Here's a dataframe:

    A  B  C
0   6  2 -5
1   2  5  2
2  10  3  1
3  -5  2  8
4   3  6  2

I could retrieve a column which is basically a tuple of columns from the original df using df.apply:

out = df.apply(tuple, 1)
print(out)

0    (6, 2, -5)
1     (2, 5, 2)
2    (10, 3, 1)
3    (-5, 2, 8)
4     (3, 6, 2)
dtype: object

But if I want a list of values instead of a tuple of them, I can't do it, because it doesn't give me what I expect:

out = df.apply(list, 1)
print(out)

    A  B  C
0   6  2 -5
1   2  5  2
2  10  3  1
3  -5  2  8
4   3  6  2

Instead, I need to do:

out = pd.Series(df.values.tolist())
print(out)

0    [6, 2, -5]
1     [2, 5, 2]
2    [10, 3, 1]
3    [-5, 2, 8]
4     [3, 6, 2]
dtype: object

Why can't I use df.apply(list, 1) to get what I want?


Appendix

Timings of some possible workarounds:

df_test = pd.concat([df] * 10000, 0)

%timeit pd.Series(df.values.tolist()) # original workaround
10000 loops, best of 3: 161 µs per loop

%timeit df.apply(tuple, 1).apply(list, 1) # proposed by Alexander
1000 loops, best of 3: 615 µs per loop
  • Strange behaviour. df.apply(tuple, 1).apply(list) as workaround? – Alexander Aug 28 '17 at 23:06
  • @Alexander Possible, but slow. :( Added some timings. – coldspeed Aug 28 '17 at 23:08
  • 3
    At the point where you have a DataFrame of list-objects, you've pretty much abandoned all hope of speed and efficiency anyways... Note, .apply is just a wrapper around a Python for-loop, so just use iterrows with a for-loop yourself and that will likely be faster than either .apply approach. – juanpa.arrivillaga Aug 28 '17 at 23:09
  • @juanpa.arrivillaga Statutory Warning I'm aware of... was just curious to know why pandas doesn't behave consistently with lists and tuples. – coldspeed Aug 28 '17 at 23:11
  • Probably because it is not really meant to work with either of them as items, and I am willing to bet that it special-cases lists of lists to work like arrays somewhere deep in the bowels of the handling in pd.DataFrame.apply, but doesn't do that with tuples. But if you really care about a workaround for an .apply that isn't working, (that isn't using ufuncs to begin with), then a for-loop with iterrows or iteritems is the way to go... – juanpa.arrivillaga Aug 28 '17 at 23:17
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The culprit is here. With func=tuple it works, but using func=list raises an exception from within the compiled module lib.reduce:

ValueError: ('function does not reduce', 0)

As you can see, they catch the exception but don't bother to handle it.

Even without the too-broad except clause, that's a bug in pandas. You might try to raise it on their tracker, but similar issues have been closed with some flavour of wont-fix or dupe.

16321: weird behavior using apply() creating list based on current columns

15628: Dataframe.apply does not always return a Series when reduce=True

That latter issue got closed, then reopened, and converted into a docs enhancement request some months ago, and now seems to be being used as a dumping ground for any related issues.

Presumably it's not a high priority because, as piRSquared commented (and one of the pandas maintainers commented the same), you're better off with a list comprehension:

pd.Series([list(x) for x in df.itertuples(index=False)])

Typically apply would be using a numpy ufunc or similar.

  • Thanks a bunch. I'll look into these links. – coldspeed Aug 29 '17 at 15:07

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