.Series([[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]])

and I want a DataFrame with each column a list.

None of from_items, from_records, DataFrame Series.to_frame seem to work.

How to do this?

22

As @Hatshepsut pointed out in the comments, from_items is deprecated as of version 0.23. The link suggests to use from_dict instead, so the old answer can be modified to:

pd.DataFrame.from_dict(dict(zip(s.index, s.values)))

--------------------------------------------------OLD ANSWER-------------------------------------------------------------

You can use from_items like this (assuming that your lists are of the same length):

pd.DataFrame.from_items(zip(s.index, s.values))

   0  1
0  1  4
1  2  5
2  3  6

or

pd.DataFrame.from_items(zip(s.index, s.values)).T

   0  1  2
0  1  2  3
1  4  5  6

depending on your desired output.

This can be much faster than using an apply (as used in @Wen's answer which, however, does also work for lists of different length):

%timeit pd.DataFrame.from_items(zip(s.index, s.values))
1000 loops, best of 3: 669 µs per loop

%timeit s.apply(lambda x:pd.Series(x)).T
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.37 ms per loop

and

%timeit pd.DataFrame.from_items(zip(s.index, s.values)).T
1000 loops, best of 3: 919 µs per loop

%timeit s.apply(lambda x:pd.Series(x))
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.26 ms per loop

Also @Hatshepsut's answer is quite fast (also works for lists of different length):

%timeit pd.DataFrame(item for item in s)
1000 loops, best of 3: 636 µs per loop

and

%timeit pd.DataFrame(item for item in s).T
1000 loops, best of 3: 884 µs per loop

Fastest solution seems to be @Abdou's answer (tested for Python 2; also works for lists of different length; use itertools.zip_longest in Python 3.6+):

%timeit pd.DataFrame.from_records(izip_longest(*s.values))
1000 loops, best of 3: 529 µs per loop

An additional option:

pd.DataFrame(dict(zip(s.index, s.values)))

   0  1
0  1  4
1  2  5
2  3  6
6
  • 2
    In case you'd like to add it, @Abdou's itertools solution seems to be even faster. but does require that additional library. Might also note the same-length restriction where that applies?
    – Hatshepsut
    Aug 27 '17 at 2:40
  • 1
    @Hatshepsut: Added. Same length does not seem to be required, also works fine for s = pd.Series([[1,2, 3,4], [4, 5,6]])
    – Cleb
    Aug 27 '17 at 2:45
  • Why write s.apply(lambda x:pd.Series(x)) when we could just write s.apply(pd.Series)? :) Jun 20 '18 at 19:49
  • @KirillG: I took this from Wen's answer for speed comparisons.
    – Cleb
    Jun 20 '18 at 20:44
  • 3
    from_items is now deprecated
    – Hatshepsut
    Jun 4 '19 at 17:28
9

If the length of the series is super high (more than 1m), you can use:

s = pd.Series([[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]])
pd.DataFrame(s.tolist())
8

Iterate over the series like this:

series = pd.Series([[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]])
pd.DataFrame(item for item in series)

   0  1  2
0  1  2  3
1  4  5  6
1
  • Quite fast; should add this to the timings below... (upvoted)
    – Cleb
    Aug 27 '17 at 2:07
7

pd.DataFrame.from_records should also work using itertools.zip_longest:

from itertools import zip_longest

pd.DataFrame.from_records(zip_longest(*s.values))

#    0  1
# 0  1  4
# 1  2  5
# 2  3  6
1
  • 1
    Seem to be the fastest solution (upvoted). You might want to add that this is a Python3 solution; in Python 2 it would be itertools.izip_longest.
    – Cleb
    Aug 27 '17 at 2:40
3

You may looking for

s.apply(lambda x:pd.Series(x))
   0  1  2
0  1  2  3
1  4  5  6

Or

 s.apply(lambda x:pd.Series(x)).T

Out[133]: 
   0  1
0  1  4
1  2  5
2  3  6
3
  • Might not be the best choice here as it seems rather slow (see my timings below).
    – Cleb
    Aug 27 '17 at 2:13
  • @Cleb try this example s = pd.Series([[1,2, 3,4], [4, 5,6]]) I consider the different length of the list ~if it is the same length your answer is better ~ :)
    – BENY
    Aug 27 '17 at 2:15
  • 1
    Sure, then mine will fail, but Hatshepsut's still seems faster. I indeed assumed that all lists have the same length, will add this as a comment, thanks for pointing this out!
    – Cleb
    Aug 27 '17 at 2:17
3

Try:

import numpy as np, pandas as pd
s = pd.Series([[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]])
pd.DataFrame(np.vstack(s))
1
  • This method is much faster than Cleb's one. Nice.
    – AMA
    Sep 9 at 9:42
2

Note that the from_items() method in the accepted answer is deprecated in the latest Pandas and from_dict() method should be used instead. Here is how:

pd.DataFrame.from_dict(dict(zip(s.index, s.values)))

## OR  

pd.DataFrame.from_dict(dict(zip(s.index, s.values))).T

Also note that using from_dict() provides us with the fastest approach so far:

%timeit pd.DataFrame.from_dict(dict(zip(s.index, s.values)))
376 µs ± 14.4 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

## OR

%timeit pd.DataFrame.from_dict(dict(zip(s.index, s.values))).T
487 µs ± 3.5 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)
1
  • does from_records change anything about this answer?
    – baxx
    Sep 6 '20 at 23:57

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