3

I'm trying to implement a Depth First Algoritmn in Perl to solve a maze of this kind:

enter image description here

I successfully parsed the maze into a hash called %friends that gives the neighbours of each node. Implementing the algorithm itself was fairly straightforward. However, I'm unable to get return only the nodes of the correct path. My current code looks like this (I included the hash returned from my parse code):

#bin/usr/perl

my %friends = (
    1 => [6, 2],
    2 => [1, 3],
    3 => [8, 2],
    4 => [5],
    5 => [10, 4],
    6 => [1, 11],
    7 => [8],
    8 => [3, 7],
    9 => [14, 10],
    10 => [5, 15, 9],
    11 => [6, 12],
    12 => [17, 11],
    13 => [14],
    14 => [9, 19, 13],
    15 => [10, 20],
    16 => [17],
    17 => [12, 16, 18],
    18 => [17, 19],
    19 => [14, 18],
    20 => [15],
);

sub depth_search {
    ($place, $seen, $path) = @_;
    $seen{$place} = "seen";

    if($place eq 5){
        print "@curr_path";
        return;
    }

    for my $friend (@{$friends{$place}}){
        if(!defined($seen{$friend})){
            push(@curr_path, $friend);
            depth_search($friend, %seen, @curr_path);
        }

    }

}

my %seen;
my @path;

depth_search(2, %seen, @path);

The output I get from this code is:

1 6 11 12 17 16 18 19 14 9 10 5

@curr_path seems to contain all of the visited nodes, which translates here into the false inclusion of the 16 node. It's probably more related to how Perl handles passing arrays but I can't seem to find a proper solution.

12
  • 2
    Why are all your variables global? Are you not using strict and warnings?
    – melpomene
    Aug 28, 2017 at 14:50
  • 1
    See Graph. Aug 28, 2017 at 15:07
  • 2
    20 => [1,5],?! Aug 28, 2017 at 15:47
  • 2
    13 => [1,4]?!
    – mob
    Aug 28, 2017 at 16:17
  • 3
    Please add use strict; use warnings; at the top of your program.
    – melpomene
    Aug 28, 2017 at 17:12

3 Answers 3

11

You have a single @curr_path variable. For that to work, you would have to remove entries from it when you backtrack. (Renamed to @path below.)

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw( current_sub say );

sub find_all_solutions_dfs {
    my ($passages, $entrance, $exit) = @_;

    my @path = $entrance;
    my %seen = ( $entrance => 1 );

    my $helper = sub {
        my $here = $path[-1];
        if ($here == $exit) {
            say "@path";
            return;
        }

        for my $passage (grep { !$seen{$_} } @{ $passages->{$here} }) {
            push @path, $passage;
            ++$seen{$passage};
            __SUB__->();
            --$seen{$passage};
            pop @path;
        }
    };

    $helper->();
}

{
    my %passages = ( 1 => [6, 2], ..., 20 => [15] );
    my $entrance = 2;
    my $exit = 5;
    find_all_solutions_dfs(\%passages, $entrance, $exit);
}

Instead of changing %seen and @path back and forth, we can make copies of the variables and change those. Then, returning will automatically backtrack. (As an optimization, @_ will be @path.)

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw( current_sub say );

sub find_solution_dfs {
    my ($passages, $entrance, $exit) = @_;

    my $helper = sub {
        my $here = $_[-1];
        if ($here == $exit) {
           say "@_";
           return;
        }

        my %seen = map { $_ => 1 } @_;
        __SUB__->(@_, $_)
           for
              grep { !$seen{$_} }
                 @{ $passages->{$here} };
    };

    $helper->($entrance);
}

{
    my %passages = ( 1 => [6, 2], ..., 20 => [15] );
    my $entrance = 2;
    my $exit = 5;
    find_solution_dfs(\%passages, $entrance, $exit);
}

Let's switch to using a stack variable instead of recursion. It's a little faster, but the main reason is that it will help the next step. Let's also make it so it stops at the first solution.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw( say );

sub find_solution_dfs {
    my ($passages, $entrance, $exit) = @_;

    my @todo = ( [ $entrance ] );
    while (@todo) {
        my $path = shift(@todo);
        my $here = $path->[-1];
        return @$path if $here == $exit;

        my %seen = map { $_ => 1 } @$path;
        unshift @todo,
            map { [ @$path, $_ ] } 
                grep { !$seen{$_} }
                    @{ $passages->{$here} };
    }

    return;
}

{
    my %passages = ( 1 => [6, 2], ..., 20 => [15] );
    my $entrance = 2;
    my $exit = 5;
    if ( my @solution = find_solution_dfs(\%passages, $entrance, $exit)) {
        say "@solution";
    } else {
        say "No solution.";
    }
}

While a depth-first search will find a solution, it won't necessarily be the shortest. Using a breadth-first search will find the shortest. Not only is that nicer, it will greatly speed things up in some circumstances.

Gaining these benefits is literally a one-word change from the previous version (unshiftpush) to changes @todo from a stack to a queue.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw( say );

sub find_solution_bfs {
    my ($passages, $entrance, $exit) = @_;

    my @todo = ( [ $entrance ] );
    while (@todo) {
        my $path = shift(@todo);
        my $here = $path->[-1];
        return @$path if $here == $exit;

        my %seen = map { $_ => 1 } @$path;
        push @todo,
            map { [ @$path, $_ ] } 
                grep { !$seen{$_} }
                    @{ $passages->{$here} };
    }

    return;
}

{
    my %passages = ( 1 => [6, 2], ..., 20 => [15] );
    my $entrance = 2;
    my $exit = 5;
    if ( my @solution = find_solution_bfs(\%passages, $entrance, $exit)) {
        say "@solution";
    } else {
        say "No solution.";
    }
}

Finally, since we're using a BFS and since we're only finding the first solution, we can optimize the above by using a single %seen. In fact, we don't even need %seen then since we can just remove from %$passages instead!

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw( say );

sub find_solution_bfs {
    my ($passages, $entrance, $exit) = @_;
    $passages = { %$passages };  # Make a copy so we don't clobber caller's.

    my @todo = ( [ $entrance ] );
    while (@todo) {
        my $path = shift(@todo);
        my $here = $path->[-1];
        return @$path if $here == $exit;

        my $passages_from_here = delete($passages->{$here});
        push @todo,
            map { [ @$path, $_ ] } 
               grep { $passages->{$_} }  # Keep only the unvisited.
                    @$passages_from_here;
    }

    return;
}


{
    my %passages = ( 1 => [6, 2], ..., 20 => [15] );
    my $entrance = 2;
    my $exit = 5;
    if ( my @solution = find_solution_bfs(\%passages, $entrance, $exit)) {
        say "@solution";
    } else {
        say "No solution.";
    }
}
0
6

Note that Graph provides Graph::Traversal which is backed by Graph::Traversal::BFS and Graph::Traversal::DFS.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Graph::Directed;
use Graph::Traversal::BFS;

my $graph = Graph::Directed->new;

# Note: Maze definition corrected to match maze graphic
my %maze = (
    1 => [6, 2],
    2 => [1,3],
    3 => [8, 2],
    4 => [5],
    5 => [10, 4],
    6 => [1, 11],
    7 => [8],
    8 => [3, 7],
    9 => [14, 10],
    10 => [5, 15, 9],
    11 => [6, 12],
    12 => [17, 11],
    13 => [14],
    14 => [9, 19, 13],
    15 => [10, 20],
    16 => [17],
    17 => [12, 16, 18],
    18 => [17, 19],
    19 => [14,18],
    20 => [15],
);

for my $node (keys %maze) {
    $graph->add_edge($node, $_) for @{ $maze{$node} };
}

my $traversal = Graph::Traversal::DFS->new($graph,
    start => 2,
    next_numeric => 1,
    pre => sub {
        my ($v, $self) = @_;
        print "$v\n";
        $self->terminate if $v == 5;
    }
);

$traversal->dfs;

Output:

2
1
6
11
12
17
16
18
19
14
9
10
5
0
5

Your main problem is that when you hit a dead-end and then backtrack, your %seen and @path variables remain unchanged, still populated with the dead-end spaces.

(Also, if you put "use strict;" and "use warnings;" in your program you'll uncover some errors you didn't realize were happening.)

The main fix is to create a new path list (that's identical to the old @path, but with the new node) and use that to pass into the recursive call. That way, when your algorithm backtracks, it doesn't take the old, dead-end paths with it.

In fact, since you can easily construct a %seen set from the @path array, there's no point in passing it in at every call to depth_search(). And since depth_search() takes a @path variable, you technically don't even need a $place variable, as you can find it from the last element of the @path array.

Here's the code I recommend:

#!/usr/bin/perl
# From:  https://stackoverflow.com/questions/45921739/returning-path-of-maze-in-perl-with-depth-first-algorithm

use strict;
use warnings;

my %friends = (
    1 => [6, 2],
    2 => [1, 3],
    3 => [8, 2],
    4 => [5],
    5 => [10, 4],
    6 => [1, 11],
    7 => [8],
    8 => [3, 7],
    9 => [14, 10],
    10 => [5, 15, 9],
    11 => [6, 12],
    12 => [17, 11],
    13 => [14],
    14 => [9, 19, 13],
    15 => [10, 20],
    16 => [17],
    17 => [12, 16, 18],
    18 => [17, 19],
    19 => [14, 18],
    20 => [15],
);


sub depth_search
{
    my @path = @_;

    if ($path[-1] == 5)  # end at node 5
    {
        print "@path\n";
        return;
    }

    # Put all the places we've been to in a "seen" set,
    # to make sure not to revisit the ones we've already seen:
    my %seen;  @seen{@path} = ();

    foreach my $friend (@{$friends{$path[-1]}})
    {
        # Don't process nodes we've already seen:
        next  if exists $seen{$friend};

        # Recurse using the passed-in @path with 
        # the $friend as an additional node:
        depth_search(@path, $friend);
    }
}


depth_search(2);  # start at node 2

__END__

Its output is:

2 1 6 11 12 17 18 19 14 9 10 5
1
  • 1
    That's the same as my second version, except yours still uses a mix of global vars and hardcoded values instead of parameters. It also keeps searching for a solution after finding a solution. Not even counting that, it also performs extremely poorly for some mazes. (It can easily take thousands or millions of times longer than necessary.) It's really unfortunately you convinced the OP this is good answer :(
    – ikegami
    Aug 29, 2017 at 15:51

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